New Report Reveals Frightening New Problems with the Ford Government’s Plans for Rationing Life-Saving Critical Medical Care if Hospitals get Overwhelmed by Another COVID-19 Surge


ACCESSIBILITY FOR ONTARIANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT ALLIANCE
NEWS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 26, 2021 Toronto: There are frightening and indefensible new problems with the Ford Government’s plans for how to decide who lives and who dies if the COVID-19 pandemic overloads Ontario hospitals, leading to rationing or “triage” of life-saving critical care. This is revealed in an exhaustive new report made public today. This thoroughly researched report reveals that:

1. It is dangerous to relegate concern about Ontario’s critical care triage plans to the back burner, just because COVID infection rates are reducing and vaccines are gradually being distributed. There remains a real risk of another COVID-19 surge. A senior medical advisor to the Government advisor said on January 23, 2021 that such triage may already be taking place.

2. A seriously flawed, disability-discriminatory and highly objectionable online calculator has been created for triage doctors to determine who will be refused life-saving critical care during triage or rationing of critical care. Such an online calculator’s computation, based on a doctor’s keying in data, should never decide that a patient should be refused life-saving critical care they need. This is especially so when that online calculator discriminates against some patients based on their disability.

3. If hospitals start rationing or triaging critical care, there is a danger that some emergency medical technicians (EMTs) may improperly refuse to give a patient critical care they need and want before the patient even gets to the hospital an improper backdoor trickle-down form of critical care triage.

4. A transparently erroneous legal strategy has been devised for defending the legality of Ontario’s critical care triage plan. Triage doctors, hospitals and the Ontario Government are expected to argue that no one can sue them if a triage doctor refuses to give life-saving critical care to a patient who needs it and wants it, so long as they are following the January 13, 2021 Critical Care Triage Protocol (a protocol that is rife with serious problems that the AODA Alliance and other disability advocates have previously identified). They plan to say that because that document is called a “standard of care” for triage doctors (an inappropriate label for it), it provides a full defence. This new report shows that that legal defence strategy is fatally flawed.

5. A troubling January 23, 2021 webinar to train frontline critical care triage doctors wrongly minimizes the enormity of the role doctors would play, while they are making life-and-death decisions over which patients would get life-saving critical care, if critical care triage takes place. That webinar harmfully and wrongly tries to convince triage doctors not to worry about being sued, so long as they follow the January 13, 2021 Critical Care Triage Protocol. At the same time, that webinar did not alert frontline doctors to the serious disability discrimination and due process concerns that disability advocates have raised with the directions that those frontline doctors are being told to implement if critical care triage is to occur.

“We agree that Ontario must be prepared for the possibility of critical care triage, but Ontario’s plan must include a lawfully mandated triage protocol that does not violate the Charter of Rights or the Ontario Human Rights Code by discriminating against people with disabilities, who have already disproportionately suffered the hardships of the COVID-19 pandemic,” said David Lepofsky, Chair of the non-partisan AODA Alliance, which campaigns for accessibility for 2.6 million Ontarians with disabilities. “This report confirms that the Ford Government has been hearing from health professionals and their insurance representatives, but the Government needs to end its embargo on directly talking to disability community voices about this important issue. We’ve written the Ford Government, calling on it to rescind the disability-discriminatory January 13, 2021 Critical Care Triage Protocol.”

Contact: AODA Alliance Chair David Lepofsky, [email protected]

For more background on this issue, check out:
1. The AODA Alliance’s new February 25, 2021 independent report on Ontario’s plans for critical care triage if hospitals are overwhelmed by patients needing critical care, available at https://www.aodaalliance.org/whats-new/a-deeply-troubling-issue-of-life-and-death-an-independent-report-on-ontarios-seriously-flawed-plans-for-rationing-or-triage-of-critical-medical-care-if-covid-19-overwhelms-ontario-hospitals/ and the AODA Alliance’s February 25, 2021 letter to the Ford Government, sending it that report. 2. The January 13, 2021 triage protocol.
3. The Government’s earlier external advisory Bioethics Table’s September 11, 2020 draft critical care triage protocol, finally revealed last month.
4. The AODA Alliance website’s health care page, detailing its efforts to tear down barriers in the health care system facing patients with disabilities, and our COVID-19 page, detailing our efforts to address the needs of people with disabilities during the COVID-19 crisis.




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Trudeau responds to commissioner’s report on RCMP handling of information requests



Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said his government would be examining the recommendations by the information commissioner in a scathing report on the RCMP’s handling of access to information requests, saying they would then implement those that help restore Canadians’ confidence in the access to information system.



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New Report Reveals Corporate Lobbyists Feeding Frenzy At City Hall to Pressure Toronto City Council to Lift Ban on Electric Scooters That Endanger People with Disabilities


ACCESSIBILITY FOR ONTARIANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT ALLIANCE

NEWS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

New Report Reveals Corporate Lobbyists Feeding Frenzy At City Hall to Pressure Toronto City Council to Lift Ban on Electric Scooters That Endanger People with Disabilities

October 30, 2020 Toronto: Today, a new report by the non-partisan grassroots AODA Alliance pulls back the curtain to reveal the stunning behind-the-scenes high-price feeding frenzy of back-room pressure that corporate lobbyists for electric scooter (e-scooter) rental companies have flooded City Hall with for months. They are relentlessly pressuring City Hall to pass a by-law to lift the much-needed ban on e-scooters. The corporate lobbyists want to make money on e-scooter rentals, laughing all the way to the bank as seriously injured pedestrians sob all the way to hospital emergency rooms.

This new report gives insight into why in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic when other pressing issues should be a priority, Toronto’s municipal politicians are so seriously considering unleashing e-scooters in Toronto, despite their amply-documented dangers to people with disabilities, seniors and others. Key disability organizations vigourously oppose e-scooters, because of these proven dangers.

“All eyes are on Mayor John Tory. Corporate lobbyists are clearly spending piles of money to inundate City Hall and the Mayor’s office,” said David Lepofsky, chair of the non-partisan AODA Alliance that spearheads efforts to protect 2.6 million Ontarians with disabilities from the dangers that e-scooters cause. “We keep hearing that it will be Mayor John Tory that will ultimately decide if e-scooters will be inflicted on Torontonians. We need Mayor Tory to listen to us, the people who will be exposed to the dangers e-scooters create. He needs to stand up to the corporate lobbyists.”

This report shows that entries in Toronto’s official Lobbyist Registry, extracted below, filling fully 73 pages, reveal that in just the two years from June 2018 to the present, eight e-scooter rental companies and three lobbying firms have documented fully 1,384 contacts with City Hall in person, by phone, by virtual meeting or by email. Among these are at least 112 meetings with City officials and 1,153 emails. These figures only include contacts which corporate lobbyists opted to record in the Toronto Lobbyist Registry.

Amidst this onslaught of corporate lobbyists’ approaches are a dizzying 94 contacts with the Mayor’s Office, including 10 with Mayor Tory himself, 58 with the Mayor’s Senior Advisor, Legislative Affairs Daniela Magisano, 15 with Mayor Tory’s Director of Legislative Affairs Edward Birnbaum, 10 with his Chief of Staff Luke Robertson, and 1 with Mayor Tory’s Deputy Chief of Staff Courtney Glen.

As well, among these documented contacts are 368 contacts with members of City Council, 479 contacts with staff of members of council, as well as 352 contacts with the following City staff, among others (We surmise that the corporate lobbyists may not have reached a few entry-level file clerks):

  • Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team, Transportation Services: 62
  • Manager, Street Furniture Management, Transportation Services: 41
  • Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects, Transportation Services: 37
  • Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation Transportation Services: 36
  • Manager, Data & Analytics Transportation Services: 26
  • Manager, Transportation Policy & Innovation, Transportation Services: 25
  • Director, Policy & Innovation, Transportation Services: 22
  • Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education, Transportation Services: 18
  • General Manager, Transportation Services: 18
  • Manager Transportation Services: 18
  • Project Lead Environment, Policy & Research, Environment and Energy: 13
  • Director, Transportation Infrastructure Management, Transportation Services: 12
  • Manager, Policy and Research Environment & Energy: 10
  • Manager, Strategic Policy and Innovation, Transportation Services: 7
  • Manager, Cycling Infrastructure & Programs Transportation Services: 7

An e-scooter is a silent motor vehicle. A joy-rider with no license or training would be allowed to race around on an e-scooter at 20 kilometers an hour or faster. A Toronto City Staff report shows that e-scooters create real dangers to public safety in places that allow them. E-scooter riders and innocent pedestrians get seriously injured or killed. Check out a recent CBC report on e-scooter injuries suffered in Calgary.

