Accessibility Compliance Service, AAAtraq, Has Teamed up With AbleDocs, Enabling Subscribers to Publish Accessible Documents More Easily on Their Websites.


April 01, 2021

TORONTO, Ontario & LONDON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–AbleDocs Inc. (https://www.abledocs.com) is the worldwide leader in document accessibility products and services, making document accessibility fast, easy, secure, and cost-effective.

By integrating AbleDocs’ class-leading technologies, subscribers will be able to manage all types of documents, including PDFs, directly from within the AAAtraq (https://www.aaatraq.com) platform.

“AAAtraq is creating an accessibility ecosystem by linking complementary technologies via intelligent automation to improve understanding and reduce the time and cost of compliance for organizations,” said Lawrence Shaw, CEO of AAAtraq. “AbleDocs is a highly respected document accessibility service provider, and we are delighted that their technology will be integrated into our platform.”

The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown content compliance firmly into the spotlight as the importance of accessing goods, services and information online has grown.

“AbleDocs’ leadership has been helping organizations improve their accessibility for over a combined 150 years. This partnership will expand our current reach and mean that thousands of people with disabilities from around the world will be able to take advantage of an accessible digital environment that has become so important to all our lives,” said Adam Spencer, President (GLOBAL) of AbleDocs Inc.

In only a few months of operation AAAtraq has already started to bring about change. Accessibility and the impact of content failure is now moving from an issue dealt with by a digital or IT team, to those managing risk.

“ADA compliance isn’t about uploading a plugin and then thinking you are compliant. It’s something that needs to be adopted throughout all levels of the organization and treated in the same way as any other regulatory requirement. AAAtraq is about making the compliance easier to achieve, and services like AbleDocs are central to that objective,” concluded Shaw.

“AbleDocs is excited to help existing and future AAAtraq customers achieve their accessibility, usability and compliance goals, by ensuring all content is accessible for all users, and supporting that in nearly 50 languages,” added Spencer.

To celebrate the partnership, AAAtraq are offering a 15% lifetime subscription discount for those signing up at https://AAAtraq.com/AbleDocs before the end of April 2021.

About AAAtraq

AAAtraq (www.aaatraq.com) is an InsurTech solution to shield organizations from unnecessary legal aggression and then remove unnecessary cost, reducing the time it takes to understand, achieve and maintain ADA website compliance.

Our intelligence-driven automation provides a strategic, principle-driven pathway with clear timescales and milestones to compliance along with $10,000 (rising to $50,000 as clients progress) of litigation cost coverage within just one month, all for a $99/month subscription.

Ongoing staff support, digital supply chain oversight and monthly reporting replace complexity with confidence. AAAtraq, for those managing risk, not digital.

For more information, visit https://www.AAAtraq.com

About AbleDocs Inc.

AbleDocs was founded in 2019 as a conglomerate of PDF accessibility remediation service providers and has grown to have operations in Canada, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, and the United States. Its founders have been making documents accessible for over 150 years combined experience and has since expanded its offerings to include a completely new approach to document accessibility strategies to include products for high volume document accessibility, document accessibility testing.

AbleDocs is the only company in the world to guarantee the compliance of every file they produce and back it with a $10,000,000 liability guarantee. Current offerings include ADService, ADGateway, ADScan, ADStream, ADLegacy, ADForms, axesWord and axesPDF.

For more information, visit https://www.abledocs.com

Original at https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210401005090/en/Accessibility-Compliance-Service-AAAtraq-Has-Teamed-up-With-AbleDocs-Enabling-Subscribers-to-Publish-Accessible-Documents-More-Easily-on-Their-Websites.




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Accessible Customer Service in Ontario and Manitoba


Many separate accessibility standards development processes exist in Canada. Ontario, Manitoba, and Nova Scotia all have laws that mandate creation of provincial accessibility standards. In addition, the Accessible Canada Act mandates accessibility standards that apply to organizations under federal jurisdiction. However, the government of Canada intends to coordinate federal and provincial accessibility laws. Moreover, the third review of the AODA recommends that the Ontario government should support this aim by aligning its accessibility law, the AODA, with the laws of other provinces and the country. If the governments work together to make these laws more similar, the AODA standards development process may change to align with laws in other places across the country. In this article, we will explore accessible customer service in Ontario and Manitoba.