The silent menace of e-scooters especially endanger seniors and people with disabilities, such as people who are blind or have low vision or balance issues, or whose disability makes them slower to scramble out of the way. A blind pedestrian can’t know when a silent e-scooter rockets toward them at over 20 KPH, driven by a fun-seeking unlicensed, untrained, uninsured, unhelmetted rider.

In cities where e-scooters are allowed, rental e-scooters, left strewn around public places, become mobility barriers to accessibility for people with physical disabilities. For people who are blind, deafblind or have low vision, those e-scooters become a serious, unexpected tripping hazard. E-scooters left on sidewalks create serious new accessibility barriers for people using a wheelchair, walker or other mobility device. An e-scooter can block them from continuing along an otherwise-accessible sidewalk.

On February 3, 2020, Toronto’s Accessibility Advisory Committee (appointed by the City) unanimously recommended to City Council not to allow e-scooters in Toronto because they create dangers for people with disabilities. On July 28, 2020, City Council voted on a motion to ask City staff to further research the concerns for people with disabilities arising from e-scooters. The motion passed, but only on a vote of 12 for, and 11 opposed.

“The City of Toronto should hold a major, extensive, open and accessible consultation to hear from Torontonians with disabilities, and Mayor Tory should himself lead these real-time consultations,” said Lepofsky. “So far, the City and the Mayor have not done so, despite City Council’s call for more information on the implications of e-scooters for people with disabilities, a motion that Mayor Tory himself supported.”

On July 28, why did fully 11 City Council members vote to oppose City Staff looking any further into the dangers that e-scooters create for people with disabilities? The Toronto Lobbyist Registry gives some insight. Of those 11 members of City Council, the e-scooter rental companies had 43 contacts with Councilor Layton, 25 with Councilor McKelvie and 21 with Councilor Colle. All three were among the 11 who voted against the needs of people with disabilities, and hence, in favour of the e-scooter rental companies and their corporate lobbyists.

Contact: AODA Alliance Chair David Lepofsky, [email protected]

Twitter: @aodaalliance

On July 28, 2020, AODA Alliance Chair David Lepofsky was interviewed on News Radio 1310 in Ottawa, on the problems with e-scooters that have already emerged shortly after Ottawa began its ill-considered pilot with e-scooters. We will have more to say on the e-scooters issue over the coming weeks. Below is set out an excerpt from an article on this in the July 29, 2020 Toronto Star. The history of this item at Toronto City Council is set out on its website at http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2020.IE14.10.

For more background:

  1. The AODA Alliance’s July 8, 2020 brief to the City of Toronto Infrastructure and Environment Committee, already endorsed by Spinal Cord Injury Ontario and the March of Dimes of Canada
  1. The open letter to all Ontario municipal councils from 11 major disability organizations, opposing e-scooters in Ontario, and
  1. A sampling of news reports on the serious injuries that e-scooters have caused in communities that permit them.
  1. The AODA Alliance e-scooters web page.

A Report of the Recorded Contacts by E-Scooter Rental Companies’ Corporate Lobbyists and Toronto City Hall Between June 2018 and October 2020

October 30, 2020

Prepared by the AODA Alliance

All information is taken from the official Toronto Lobbyists Registry.

Bird Canada

  1. January 21, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Ana Bailão of Ward 9 Davenport, a Member of Council.
  2. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Ana Bailão of Ward 9 Davenport, a Member of Council.
  3. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Ana Bailão of Ward 9 Davenport, a Member of Council.
  4. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Brad Bradford of Ward 19 Beaches-East York, a Member of Council.
  5. May 07, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Brad Bradford of Ward 19 Beaches-East York, a Member of Council.
  6. May 19, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Brad Bradford of Ward 19 Beaches-East York, a Member of Council.
  7. May 25, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Brad Bradford of Ward 19 Beaches-East York, a Member of Council.
  8. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  9. July 06, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  10. July 10, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  11. July 22, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mark Grimes of Ward 3 Etobicoke-Lakeshore, a Member of Council.
  12. March 26, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Cynthia Lai of Ward 23 Scarborough North, a Member of Council.
  13. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Cynthia Lai of Ward 23 Scarborough North, a Member of Council.
  14. January 28, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  15. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  16. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  17. May 06, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  18. May 25, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  19. May 30, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Josh Matlow of Ward 12 Toronto-St. Paul’s, a Member of Council.
  20. June 04, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Josh Matlow of Ward 12 Toronto-St. Paul’s, a Member of Council.
  21. December 11, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  22. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  23. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  24. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  25. September 25, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  26. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  27. February 11, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  28. April 14, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  29. April 22, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  30. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  31. May 06, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  32. May 19, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  33. May 25, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  34. July 10, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  35. November 01, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  36. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  37. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  38. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Michael Thompson of Ward 21 Scarborough Centre, a Member of Council.
  39. May 07, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Michael Thompson of Ward 21 Scarborough Centre, a Member of Council.
  40. October 22, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Kristyn Wong-Tam of Ward 13 Toronto Centre, a Member of Council.
  41. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Kristyn Wong-Tam of Ward 13 Toronto Centre, a Member of Council.
  42. April 07, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Anthony Tersigni of James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  43. May 06, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Anthony Tersigni of James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  44. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternack’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  45. February 11, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternack, a Staff of Member of Council.
  46. April 07, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  47. April 14, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  48. April 22, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  49. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  50. May 06, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  51. May 19, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  52. May 25, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  53. June 10, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  54. June 17, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  55. July 06, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  56. July 08, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  57. July 10, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  58. September 05, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  59. December 10, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  60. December 13, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  61. December 16, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  62. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  63. February 10, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  64. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  65. May 07, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  66. May 10, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  67. May 25, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  68. May 30, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  69. July 06, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  70. July 10, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  71. July 30, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  72. September 14, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  73. September 25, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  74. October 08, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Daniela Magisano of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  75. November 12, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with David Bellmore of Office of Councillor Colle, a Staff of Member of Council.
  76. July 08, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Edward Birnbaum of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  77. July 10, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Edward Birnbaum of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  78. July 22, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Edward Birnbaum of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  79. July 30, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Edward Birnbaum of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  80. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Ihor Wons of Michael Thompson’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  81. May 07, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Ihor Wons of Michael Thompson’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  82. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Jessica Monk of Denzil Minnan-Wong’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  83. December 11, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with John Sinclair of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  84. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to John Sinclair Jennifer McKelvie’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  85. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to John Sinclair Jennifer McKelvie’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  86. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Lisa Hoffman of Kristyn Wong-Tam’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  87. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Lola Dandybaeva of Mike Colle’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  88. July 06, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Lola Dandybaeva of Mike Colle’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  89. July 10, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Lola Dandybaeva of Mike Colle’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  90. May 25, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Luke Robertson of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  91. May 30, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Luke Robertson of the Mayor’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  92. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Matias deDovitiis of Anthony Perruzza’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  93. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Matias deDovitiis of Anthony Perruzza’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  94. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Michael Giles of Ana Bailao’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  95. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Michael Giles of Ana Bailao’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  96. March 26, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Nick Dominelli of Cynthia Lai’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  97. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Nick Dominelli of Cynthia Lai’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  98. November 01, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Rachel Scott of Office of Councillor Peruzza, a Staff of Member of Council.
  99. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Rishab Mehan of Brad Bradford’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  100. May 07, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Rishab Mehan of Brad Bradford’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  101. May 19, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Rishab Mehan of Brad Bradford’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  102. May 25, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Rishab Mehan of Brad Bradford’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  103. June 10, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Rishab Mehan of Brad Bradford’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  104. January 28, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Stephanie Nakitsas of Mike Layton’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  105. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Stephanie Nakitsas of Mike Layton’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  106. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Stephanie Nakitsas of Mike Layton’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  107. May 06, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Stephanie Nakitsas of Mike Layton’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  108. May 08, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Stephanie Nakitsas of Mike Layton’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  109. May 25, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Stephanie Nakitsas of Mike Layton’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  110. October 22, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Tristan Downe-Dewdney of Office of Councillor Wong-Tam, a Staff of Member of Council.
  111. May 19, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Vice-President, Stakeholder Relations of CreateTO, an Employee of a Local Board.
  112. June 10, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Vice-President, Stakeholder Relations of CreateTO, an Employee of a Local Board.
  113. June 17, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Vice-President, Stakeholder Relations of CreateTO, an Employee of a Local Board.
  114. December 13, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Director of Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  115. June 17, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Director, Transaction Services of Corporate Real Estate Management, an Employee of the City.
  116. December 10, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Executive Director of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  117. December 13, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Executive Director of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  118. December 16, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Executive Director of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  119. March 27, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Executive Director of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  120. May 25, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Executive Director of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  121. September 18, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  122. October 22, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  123. October 25, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  124. November 26, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  125. November 27, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  126. November 28, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call and sent an e-mail to the Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  127. December 10, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  128. December 13, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  129. December 16, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  130. January 10, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  131. January 20, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  132. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  133. March 27, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  134. April 07, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to the Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  135. April 24, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  136. May 25, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  137. September 18, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Senior Policy and Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  138. September 18, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Snr Project Mgr, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  139. October 22, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Snr Project Mgr, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  140. December 13, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Snr Project Mgr, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  141. December 16, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Snr Project Mgr, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  142. February 05, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Snr Project Mgr, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  143. March 27, 2020, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Snr Project Mgr, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  144. September 18, 2019, Stewart Lyons, Senior Officer of Bird Canada, met with Toronto Urban Fellow Research Associate of People, Equity & Human Rights, an Employee of the City.
  145. September 30, 2019, Ryan Lausman of Bird Canada, met with Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  146. September 18, 2019, Ryan Lausman of Bird Canada, met with Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  147. October 22, 2019, Ryan Lausman of Bird Canada, met with Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  148. October 25, 2019, Ryan Lausman of Bird Canada, met with Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  149. January 10, 2020, Ryan Lausman of Bird Canada, met with Manager, Street Furniture Management, City Wide of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  150. September 18, 2019, Ryan Lausman of Bird Canada, met with Senior Policy and Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  151. September 18, 2019, Ryan Lausman of Bird Canada, met with Snr Project Mgr, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  152. October 22, 2019, Ryan Lausman of Bird Canada, met with Snr Project Mgr, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  153. September 18, 2019, Ryan Lausman of Bird Canada, met with Toronto Urban Fellow Research Associate of People, Equity & Human Rights, an Employee of the City.