Accessible Customer Service in Ontario and Manitoba

The customer service standards under the AODA and the accessible customer service standard under the Accessibility for Manitobans Act both require service providers to make their goods and services accessible for customers with disabilities. Moreover, both standards require many of the same processes and practices to ensure accessibility. For instance, both standards require service providers in the public and private sectors to:

Differences Between Standards

However, Ontario’s standard requires providers to notify customers about disruptions to any accessible service. In contrast, Manitoba’s standard only requires providers to notify customers about disruptions involving the built environment. In other words, customers in Manitoba may not find out about disruptions to services they need, such as:

Moreover, while both standards apply to providers that offer goods and services, Ontario’s standard also applies to providers that operate facilities.

On the other hand, Manitoba’s standard requires providers to comply with the rules in their customer service policies. In contrast, Ontario’s standard requires providers to create policies, but does not directly state that providers must perform the tasks their policies describe.

In addition, Manitoba’s standard also requires providers to ensure the accessibility of public events, such as:

  • Public meetings
  • Public hearings
  • Consultation processes that the law requires

Under the standard, providers planning or hosting these events must:

  • Hold them in physically accessible locations
  • Ensure that notice of the events appears in accessible formats
  • Meet people’s needs for physical and communication accessibility, upon request
  • Notify the public that people can request accessibility support

In contrast, Ontario’s standard does not designate additional accessibility guidelines for public events. However, a higher degree of accessibility for these events could benefit Ontarians, because these events may have a large impact on the lives of the people who attend.

The customer service standards of the AODA and the Accessibility for Manitobans Act may change over time to improve accessibility. To do so, the standards can exchange best practices, or learn them from standards that develop in other Canadian regions or jurisdictions.




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Improving AODA Compliance in Customer Service


Under the AODA, private or non-profit businesses with twenty to forty-nine (20-49) workers, or fifty (50) or more workers, must complete accessibility reports every three years. The next accessibility reports for private or non-profit businesses were due on December 31st, 2020. However, the Ontario government has extended this deadline. This extended deadline for accessibility reports for private or non-profit businesses is June 30th, 2021. Nonetheless, businesses should use this extra time to assess how compliant they are with AODA standards. Moreover, businesses should also improve their compliance by changing the services they offer so that their businesses are more accessible. In this article, we will outline ways to improve AODA compliance in customer service.

Improving AODA Compliance in Customer Service

Even if businesses are fully compliant with the customer service standards, they can still make changes to their policies and services to enhance accessibility. For instance, some services that businesses could offer include:

In addition, service providers can alert all customers about all accessible features and services they have. For example, businesses can inform customers about the availability and location of physical features, such as:

Likewise, businesses can also tell customers about other accessible services, such as:

Finally, businesses that do not yet offer these features and services can explain how they will meet customers’ needs in other ways, such as:

  • Meeting customers in accessible locations
  • Serving customers by phone or email
  • Alerting customers to information on inaccessible signage

When service providers make customers aware of the accessible services they have, they can start doing business with many more clients.

Enhanced Customer Service Training

Furthermore, businesses can also improve the quality of the customer service training their staff receive. Under the customer service standards, training can take many formats, from basic handouts to more in-depth instruction. When staff receive higher-quality training, they can learn:

High-quality training can also be geared specifically to a business’s services. For instance, restaurant staff could have training that helps them practice:

This practice will allow staff to gain experience serving customers with a variety of disabilities. As a result, businesses can confidently welcome and serve all their customers.




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Assessing AODA Compliance in Customer Service


Under the AODA, private or non-profit businesses with twenty to forty-nine (20-49) workers, or fifty (50) or more workers, must complete accessibility reports every three years. The next accessibility reports for private or non-profit businesses were due on December 31st, 2020. However, the Ontario government has extended this deadline. This extended deadline for accessibility reports for private or non-profit businesses is June 30th, 2021. Nonetheless, businesses should use this extra time to assess how compliant they are with AODA standards. Moreover, businesses should also improve their compliance by changing the services they offer so that their businesses are more accessible. In this article, we will outline ways to assess AODA compliance in customer service.

Assessing AODA Compliance in Customer Service

Businesses that have twenty (20) or more workers and provide customer service need to comply with AODA customer service requirements, including:

In addition, businesses with fifty (50) or more workers need to:

  • Document their customer service policies
  • Have accessibility plans
  • Update policies and plans every five years
  • Keep records of workers’ AODA training

The extended deadline for AODA compliance reports gives staff of businesses more time to assess how well their companies are fulfilling all these requirements.