  154. January 28, 2020, Austin Spademan of Bird Canada, met with Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  155. February 03, 2020, Austin Spademan of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  156. April 07, 2020, Austin Spademan of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  157. February 11, 2020, Austin Spademan of Bird Canada, met with James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  158. February 11, 2020, Austin Spademan of Bird Canada, met with Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  159. February 05, 2020, Austin Spademan of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Samantha Vite of Mike Layton’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  160. January 28, 2020, Austin Spademan of Bird Canada, met with Stephanie Nakitsas of Mike Layton’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  161. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Paul Ainslie of Ward 24 Scarborough-Guildwood, a Member of Council.
  162. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Paul Ainslie of Ward 24 Scarborough-Guildwood, a Member of Council.
  163. October 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Paul Ainslie of Ward 24 Scarborough-Guildwood, a Member of Council.
  164. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Ana Bailão of Ward 9 Davenport, a Member of Council.
  165. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Ana Bailão of Ward 9 Davenport, a Member of Council.
  166. July 17, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Brad Bradford of Ward 19 Beaches-East York, a Member of Council.
  167. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Brad Bradford of Ward 19 Beaches-East York, a Member of Council.
  168. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Shelley Carroll of Ward 17 Don Valley North, a Member of Council.
  169. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Shelley Carroll of Ward 17 Don Valley North, a Member of Council.
  170. July 24, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  171. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  172. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  173. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Gary Crawford of Ward 20 Scarborough Southwest, a Member of Council.
  174. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Gary Crawford of Ward 20 Scarborough Southwest, a Member of Council.
  175. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Joe Cressy of Ward 10 Spadina-Fort York, a Member of Council.
  176. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Joe Cressy of Ward 10 Spadina-Fort York, a Member of Council.
  177. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to John Filion of Ward 18 Willowdale, a Member of Council.
  178. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to John Filion of Ward 18 Willowdale, a Member of Council.
  179. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Paula Fletcher of Ward 14 Toronto-Danforth, a Member of Council.
  180. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Paula Fletcher of Ward 14 Toronto-Danforth, a Member of Council.
  181. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Michael Ford of Ward 1 Etobicoke North, a Member of Council.
  182. July 23, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Michael Ford of Ward 1 Etobicoke North, a Member of Council.
  183. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Michael Ford of Ward 1 Etobicoke North, a Member of Council.
  184. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mark Grimes of Ward 3 Etobicoke-Lakeshore, a Member of Council.
  185. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mark Grimes of Ward 3 Etobicoke-Lakeshore, a Member of Council.
  186. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Stephen Holyday of Ward 2 Etobicoke Centre, a Member of Council.
  187. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Stephen Holyday of Ward 2 Etobicoke Centre, a Member of Council.
  188. October 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Stephen Holyday of Ward 2 Etobicoke Centre, a Member of Council.
  189. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Cynthia Lai of Ward 23 Scarborough North, a Member of Council.
  190. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Cynthia Lai of Ward 23 Scarborough North, a Member of Council.
  191. July 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  192. July 07, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  193. July 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  194. July 10, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  195. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  196. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  197. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Josh Matlow of Ward 12 Toronto-St. Paul’s, a Member of Council.
  198. July 27, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Josh Matlow of Ward 12 Toronto-St. Paul’s, a Member of Council.
  199. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Josh Matlow of Ward 12 Toronto-St. Paul’s, a Member of Council.
  200. July 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  201. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  202. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  203. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  204. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  205. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Frances Nunziata of Ward 5 York South-Weston, a Member of Council.
  206. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Frances Nunziata of Ward 5 York South-Weston, a Member of Council.
  207. July 17, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  208. July 20, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  209. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  210. October 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  211. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  212. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  213. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  214. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Jaye Robinson of Ward 15 Don Valley West, a Member of Council.
  215. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Michael Thompson of Ward 21 Scarborough Centre, a Member of Council.
  216. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Michael Thompson of Ward 21 Scarborough Centre, a Member of Council.
  217. August 31, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mayor John Tory, a Member of Council.
  218. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mayor John Tory, a Member of Council.
  219. August 24, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Kristyn Wong-Tam of Ward 13 Toronto Centre, a Member of Council.
  220. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aaron Prance of Office of Councillor Grimes, a Staff of Member of Council.
  221. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aaron Prance of Office of Councillor Grimes, a Staff of Member of Council.
  222. July 22, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Adrian Martins of Office of Councillor Bailao, a Staff of Member of Council.
  223. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Adrian Martins of Office of Councillor Bailao, a Staff of Member of Council.
  224. July 22, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Alex Amelin of Office of Councillor Ainslie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  225. July 24, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Alex Amelin of Office of Councillor Ainslie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  226. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Alex Amelin of Office of Councillor Ainslie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  227. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Amalia Stefanopoulos of Office of Councillor Minnan-Wong, a Staff of Member of Council.
  228. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Amalia Stefanopoulos of Office of Councillor Minnan-Wong, a Staff of Member of Council.
  229. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Andrew Athanasiu of Office of Councillor Matlow, a Staff of Member of Council.
  230. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Antonette Dinovo of Office of Councillor Ainslie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  231. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Antonette Dinovo of Office of Councillor Ainslie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  232. July 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of Member of Council.
  233. July 17, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of Member of Council.
  234. July 20, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of Member of Council.
  235. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of Member of Council.
  236. October 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of Member of Council.
  237. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of Member of Council.
  238. October 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of Member of Council.
  239. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Brent Gilliard of Office of Councillor Cressy, a Staff of Member of Council.
  240. July 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Brett McCandless of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  241. July 24, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Caroline Duffy of Office of Councillor Colle, a Staff of Member of Council.
  242. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Caroline Duffy of Office of Councillor Colle, a Staff of Member of Council.
  243. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Caroline Duffy of Office of Councillor Colle, a Staff of Member of Council.
  244. July 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call and sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  245. July 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  246. August 31, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  247. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  248. September 22, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  249. October 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call and sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  250. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  251. October 20, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  252. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daryl Finlayson of Office of Councillor Fletcher, a Staff of Member of Council.
  253. July 23, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daryl Finlayson of Office of Councillor Fletcher, a Staff of Member of Council.
  254. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Daryl Finlayson of Office of Councillor Fletcher, a Staff of Member of Council.
  255. July 20, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Diana Gonzalez of Office of Councillor Bradford, a Staff of Member of Council.
  256. July 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call and sent an e-mail to Edward Birnbaum of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  257. July 22, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Edward Birnbaum of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  258. August 31, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Edward Birnbaum of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  259. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Edward Birnbaum of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  260. September 22, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Edward Birnbaum of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  261. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Edward Birnbaum of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  262. October 20, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Edward Birnbaum of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  263. July 17, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Hector Alonso of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of Member of Council.
  264. July 20, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Hector Alonso of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of Member of Council.
  265. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Hector Alonso of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of Member of Council.
  266. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call and sent an e-mail to Ihor Wons of Office of Councillor Thompson, a Staff of Member of Council.
  267. July 22, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Ihor Wons of Office of Councillor Thompson, a Staff of Member of Council.
  268. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Ihor Wons of Office of Councillor Thompson, a Staff of Member of Council.
  269. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to James Murphy of Office of Councillor Lai, a Staff of Member of Council.
  270. July 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Jessica Luke-Smith of Office of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of Member of Council.
  271. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Jessica Monk of Office of Councillor Minnan-Wong, a Staff of Member of Council.
  272. July 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Jessica Pointon of Office of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of Member of Council.
  273. July 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Jessica Pointon of Office of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of Member of Council.
  274. July 07, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Jessica Pointon of Office of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of Member of Council.
  275. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Jessica Pointon of Office of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of Member of Council.
  276. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Joan Wilson of Office of Councillor Cressy, a Staff of Member of Council.
  277. July 23, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Joan Wilson of Office of Councillor Cressy, a Staff of Member of Council.
  278. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Joan Wilson of Office of Councillor Cressy, a Staff of Member of Council.
  279. July 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to John Sinclair of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  280. July 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to John Sinclair of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  281. July 10, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call and sent an e-mail to John Sinclair of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  282. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to John Sinclair of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  283. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Jonathan Kent of Office of Councillor Ford, a Staff of Member of Council.
  284. July 23, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Jonathan Kent of Office of Councillor Ford, a Staff of Member of Council.
  285. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Jonathan Kent of Office of Councillor Ford, a Staff of Member of Council.
  286. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Lesley Burlie of Office of Councillor Robinson, a Staff of Member of Council.
  287. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Lola Dandybaeva of Office of Councillor Colle, a Staff of Member of Council.
  288. August 24, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Lorraine Hewitt of Office of Councillor Wong-Tam, a Staff of Member of Council.
  289. September 22, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Luke Robertson of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  290. October 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Luke Robertson of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  291. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Luke Robertson of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  292. October 20, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Luke Robertson of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  293. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Maham Aqil of Office of Councillor Crawford, a Staff of Member of Council.