How to Assess AODA Customer Service Compliance

Companies can start to assess their AODA compliance by requesting anonymous feedback from customers who have needed accessible service. For instance, they can ask customers whether staff interacted with them courteously, in ways that:

  • Respected their dignity and independence
  • Integrated service for customers with and without disabilities, whenever possible
  • Offered equal opportunities to customers with and without disabilities
  • Took their accessibility needs into account

Companies could also ask whether staff:

  • Interacted comfortably and appropriately with their service animal or support person
  • Knew how to find and operate any assistive devices available at the premises
  • Publicized service disruptions and other communications in ways they could access, such as:
  • Responded well to any feedback they offered

If customers have the option to describe their positive or negative encounters with staff, these stories can help staff recognize what they should or should not do when providing accessible service. For example, a customer could describe an incident when staff spoke to their support person instead of directly to them. However, this customer could also explain how staff learned to speak directly to them, instead of about them. Alternatively, another customer could state that staff were not willing to allow their service animal on the premises, and so discriminated against them.

If much of the feedback is negative, it is likely that the business is not compliant with the AODA. As a result, the business will need to make changes, which could include:

  • Improving AODA customer service training
  • Updating policies, plans, or processes

Accessibility Consulting

In addition, businesses could enter short-term or on-going contracts to consult with people who have disabilities. Alternatively, companies could request the services of professional organizations that specialize in assessing accessibility. In either case, an accessibility assessor with lived experience of disability could:

  • Observe and give feedback on the quality of AODA training
  • Comment on the content and accessibility of documents, such as:
    • Customer service policies and plans
    • Feedback processes
    • Notifications of service disruptions

If any of these processes do not comply with AODA requirements, consultants could offer suggestions or assistance. Moreover, consultants could also help companies find resources to support them in strengthening their policies and services.




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Ontario investing $1B over 6 years to improve internet, cellphone service


The Ontario government is committing nearly $1 billion over six years to improve and expand broadband internet and cellular access across the province.

In the village of Minden on Wednesday afternoon, Premier Doug Ford announced an additional investment of $680 million on top of $315 million announced in 2019 to support the province’s “Up to Speed: Ontario’s Broadband and Cellular Action Plan.”

“Reliable, high-speed internet is no longer a luxury, it is necessary for everyday life,” said Ford. “It allows people to bank, shop, learn to get their news or watch their favourite movies and we take that for granted.”

Read more:
EORN to propose billion dollar rural broadband internet expansion

Ford says providing high-speed internet to communities like Minden, about 100 kilometres north of Peterborough, will create “good jobs” and unlock “new opportunities” for businesses and people.

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“With the world online these days, if we are going to attract more investment to Ontario and compete in this highly competitive global marketplace, we need every part of our province connected with high-speed Internet,” said Ford, noting how more people have turned to internet since the coronavirus pandemic.

The province says more than 1.4 million people in Ontario do not have broadband or cellular access and up to 12 per cent of households (mostly rural, remote or Northern areas) are “underserved or unserved,” according to Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission data.

Minister of Infrastructure Laurie Scott called Wednesday’s announcement a “watershed moment” for broadband. The MPP for Haliburton-Kawartha Lakes-Brock says in an increasingly digital world, Ontarians need to be connected.

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“This investment will connect even more residents in communities across Ontario to faster, more reliable internet and cell service,” said Scott. “Today’s commitment to connect more people to reliable broadband and cellular service ― along with many others we’ve made ― will make it easier for more people to work and learn from home, run their businesses and connect with others.”

The action plan aims to improve connections for up to 220,000 households and businesses, Scott said, and includes a $150-million infrastructure program beginning in 2020-21 with “shovel-ready projects.”

Read more:
EORN to propose billion dollar rural broadband internet expansion

Scott did not outline any specific projects on Wednesday, stating funding is the “start of conversations” with municipalities and telecommunications partners along with expected support from Ottawa.

“We’re hopeful the federal government will release its Universal Broadband Fund — Ontario has stepped up and is putting $1 billion on the table,” she said.

“Ontario isn’t waiting any longer. That is why we are taking action today.”

Peter Bethlenfalvy, president of the Treasury Board, says the investment is a “signature project” of the Ontario Onwards Action Plan to make vital programs and services more convenient, reliable and accessible.