  294. July 23, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Maham Aqil of Office of Councillor Crawford, a Staff of Member of Council.
  295. July 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Marco Bianchi of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of Member of Council.
  296. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Marco Bianchi of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of Member of Council.
  297. July 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Matias de Dovitiis of Office of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of Member of Council.
  298. July 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Matias de Dovitiis of Office of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of Member of Council.
  299. July 07, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Matias de Dovitiis of Office of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of Member of Council.
  300. July 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Matias de Dovitiis of Office of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of Member of Council.
  301. July 10, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Matias de Dovitiis of Office of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of Member of Council.
  302. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Matias de Dovitiis of Office of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of Member of Council.
  303. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Matias de Dovitiis of Office of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of Member of Council.
  304. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Miran Markovic of Office of Councillor Nunziata, a Staff of Member of Council.
  305. July 23, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Miran Markovic of Office of Councillor Nunziata, a Staff of Member of Council.
  306. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Miran Markovic of Office of Councillor Nunziata, a Staff of Member of Council.
  307. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Monique Lisi of Office of Councillor Crawford, a Staff of Member of Council.
  308. July 23, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Mustapha Khamissa of Office of Councillor Carroll, a Staff of Member of Council.
  309. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Nicholas Dominelli of Office of Councillor Lai, a Staff of Member of Council.
  310. July 27, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Nicholas Dominelli of Office of Councillor Lai, a Staff of Member of Council.
  311. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Nicholas Gallant of Office of Councillor Bailao, a Staff of Member of Council.
  312. July 22, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Nicholas Gallant of Office of Councillor Bailao, a Staff of Member of Council.
  313. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Nicholas Gallant of Office of Councillor Bailao, a Staff of Member of Council.
  314. July 23, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Olivia Klasios of Office of Councillor Robinson, a Staff of Member of Council.
  315. July 17, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Paul Bieksa of Office of Councillor Bradford, a Staff of Member of Council.
  316. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Paul Bieksa of Office of Councillor Bradford, a Staff of Member of Council.
  317. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Paula Goncalves of Office of Councillor Lai, a Staff of Member of Council.
  318. July 22, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Paula Goncalves of Office of Councillor Lai, a Staff of Member of Council.
  319. July 27, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Paula Goncalves of Office of Councillor Lai, a Staff of Member of Council.
  320. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Paula Goncalves of Office of Councillor Lai, a Staff of Member of Council.
  321. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Rebecca Guida of Office of Councillor Grimes, a Staff of Member of Council.
  322. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Rebecca Guida of Office of Councillor Grimes, a Staff of Member of Council.
  323. July 17, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Rishab Mehan of Office of Councillor Bradford, a Staff of Member of Council.
  324. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Rishab Mehan of Office of Councillor Bradford, a Staff of Member of Council.
  325. August 24, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Robyn Bidgood of Office of Councillor Wong-Tam, a Staff of Member of Council.
  326. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Ryan Lo of Office of Councillor Carroll, a Staff of Member of Council.
  327. July 23, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Ryan Lo of Office of Councillor Carroll, a Staff of Member of Council.
  328. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Ryan Lo of Office of Councillor Carroll, a Staff of Member of Council.
  329. July 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Samantha Vite of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of Member of Council.
  330. July 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Samantha Vite of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of Member of Council.
  331. July 07, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Samantha Vite of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of Member of Council.
  332. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Sarah Barber of Office of Councillor Filion, a Staff of Member of Council.
  333. July 23, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Sarah Barber of Office of Councillor Filion, a Staff of Member of Council.
  334. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Sarah Barber of Office of Councillor Filion, a Staff of Member of Council.
  335. July 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Scott Morphet of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  336. July 07, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Scott Morphet of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  337. July 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Scott Morphet of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  338. July 10, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Scott Morphet of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  339. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Scott Morphet of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  340. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Scott Morphet of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  341. October 20, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Scott Morphet of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of Member of Council.
  342. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Sheila Henderson of Office of Councillor Holyday, a Staff of Member of Council.
  343. July 22, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Sheila Henderson of Office of Councillor Holyday, a Staff of Member of Council.
  344. July 24, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Sheila Henderson of Office of Councillor Holyday, a Staff of Member of Council.
  345. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Sheila Henderson of Office of Councillor Holyday, a Staff of Member of Council.
  346. July 22, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Shima Bhana of Office of Councillor Ford, a Staff of Member of Council.
  347. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Slavisa Mijatovic of Office of Councillor Matlow, a Staff of Member of Council.
  348. July 23, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Slavisa Mijatovic of Office of Councillor Matlow, a Staff of Member of Council.
  349. July 27, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Slavisa Mijatovic of Office of Councillor Matlow, a Staff of Member of Council.
  350. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Slavisa Mijatovic of Office of Councillor Matlow, a Staff of Member of Council.
  351. July 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Stephanie Nakitsas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of Member of Council.
  352. July 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Stephanie Nakitsas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of Member of Council.
  353. July 07, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call and sent an e-mail to Stephanie Nakitsas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of Member of Council.
  354. July 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Stephanie Nakitsas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of Member of Council.
  355. July 10, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Stephanie Nakitsas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of Member of Council.
  356. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Stephanie Nakitsas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of Member of Council.
  357. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Stephanie Nakitsas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of Member of Council.
  358. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Susan Serran of Office of Councillor Fletcher, a Staff of Member of Council.
  359. July 23, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Susan Serran of Office of Councillor Fletcher, a Staff of Member of Council.
  360. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Susan Serran of Office of Councillor Fletcher, a Staff of Member of Council.
  361. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Tom Gleason of Office of Councillor Carroll, a Staff of Member of Council.
  362. July 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Trent Jennett of Office of Councillor Ford, a Staff of Member of Council.
  363. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Trent Jennett of Office of Councillor Ford, a Staff of Member of Council.
  364. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to William Burtch of Office of Councillor Crawford, a Staff of Member of Council.
  365. September 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Associate Lead – Government & Financial Renewal of Toronto Office of Recovery & Rebuild, an Employee of the City.
  366. October 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Associate Lead – Government & Financial Renewal of Toronto Office of Recovery & Rebuild, an Employee of the City.
  367. September 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Coordinator of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  368. September 25, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, an Employee of the City.
  369. July 22, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Director of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  370. August 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Director of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  371. September 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Director of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  372. September 09, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Director of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  373. October 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Director of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  374. September 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Director, Project Design & Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  375. October 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Director, Project Design & Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  376. October 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to Edward Birnbaum of Office of Mayor Tory, an Employee of the City.
  377. July 22, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  378. August 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  379. August 31, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  380. September 09, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  381. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  382. October 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  383. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  384. October 20, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  385. July 22, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  386. July 27, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  387. July 30, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  388. August 12, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  389. August 18, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  390. August 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  391. August 31, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  392. September 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  393. September 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  394. September 09, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  395. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  396. September 18, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  397. September 28, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  398. October 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  399. October 02, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  400. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  401. October 20, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  402. September 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Project Lead of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  403. October 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Project Lead of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  404. October 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Project Lead of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  405. July 30, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  406. July 31, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to the Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  407. August 12, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  408. July 22, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  409. July 27, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  410. July 30, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call and sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  411. July 31, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  412. August 12, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  413. August 18, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  414. August 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  415. August 31, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  416. September 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  417. September 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  418. September 09, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  419. September 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  420. September 18, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  421. September 28, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  422. October 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  423. October 02, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  424. October 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  425. October 20, 2020, Chris Schafer of Bird Canada, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  426. October 20, 2020, John Bitove of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Michael Thompson of Ward 21 Scarborough Centre, a Member of Council.
  427. October 21, 2020, John Bitove of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  428. October 26, 2020, John Bitove of Bird Canada, made a telephone call to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  429. October 27, 2020, John Bitove of Bird Canada, sent an E-mail to Joe Cressy of Ward 10 Spadina-Fort York, a Member of Council.
  430. October 27, 2020, John Bitove of Bird Canada, sent an E-mail to Paula Fletcher of Ward 14 Toronto-Danforth, a Member of Council.
  431. October 27, 2020, John Bitove of Bird Canada, sent an E-mail to Andrew Athanasiu of Josh Matlow’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.

Neutron Holdings Inc. (Publicly known as “Lime”)

  1. June 18, 2018, Gabriel Scheer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Jon Burnside of Ward 26 Don Valley West, a Member of Council.
  2. June 20, 2018, Gabriel Scheer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Christin Carmichael Greb of Ward 16 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  3. June 20, 2018, Gabriel Scheer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Mike Layton of Ward 19 Trinity-Spadina, a Member of Council.
  4. April 15, 2020, Gabriel Scheer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  5. June 20, 2018, Gabriel Scheer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Gord Perks of Ward 14 Parkdale-High Park, a Member of Council.
  6. June 18, 2018, Gabriel Scheer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Michael Thompson of Ward 37 Scarborough Centre, a Member of Council.
  7. June 20, 2018, Gabriel Scheer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Manager, Cycling Infras & Programs of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  8. June 20, 2018, Gabriel Scheer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Program Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  9. July 26, 2018, Nico Probst of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Rachel Van Fraassen of Office of Councillor Jaye Robinson, Ward 25, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  10. July 26, 2018, Nico Probst of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Siri Agrell of The Mayor’s Office, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  11. July 07, 2020, Michael Markevich of Neutron Holdings Inc., had a teleconference with Matias de Dovitiis of Councillor Anthony Perruzza, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  12. October 22, 2019, Michael Markevich of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Manager, Transportation Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  13. January 10, 2020, Michael Markevich of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Manager, Transportation Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  14. October 22, 2019, Michael Markevich of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Program Designer (Toronto Urban Fellow) of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  15. January 10, 2020, Michael Markevich of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Program Designer (Toronto Urban Fellow) of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  16. October 22, 2019, Michael Markevich of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Senior Policy and Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  17. October 22, 2019, Michael Markevich of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  18. January 10, 2020, Michael Markevich of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  19. April 21, 2020, Calvin Thigpen of Neutron Holdings Inc., webinar James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  20. April 21, 2020, Calvin Thigpen of Neutron Holdings Inc., webinar Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  21. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paul Ainslie of Ward 24 Scarborough-Guildwood, a Member of Council.
  22. February 26, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paul Ainslie of Ward 24 Scarborough-Guildwood, a Member of Council.
  23. October 07, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paul Ainslie of Ward 24 Scarborough-Guildwood, a Member of Council.
  24. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ana Bailão of Ward 9 Davenport, a Member of Council.
  25. February 26, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ana Bailão of Ward 9 Davenport, a Member of Council.
  26. October 29, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ana Bailão of Ward 9 Davenport, a Member of Council.
  27. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Brad Bradford of Ward 19 Beaches-East York, a Member of Council.
  28. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Brad Bradford of Ward 19 Beaches-East York, a Member of Council.
  29. October 29, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Brad Bradford of Ward 19 Beaches-East York, a Member of Council.
  30. April 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Brad Bradford of Ward 19 Beaches-East York, a Member of Council.
  31. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Shelley Carroll of Ward 17 Don Valley North, a Member of Council.
  32. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Shelley Carroll of Ward 17 Don Valley North, a Member of Council.
  33. April 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Shelley Carroll of Ward 17 Don Valley North, a Member of Council.
  34. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  35. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  36. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  37. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  38. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Gary Crawford of Ward 20 Scarborough Southwest, a Member of Council.
  39. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Gary Crawford of Ward 20 Scarborough Southwest, a Member of Council.
  40. October 29, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Gary Crawford of Ward 20 Scarborough Southwest, a Member of Council.
  41. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Joe Cressy of Ward 10 Spadina-Fort York, a Member of Council.
  42. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Joe Cressy of Ward 10 Spadina-Fort York, a Member of Council.
  43. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Filion of Ward 18 Willowdale, a Member of Council.
  44. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Filion of Ward 18 Willowdale, a Member of Council.
  45. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Filion of Ward 18 Willowdale, a Member of Council.
  46. October 29, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Filion of Ward 18 Willowdale, a Member of Council.
  47. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paula Fletcher of Ward 14 Toronto-Danforth, a Member of Council.
  48. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paula Fletcher of Ward 14 Toronto-Danforth, a Member of Council.
  49. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paula Fletcher of Ward 14 Toronto-Danforth, a Member of Council.
  50. October 29, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paula Fletcher of Ward 14 Toronto-Danforth, a Member of Council.
  51. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Michael Ford of Ward 1 Etobicoke North, a Member of Council.
  52. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Michael Ford of Ward 1 Etobicoke North, a Member of Council.
  53. March 14, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Michael Ford of Ward 1 Etobicoke North, a Member of Council.
  54. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Michael Ford of Ward 1 Etobicoke North, a Member of Council.
  55. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mark Grimes of Ward 3 Etobicoke-Lakeshore, a Member of Council.
  56. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mark Grimes of Ward 3 Etobicoke-Lakeshore, a Member of Council.
  57. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephen Holyday of Ward 2 Etobicoke Centre, a Member of Council.
  58. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephen Holyday of Ward 2 Etobicoke Centre, a Member of Council.
  59. April 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Stephen Holyday of Ward 2 Etobicoke Centre, a Member of Council.
  60. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jim Karygiannis of Ward 22 Scarborough-Agincourt, a Member of Council.
  61. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jim Karygiannis of Ward 22 Scarborough-Agincourt, a Member of Council.
  62. March 13, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Jim Karygiannis of Ward 22 Scarborough-Agincourt, a Member of Council.
  63. March 21, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jim Karygiannis of Ward 22 Scarborough-Agincourt, a Member of Council.
  64. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Cynthia Lai of Ward 23 Scarborough North, a Member of Council.
  65. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Cynthia Lai of Ward 23 Scarborough North, a Member of Council.
  66. April 11, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Cynthia Lai of Ward 23 Scarborough North, a Member of Council.
  67. April 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Cynthia Lai of Ward 23 Scarborough North, a Member of Council.
  68. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  69. March 13, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  70. April 18, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  71. September 18, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  72. September 30, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  73. October 01, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  74. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  75. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  76. March 04, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  77. March 25, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  78. April 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  79. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Josh Matlow of Ward 12 Toronto-St. Paul’s, a Member of Council.
  80. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Josh Matlow of Ward 12 Toronto-St. Paul’s, a Member of Council.
  81. March 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Josh Matlow of Ward 12 Toronto-St. Paul’s, a Member of Council.
  82. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  83. March 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  84. September 18, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  85. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  86. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  87. March 04, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  88. March 25, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  89. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  90. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  91. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  92. March 13, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  93. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  94. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  95. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Frances Nunziata of Ward 5 York South-Weston, a Member of Council.
  96. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Frances Nunziata of Ward 5 York South-Weston, a Member of Council.
  97. March 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Frances Nunziata of Ward 5 York South-Weston, a Member of Council.
  98. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Frances Nunziata of Ward 5 York South-Weston, a Member of Council.
  99. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  100. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  101. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  102. August 23, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  103. August 27, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  104. September 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  105. September 30, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  106. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  107. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  108. March 02, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  109. March 25, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  110. April 02, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  111. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  112. April 16, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  113. April 24, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  114. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Gord Perks of Ward 4 Parkdale-High Park, a Member of Council.
  115. February 26, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Gord Perks of Ward 4 Parkdale-High Park, a Member of Council.
  116. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  117. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  118. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  119. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  120. March 25, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  121. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jaye Robinson of Ward 15 Don Valley West, a Member of Council.
  122. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Kristyn Wong-Tam of Ward 13 Toronto Centre, a Member of Council.
  123. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Kristyn Wong-Tam of Ward 13 Toronto Centre, a Member of Council.
  124. January 07, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Kristyn Wong-Tam of Ward 13 Toronto Centre, a Member of Council.
  125. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Kristyn Wong-Tam of Ward 13 Toronto Centre, a Member of Council.
  126. March 27, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., connected via social media with Kristyn Wong-Tam of Ward 13 Toronto Centre, a Member of Council.
  127. April 16, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Kristyn Wong-Tam of Ward 13 Toronto Centre, a Member of Council.
  128. April 11, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Abdullah Sherif of Office of Councillor Lai, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  129. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Amalia Stefanopoulos of Office of Councillor Minnan-Wong, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  130. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Amalia Stefanopoulos of Councillor Minnan-Wong, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  131. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Amalia Stefanopoulos of Councillor Minnan-Wong, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  132. February 28, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Amalia Stefanopoulos of Councillor Minnan-Wong, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  133. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Amalia Stefanopoulos of Councillor Minnan-Wong, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  134. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ani Dergalstanian of Office of Councillor Carroll, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  135. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Anthony Ferrari of Office of Councillor Nunziata, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  136. March 09, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Anthony Tersigni of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  137. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Antonette DiNovo of Office of Councillor Ainslie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  138. February 28, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Antonette DiNovo of Office of Councillor Ainslie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  139. October 07, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Antonette DiNovo of Office of Councillor Ainslie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  140. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Aytakin Mohammadi of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  141. March 09, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Aytakin Mohammadi of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  142. March 25, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Aytakin Mohammadi of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  143. April 02, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Aytakin Mohammadi of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  144. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Aytakin Mohammadi of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  145. April 16, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Aytakin Mohammadi of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  146. April 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Aytakin Mohammadi of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  147. March 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Brandon Stevens of Office of Councillor Colle, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  148. March 13, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Brandon Stevens of Office of Councillor Colle, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  149. March 14, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Brandon Stevens of Office of Councillor Colle, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  150. April 02, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with and sent an email to Brandon Stevens of Office of Councillor Colle, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  151. April 22, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Brandon Stevens of Office of Councillor Colle, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  152. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Brett.McCandless of Councillor Jennifer McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  153. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Caroline Duffy of Office of Councillor Colle, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  154. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Caroline Duffy of Councillor Mike Colle, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  155. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Caroline Duffy of Councillor Mike Colle, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  156. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Caroline Duffy of Councillor Colle, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  157. April 22, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Courtney Glen of The Mayor’s Office, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  158. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  159. April 22, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  160. July 24, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  161. July 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with and sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  162. August 30, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  163. September 09, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  164. September 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  165. September 17, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  166. September 18, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  167. October 11, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call and sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  168. October 17, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  169. October 18, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call and sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  170. October 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with and sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  171. November 07, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  172. November 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  173. January 07, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  174. January 10, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  175. February 05, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Office of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  176. February 11, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Mayor John Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  177. February 14, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Mayor John Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  178. February 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Mayor John Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  179. February 20, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Daniela Magisano of Mayor John Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  180. March 25, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Mayor John Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  181. April 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Mayor John Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  182. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Mayor John Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  183. March 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Diana Carella of Office of Councillor Matlow, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  184. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Diana Carella of Office of Councillor Matlow, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  185. March 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with and sent an email to Dino Alic of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  186. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Dino Alic of Councillor Jennifer McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  187. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Fertaa Yieleh-Chireh of Office of Councillor Matlow, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  188. March 25, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Hector Alonso of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  189. April 02, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Hector Alonso of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  190. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Hector Alonso of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  191. April 16, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Hector Alonso of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  192. April 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Hector Alonso of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  193. September 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Hilary Burke of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  194. September 30, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Hilary Burke of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  195. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ihor Wons of Office of Councillor Thompson, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  196. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jacob Katz of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  197. March 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jacob Katz of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  198. March 13, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jacob Katz of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  199. April 22, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jacob Katz of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  200. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jessica Luke-Smith of Office of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  201. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jessica Luke-Smith of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  202. March 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with and sent an email to John Sinclair of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  203. April 22, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Sinclair of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  204. September 18, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Sinclair of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  205. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Sinclair of Councillor Jennifer McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  206. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Sinclair of Councillor Jennifer McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  207. March 04, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with John Sinclair of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  208. March 25, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Sinclair of Councillor Jennifer McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  209. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Sinclair of Councillor Jennifer McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  210. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jonathan Kent of Office of Councillor Ford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  211. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Karen Duffy of Office of Councillor Perks, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  212. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Kim Edgar of Office of Councillor Grimes, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  213. March 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Kim Edgar of Office of Councillor Grimes, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  214. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Lesley Burlie of Office of Councillor Robinson, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  215. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Lia Brewer of Office of Councillor Cressy, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  216. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Lisa Rainford of Office of Councillor Nunziata, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  217. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Lola Dandybaeva of Councillor Mike Colle, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  218. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Lorraine Hewitt of Office of Councillor Wong-Tam, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  219. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Lorraine Hewitt of Office of Councillor Wong-Tam, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  220. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Lorraine Hewitt of Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  221. February 18, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Lorraine Hewitt of Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  222. February 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Lorraine Hewitt of Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  223. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with and sent an email to Lorraine Hewitt of Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  224. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Maham Aqil of Office of Councillor Crawford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  225. October 29, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Maham Aqil of Office of Councillor Crawford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  226. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Marco Bianchi of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  227. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Matias de Dovitiis of Councillor Anthony Perruzza, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  228. March 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with and sent an email to Matias de Dovitiis of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  229. March 25, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Matias de Dovitiis of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  230. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Matias de Dovitiis of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  231. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Megan Poole of Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  232. September 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Michelle Zaslavsky of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  233. September 30, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Michelle Zaslavsky of Office of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  234. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Michelle Zaslavsky of Councillor James Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  235. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Michelle Zaslavsky of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  236. March 02, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call and sent an email to Michelle Zaslavsky of Councillor Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  237. April 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Nicholas Dominelli of Councillor Cynthia Lai, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  238. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Nikolaos Mantas of Office of Councillor Karygiannis, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  239. March 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Nikolaos Mantas of Office of Councillor Karygiannis, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  240. March 21, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Nikolaos Mantas of Office of Councillor Karygiannis, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  241. February 26, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paul Bieksa of Office of Councillor Bradford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  242. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paul Bieksa of Office of Councillor Bradford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  243. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paul Bieksa of Office of Councillor Bradford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  244. October 29, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paul Bieksa of Office of Councillor Bradford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  245. April 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paul Bieksa of Councillor Brad Bradford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  246. April 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paul Bieksa of Councillor Brad Bradford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  247. April 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paula Goncalves of Councillor Cynthia Lai, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  248. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Rachel Thompson of Office of Councillor Robinson, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  249. April 03, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Rishab Mehan of Councillor Brad Bradford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  250. April 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Rishab Mehan of Councillor Brad Bradford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  251. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Robert Cerjanec of Office of Councillor Bailao, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  252. February 26, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Robert Cerjanec of Office of Councillor Bailao, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  253. March 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Robyn Bidgood of Office of Councillor Wong-Tam, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  254. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Robyn Bidgood of Office of Councillor Wong-Tam, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  255. February 11, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Robyn Bidgood of Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  256. February 18, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Robyn Bidgood of Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  257. February 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Robyn Bidgood of Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  258. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Robyn Bidgood of Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  259. November 09, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Rohan Balram of Office of Councillor Crawford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  260. November 16, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Rohan Balram of Office of Councillor Crawford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  261. April 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Ryan Lo of Office of Councillor Carroll, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  262. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ryan Pyne of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  263. March 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with and sent an email to Ryan Pyne of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  264. April 22, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ryan Pyne of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  265. September 18, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ryan Pyne of Office of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  266. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ryan Pyne of Councillor Jennifer McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  267. March 25, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ryan Pyne of Councillor Jennifer McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  268. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ryan Pyne of Councillor Jennifer McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  269. February 27, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Samantha Vite of Councillor Mike Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  270. February 28, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Samantha Vite of Councillor Mike Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  271. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Sarah Barber of Office of Councillor Filion, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  272. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Sarah Barber of Office of Councillor Filion, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  273. October 29, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Sarah Barber of Office of Councillor Filion, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  274. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Sheila Henderson of Office of Councillor Holyday, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  275. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Shima Bhana of Office of Councillor Ford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  276. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Slavisa Mijatovic of Office of Councillor Matlow, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  277. March 13, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with and sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  278. March 14, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  279. April 16, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call and sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  280. April 18, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call and sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  281. May 14, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  282. September 18, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  283. September 30, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call and sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  284. October 01, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  285. February 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Councillor Mike Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  286. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Councillor Mike Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  287. March 04, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Stephanie Nakitsas of Councillor Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  288. March 25, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Councillor Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  289. April 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Councillor Mike Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  290. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Councillor Mike Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  291. March 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Susan Baker of Office of Councillor Fletcher, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  292. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Susan Baker of Office of Councillor Fletcher, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  293. November 16, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Susan Baker of Office of Councillor Fletcher, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  294. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Susan Serran of Office of Councillor Fletcher, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  295. October 29, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Susan Serran of Office of Councillor Fletcher, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  296. July 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to William Burtch of Office of Councillor Crawford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  297. November 09, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to William Burtch of Office of Councillor Crawford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  298. November 16, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to William Burtch of Office of Councillor Crawford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  299. May 02, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mostafa Omran of Toronto Transit Commission (TTC), a Member of a Local Board.
  300. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Acting Director, Transport. Infrastructure Mgmt. of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  301. February 27, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Acting Director, Transport. Infrastructure Mgmt. of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  302. April 15, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Acting Director, Transport. Infrastructure Mgmt. of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  303. May 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Acting Director, Transport. Infrastructure Mgmt. of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  304. November 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Administrative Assistant 2 of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  305. November 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Administrative Assistant 2 of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  306. March 13, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  307. April 15, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  308. May 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  309. June 10, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  310. June 13, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  311. June 21, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  312. June 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  313. July 09, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  314. August 14, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  315. October 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  316. November 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  317. December 02, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  318. January 07, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  319. February 04, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  320. March 05, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  321. April 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  322. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  323. April 08, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Economic Support and Recovery of Economic Development & Culture, an Employee of the City.
  324. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Economic Support and Recovery of Economic Development & Culture, an Employee of the City.
  325. March 05, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  326. April 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  327. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  328. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  329. February 27, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  330. April 15, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  331. May 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  332. May 14, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  333. June 10, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  334. June 13, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  335. July 09, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  336. August 14, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  337. October 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  338. November 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  339. December 02, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  340. December 03, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  341. January 07, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  342. February 04, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  343. February 05, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  344. February 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  345. June 10, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Transportation Infrastructure Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  346. June 13, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Transportation Infrastructure Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  347. July 09, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Transportation Infrastructure Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  348. August 14, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Transportation Infrastructure Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  349. October 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Transportation Infrastructure Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  350. November 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Transportation Infrastructure Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  351. December 02, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Transportation Infrastructure Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  352. January 07, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Transportation Infrastructure Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  353. February 04, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Transportation Infrastructure Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  354. March 05, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Transportation Infrastructure Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  355. April 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Transportation Infrastructure Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  356. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Director, Transportation Infrastructure Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  357. May 14, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to General Manager of Fleet Services, an Employee of the City.
  358. May 14, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to General Manager of Parks, Forestry & Recreation, an Employee of the City.
  359. October 29, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  360. December 03, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  361. February 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  362. January 03, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Cycling Infrastructure & Programs of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  363. January 28, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Cycling Infrastructure & Programs of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  364. February 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Cycling Infrastructure & Programs of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  365. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Cycling Infrastructure & Programs of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  366. February 27, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Cycling Infrastructure & Programs of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  367. April 15, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Cycling Infrastructure & Programs of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  368. January 03, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  369. January 28, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  370. February 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  371. May 01, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with and sent an email to the Manager, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  372. May 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  373. June 10, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  374. June 13, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  375. July 09, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  376. August 14, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  377. October 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  378. February 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  379. February 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  380. February 26, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  381. February 27, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  382. March 13, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  383. April 15, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  384. May 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  385. May 14, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  386. June 10, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  387. June 13, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  388. June 21, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  389. June 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  390. July 09, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  391. August 14, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  392. September 18, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  393. September 30, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  394. October 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  395. March 05, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  396. April 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  397. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  398. April 24, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  399. October 22, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  400. October 23, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with and sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  401. October 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  402. October 28, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  403. October 29, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  404. November 01, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  405. November 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  406. December 02, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  407. December 03, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  408. December 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  409. December 16, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  410. December 24, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  411. January 07, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  412. January 10, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with and sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  413. January 17, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  414. February 04, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  415. February 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  416. February 20, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  417. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Transportation Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  418. October 22, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Program Designer (Toronto Urban Fellow) of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  419. January 10, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Program Designer (Toronto Urban Fellow) of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  420. March 05, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead Environment, Policy & Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  421. April 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead Environment, Policy & Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  422. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead Environment, Policy & Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  423. May 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead Environment, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  424. June 10, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead Environment, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  425. June 13, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead Environment, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  426. July 09, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead Environment, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  427. August 14, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead Environment, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  428. October 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead Environment, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  429. November 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead Environment, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  430. December 02, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead Environment, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  431. January 07, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead Environment, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  432. February 04, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead Environment, Policy and Research of Environment & Energy, an Employee of the City.