“We cannot afford to be an offline government in an online world,” said Bethlenfalvy.

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The investment announced Wednesday also doubles funding for the Improving Connectivity in Ontario (ICON) program announced in June, bringing the new total to $300 million, said Scott. She said the program now has the potential to leverage more than $900 million in total partner funding to improve connectivity across Ontario.

Ontario has also partnered with the Eastern Ontario Regional Network (EORN) to invest $71 million in a $213-million project to improve access to cellular service and mobile broadband in Eastern Ontario.

Andy Letham, Mayor of the City of Kawartha Lakes and Brent Devolin, mayor of Minden Hills Township, both expressed their gratitude for Wednesday’s announcement.

“It will help connect more homes and businesses in Ontario communities and increase their economic competitiveness,” said Letham. “And improve the quality of life for residents and businesses.”

The action plan says coverage for internet connections should be at speeds of at least 50 megabits per second (Mbps) download and 10 Mbps upload.

Rocco Rossi, president & CEO of the Ontario Chamber of Commerce, said the chamber welcomes the additional investments to help underserved communities.

“Canada’s telecommunications network is one of the most advanced networks in the world,” he said. “The vast majority of heavy lifting has been done by the private sector which has invested heavily in digital infrastructure. However, there remains unserved and underserved communities that require the government to step in.

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“For business, health care and education, particularly those workers practicing physical distancing, connectivity is necessary to ensure they can remain productive by using digital tools such as video conferencing. Without adequate access, those in rural and remote regions will be vulnerable to additional layoffs and business closures. We hope to see the federal government consider how to both expedite and increase the federal investment for broadband connectivity to help further support Ontarians in unserved and underserved communities.”


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Broadband expansion critical to recovery: Northumberland recovery task force


Broadband expansion critical to recovery: Northumberland recovery task force – Jun 8, 2020




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City of Kawartha Lakes Police Service accessed coronavirus database more than 1,000 times – Peterborough


The City of Kawartha Lakes Police Service is being asked to explain why it accessed Ontario’s coronavirus patient database more than 1,000 times, according to a group of human rights organizations.

Earlier this month, the province of Ontario ended police access to data about Ontarians who had tested positive for COVID-19 — a provision that was permitted in April when the government passed an emergency order under the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act (EMCPA).

However a group of human rights organizations — the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, Aboriginal Legal Services, the Black Legal Action Centre, and HIV & AIDS Legal Clinic Ontario — launched a lawsuit challenging the decision to release personal health information and that it “violated individuals’ statutory privacy and constitutional Charter rights.”

Read more:
Ontario ends police access to coronavirus database after legal challenge

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The lawsuit was dropped after the province restricted access to the database.

However, on Monday, the groups announced they are targeting police services that accessed the database and have sent letters to the five police services in Ontario that had the highest per capita use rate of the database.

“While we welcome the province’s decision to stop sharing this information with police services, we remain deeply concerned about the continued local storage and use of personal health information that has already been accessed by police services across the province,” the groups stated.

Among them is the City of Kawartha Lakes Police Service in Lindsay. The groups say the police service accessed the database 1,015 times while it was active which the groups say is “unusually high.”

In their letter to police services board chairman Don Thomas and police chief Mark Mitchell, the groups say they want all personal health information that was collected to be deleted.

They also want information on where the COVID-19 data was stored, who had access and for what purposes, as well as details regarding the process of how the data will be deleted.

“We are also concerned about the extremely high number of access requests made by the Kawartha Lakes Police Service,” the letter reads. “Taking into account the population served by the Kawartha Lakes Police Service, KLPS has one of the top five per capita data access rates in the province. The abnormally high number of times the data was accessed raises concerns about whether the database was being used appropriately and whether this large amount of personal information is still being used locally.”

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Global News Peterborough has reached out to Thomas and Mitchell for comment.

Read more:
Over 500 coronavirus cases connected to public places in Canada since July 4, data shows

In an email to Global News Peterborough, Mitchell said the service received the letter on Tuesday and will be discussing the information requests with the police services board.

“I can say that we recognize that the use of the COVID database was a difficult balance between the privacy of individual medical information and the safety of front-line personnel who continued to provide emergency services during the pandemic,” Mitchell told Global News.

“The City of Kawartha Lakes Police Service implemented measures to ensure that the database was used only for the prescribed purpose and that confidential information was handled in adherence to the EMCPA and its Regulations.”

The groups want an audit of the use of the database and make the results of the audit available to the board and the public.

“Transparency and accountability require that the public be informed of the reasons for the Kawartha Lakes Police Service’s unusually high number of searches against the database,” the letter concludes.






Coronavirus outbreak: Federal ministers address COVID-19 patient information database


Coronavirus outbreak: Federal ministers address COVID-19 patient information database




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Temporary Service Disruptions After the COVID-19 Pandemic


As the COVID-19 pandemic progresses, we cheer ourselves by thinking of future socializing in-person. We also think about returning to work or activities we love. These hopes help us through the challenges of physical distancing. Moreover, these challenges show us that we can be more flexible or more creative than we thought we could. For instance, retail stores and other organizations have adapted to physical distancing requirements during the pandemic. Many of these adaptations are also practices that make customer service more accessible for customers with disabilities. In the post-COVID-19 future, more people may recognize the value of adapting service to meet customers’ diverse needs. For example, more service providers may notify customers about temporary service disruptions after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Temporary Service Disruptions After the COVID-19 Pandemic

As service providers encourage physical distancing and other safety procedures, they have made many changes to their business practices. In addition, they have informed customers about these changes, which may include:

  • Contactless procedures for purchasing items in person
  • New or expanded opportunities to shop or receive service online
  • New or changed delivery options
  • Hours of operation

Moreover, as the government allows more businesses to re-open, organizations make on-going changes to these new procedures. For instance, they may:

  • Ask customers to wait for pick-up in new locations
  • Develop more options for service online or by phone
  • Increase their hours

As businesses and other organizations make these changes, they must continue to keep potential customers informed.

In the same way, service providers can adapt just as proactively to improve the ways they notify customers with disabilities about temporary service disruptions.

AODA Requirements for Notifying Customers of Temporary Service Disruptions

Under the Customer Service Standards of the AODA, service providers must notify customers about temporary service disruptions. Temporary service disruptions happen when services that customers with disabilities might rely on are temporarily unavailable. There are many reasons for service disruptions, including:

  • Scheduled maintenance on structural features, such as:
    • Accessible parking spaces
    • Ramps
  • Unexpected events, such as:
    • An out-of-order accessible washroom
    • A broken elevator or lift
  • Technical difficulties, such as with:
    • Captioning equipment
    • Teletypewriter (TTY) technology
    • Hardware for making alternate formats, like photo-copiers or Braille printers
    • Software, like screen readers or speech recognition programs
    • Systems for broadcasting audio or visual announcements
  • Staff shortages, such as the absence of:

When and How to Notify

In the same way that service providers keep the public informed of changes due to COVID-19, they must also alert the public to disruptions in accessible service. When a provider knows in advance about a coming disruption, such as elevator maintenance, the provider should give the public advance notice as well. When the disruption is unexpected, like a technological glitch with captioning equipment, the provider should let the public know as soon as possible. Moreover, notifications should include:

  • What the disrupted service is
  • The reason for the disruption
  • How long the disruption will last
  • Alternate methods of service

These details will help customers plan how they want or need to proceed. Some customers may prefer to use the service they normally use and will want to know when it will be available again. Others may need service at a certain time, even if the service they normally use is still disrupted. They will need to know how the provider will meet their needs in spite of the disruption. Some alternate methods of service include meeting customers outside the premises or on the first floor, using other communication strategies, or recommending other locations where the customer can access needed services immediately.

Notification Formats

Furthermore, providers must post notifications in different places and formats so that all customers have access to them. Providers can post signs outside their doors and next to the disrupted service. Additionally, they should alert all customer service personnel to the disruption so that staff can give customers the information in person. Finally, they should also post notifications on their websites and on phone-answering systems.

Customer service providers have learned that they can quickly react to changing work conditions and share the changes with their customers. Therefore, staff can continue to use these strategies to notify customers with disabilities about temporary service disruptions after the COVID-19 pandemic.




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AODA Customer Service Training After the COVID-19 Pandemic


As the COVID-19 pandemic progresses, we cheer ourselves by thinking of future socializing in-person. We also think about returning to work or activities we love. These hopes help us through the challenges of physical distancing. Moreover, these challenges show us that we can be more flexible or more creative than we thought we could. For instance, retail stores and other organizations have adapted to physical distancing requirements during the pandemic. Many of these adaptations are also practices that make customer service more accessible for customers with disabilities. In the post-COVID-19 future, more people may recognize the value of adapting service to meet customers’ diverse needs. For example, more service providers may offer high-quality AODA customer service training after the COVID-19 pandemic.

AODA Customer Service Training After the COVID-19 Pandemic

As service providers encourage customers to stay home and contact them remotely, they are changing their ways of doing business. For instance, providers may be:

  • Expanding their businesses online
  • Posting more online flyers or advertisements
  • Communicating more often by phone or email

In addition, service providers are offering more options for:

  • Delivery
  • Pick-up
  • Events or interactions through video-conferencing

In short, service providers have quickly begun to learn and practice new ways of serving and communicating with customers. Moreover, the leaders or supervisors of these organizations have trained their staff to follow new procedures, such as:

  • Requiring customers to maintain physical distancing
  • Supporting customers as they operate technology, such as websites or self-check-outs

In the same way, service providers can adapt just as proactively to provide their staff with high-quality training on best practices for serving customers with disabilities.

Current Requirements for AODA Customer Service Training

Under the Customer Service Standards of the AODA, service providers must teach workers and volunteers how to provide goods and services to customers with disabilities. Training must cover the following topics:

Moreover, providers may train workers using various formats, including:

  • Interactive workshops
  • Classroom settings
  • Online courses
  • handouts

The variety of training options allows providers to create their own training that relates AODA principles to the day-to-day activities in their organizations. For instance, restaurants may receive training on communicating that may include reading menus aloud or taking orders in writing.

However, this variety may create differences in the quality of the training workers receive. For instance, the different possible formats lend themselves to different levels of knowledge. A worker who attends a classroom session on accessibility will talk about course content with other trainees. This worker will likely gain much more understanding than a worker who is given a handout and does not look at it again. Moreover, there is no test requirement or other way of evaluating that a trainee has fully understood what accessibility means in their sector.

Improving Training Quality

Since customers with disabilities are increasing, AODA customer service training must meet these customers’ needs. In the past, service providers may have offered lower-quality training for many reasons, such as:

  • Lack of time
  • Lack of experience with people who have disabilities

However, providers have now succeeded in making the time to train their staff on new COVID-19 protocols. Moreover, leaders and supervisors have overcome their own lack of experience with these new protocols in order to train workers. These leaders and supervisors have researched or consulted experts to develop solutions to the problems the pandemic has posed for their businesses. Therefore, leaders and supervisors can continue to use these strategies in order to offer high-quality AODA customer service training after the COVID-19 pandemic.




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Customer Service After the COVID-19 Pandemic


As the COVID-19 pandemic progresses, we cheer ourselves by thinking of future socializing in-person. We also think about returning to work or activities we love. These hopes help us through the challenges of physical distancing. Moreover, these challenges show us that we can be more flexible or more creative than we thought we could. For instance, retail stores and other organizations have adapted to physical distancing requirements during the pandemic. Many of these adaptations are also practices that make customer service more accessible for customers with disabilities. In the post-COVID-19 future, more people may recognize the value of adapting service to meet customers’ diverse needs. Consequently, more service providers may offer accessible customer service after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Customer Service After the COVID-19 Pandemic

As businesses and other organizations encourage customers to contact them remotely, they are developing new service policies. For instance, some businesses are expanding their presence online. Moreover, they are also offering more options for delivery. For instance, businesses may reduce or waive delivery charges. In addition, they may outline new rules for contactless delivery. Likewise, they may develop ways to remotely provide services they once offered in person. For instance, they may encourage customers to contact them by phone, by email, or through their websites.

Similarly, businesses may create policies about where customers can pick up their purchases while remaining physically distant. Finally, they may make changes to their hours of operation. For example, they may designate certain hours only for seniors and people with disabilities.

Some of these strategies will continue to be useful after the COVID-19 pandemic. For example, flexible options for remote service or delivery will allow companies to do more business with people in distant locations. Likewise, these options make it possible for companies to serve people with disabilities even if their physical premises are not accessible.

Furthermore, businesses that have adapted rapidly to physical distancing may make other changes to improve their service. For example, businesses and other organizations could:

These and other changes make service accessible to more customers. When businesses and other organizations make these changes, they make their services more welcoming to customers of all abilities.




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