  433. January 03, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Beautiful Streets of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  434. January 28, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Beautiful Streets of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  435. February 12, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Beautiful Streets of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  436. May 01, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with and sent an email to the Project Lead, Beautiful Streets of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  437. June 11, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Public Realm Section of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  438. June 13, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Public Realm Section of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  439. June 21, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Project Lead, Public Realm Section of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  440. June 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Public Realm Section of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  441. July 09, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Public Realm Section of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  442. August 14, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Public Realm Section of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  443. October 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Public Realm Section of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  444. August 18, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  445. August 20, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  446. August 21, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  447. September 18, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  448. September 30, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  449. September 18, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  450. September 30, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  451. October 02, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  452. October 08, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  453. October 22, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  454. October 23, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  455. October 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  456. October 28, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  457. October 29, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  458. November 01, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  459. November 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  460. December 02, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  461. January 07, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  462. February 04, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  463. March 05, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  464. April 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  465. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  466. October 18, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  467. October 22, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  468. October 23, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with and sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  469. October 25, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  470. October 28, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  471. October 29, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  472. November 01, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  473. November 05, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  474. November 26, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  475. November 27, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  476. December 02, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  477. December 03, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  478. December 04, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  479. December 16, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  480. December 24, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  481. January 06, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call and sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  482. January 07, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  483. January 10, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with and sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  484. January 17, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  485. February 04, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  486. February 05, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call and sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  487. February 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  488. February 20, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  489. February 26, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  490. March 02, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  491. March 05, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  492. March 19, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call and sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  493. March 24, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  494. April 01, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  495. April 15, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  496. April 21, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  497. April 23, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  498. April 24, 2020, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  499. September 18, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Toronto Urban Fellow Research Associate of People & Equity, an Employee of the City.
  500. October 22, 2019, Chris Schafer of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Toronto Urban Fellow Research Associate of People & Equity, an Employee of the City.
  501. April 29, 2020, Katie Stevens of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  502. April 29, 2020, Katie Stevens of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, Public Realm Section, an Employee of the City.
  503. March 13, 2019, Thomas Alif of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Jim Karygiannis of Ward 22 Scarborough-Agincourt, a Member of Council.
  504. March 13, 2019, Thomas Alif of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  505. February 06, 2020, Thomas Alif of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ryan Pyne of Councillor Jennifer McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  506. March 13, 2019, Thomas Alif of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Stephanie Nakitas of Office of Councillor Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  507. March 13, 2019, Thomas Alif of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Coordinator Bicycle Safety Education of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  508. March 13, 2019, Thomas Alif of Neutron Holdings Inc., met with Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  509. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paul Ainslie of Ward 24 Scarborough-Guildwood, a Member of Council.
  510. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paul Ainslie of Ward 24 Scarborough-Guildwood, a Member of Council.
  511. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ana Bailão of Ward 9 Davenport, a Member of Council.
  512. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ana Bailão of Ward 9 Davenport, a Member of Council.
  513. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Brad Bradford of Ward 19 Beaches-East York, a Member of Council.
  514. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Brad Bradford of Ward 19 Beaches-East York, a Member of Council.
  515. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Shelley Carroll of Ward 17 Don Valley North, a Member of Council.
  516. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Shelley Carroll of Ward 17 Don Valley North, a Member of Council.
  517. July 02, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  518. July 10, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  519. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  520. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  521. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Gary Crawford of Ward 20 Scarborough Southwest, a Member of Council.
  522. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Gary Crawford of Ward 20 Scarborough Southwest, a Member of Council.
  523. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Joe Cressy of Ward 10 Spadina-Fort York, a Member of Council.
  524. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Joe Cressy of Ward 10 Spadina-Fort York, a Member of Council.
  525. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Filion of Ward 18 Willowdale, a Member of Council.
  526. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Filion of Ward 18 Willowdale, a Member of Council.
  527. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paula Fletcher of Ward 14 Toronto-Danforth, a Member of Council.
  528. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paula Fletcher of Ward 14 Toronto-Danforth, a Member of Council.
  529. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Michael Ford of Ward 1 Etobicoke North, a Member of Council.
  530. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mark Grimes of Ward 3 Etobicoke-Lakeshore, a Member of Council.
  531. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mark Grimes of Ward 3 Etobicoke-Lakeshore, a Member of Council.
  532. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephen Holyday of Ward 2 Etobicoke Centre, a Member of Council.
  533. July 23, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call to Stephen Holyday of Ward 2 Etobicoke Centre, a Member of Council.
  534. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephen Holyday of Ward 2 Etobicoke Centre, a Member of Council.
  535. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jim Karygiannis of Ward 22 Scarborough-Agincourt, a Member of Council.
  536. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Cynthia Lai of Ward 23 Scarborough North, a Member of Council.
  537. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Cynthia Lai of Ward 23 Scarborough North, a Member of Council.
  538. July 02, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  539. July 09, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  540. July 10, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  541. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  542. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  543. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Josh Matlow of Ward 12 Toronto-St. Paul’s, a Member of Council.
  544. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Josh Matlow of Ward 12 Toronto-St. Paul’s, a Member of Council.
  545. July 02, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  546. July 10, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  547. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  548. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  549. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  550. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  551. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Frances Nunziata of Ward 5 York South-Weston, a Member of Council.
  552. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Frances Nunziata of Ward 5 York South-Weston, a Member of Council.
  553. July 02, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  554. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  555. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  556. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Gord Perks of Ward 4 Parkdale-High Park, a Member of Council.
  557. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Gord Perks of Ward 4 Parkdale-High Park, a Member of Council.
  558. July 02, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  559. July 03, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  560. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  561. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  562. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jaye Robinson of Ward 15 Don Valley West, a Member of Council.
  563. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jaye Robinson of Ward 15 Don Valley West, a Member of Council.
  564. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Michael Thompson of Ward 21 Scarborough Centre, a Member of Council.
  565. July 10, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Tory of Mayor, a Member of Council.
  566. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Tory of Mayor, a Member of Council.
  567. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Tory of Mayor, a Member of Council.
  568. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Kristyn Wong-Tam of Ward 13 Toronto Centre, a Member of Council.
  569. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Kristyn Wong-Tam of Ward 13 Toronto Centre, a Member of Council.
  570. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Abdullah Sherif of Councillor Cynthia Lai, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  571. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Amalia Stefanopoulos of Councillor Denzil Minnan-Wong, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  572. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Anthony Ferrari of Councillor Frances Nunziata, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  573. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Antonette DiNovo of Councillor Paul Ainslie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  574. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ashley Mcdonald of Councillor Jaye Robinson, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  575. July 02, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Aytakin Mohammadi of Councillor James Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  576. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Aytakin Mohammadi of Councillor James Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  577. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Carolina Vecchiarelli of Councillor Josh Matlow, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  578. July 02, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Caroline Duffy of Councillor Mike Colle, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  579. July 10, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Caroline Duffy of Councillor Mike Colle, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  580. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Caroline Duffy of Councillor Mike Colle, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  581. July 10, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  582. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  583. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Edward Birnbaum of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  584. July 02, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Hector Alonso of Councillor James Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  585. July 02, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jessica Pointon of Councillor Anthony Perruzza, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  586. July 03, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Jessica Pointon of Councillor Anthony Perruzza, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  587. July 02, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to John Sinclair of Councillor Jennifer McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  588. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Karen Duffy of Councillor Gord Perks, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  589. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Kim Edgar of Councillor Mark Grimes, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  590. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Lesley Burlie of Councillor Jaye Robinson, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  591. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Lia Brewer of Councillor Joe Cressy, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  592. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Lorraine Hewitt of Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  593. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Maham Aqil of Councillor Gary Crawford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  594. July 02, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Matias de Dovitiis of Councillor Anthony Perruzza, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  595. July 07, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., had a teleconference with Matias de Dovitiis of Councillor Anthony Perruzza, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  596. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Matias de Dovitiis of Councillor Anthony Perruzza, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  597. October 07, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to and had a teleconference with Michael Giles of Councillor Ana Bailão, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  598. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Nikolaos Mantas of Ward 22 Scarborough-Agincourt, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  599. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paul Bieksa of Councillor Brad Bradford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  600. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Paula Goncalves of Councillor Cynthia Lai, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  601. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Robyn Bidgood of Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  602. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Ryan Lo of Councillor Shelley Carroll, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  603. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Sarah Barber of Councillor John Filion, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  604. July 08, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., made a telephone call to Scott Morphet of Councillor Jennifer McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  605. July 10, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Scott Morphet of Councillor Jennifer McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  606. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Scott Morphet of Councillor Jennifer McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  607. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Sheila Henderson of Councillor Stephen Holyday, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  608. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Slavisa Mijatovic of Councillor Josh Matlow, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  609. July 02, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Councillor Mike Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  610. July 09, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Councillor Mike Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  611. July 10, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Councillor Mike Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  612. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Councillor Mike Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  613. July 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to Susan Serran of Ouncillor Paula Fletcher’s Office, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  614. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  615. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  616. October 15, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  617. July 30, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., had a teleconference with Manager, Strategic Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  618. August 21, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Strategic Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  619. September 10, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Strategic Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  620. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Strategic Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  621. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Strategic Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  622. September 30, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Strategic Policy and Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  623. July 30, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., had a teleconference with Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  624. August 21, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  625. September 10, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  626. September 12, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  627. September 14, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  628. September 30, 2020, Jonathan Hopkins of Neutron Holdings Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.

 Roundtrip Systems

  1. March 12, 2020, Boris Chan, Senior Officer of Roundtrip Systems, met with Director of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  2. May 20, 2020, Boris Chan, Senior Officer of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to the Project Manager, Strategic Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  3. June 02, 2020, Boris Chan, Senior Officer of Roundtrip Systems, had a video chat with Project Manager, Strategic Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  4. June 08, 2020, Boris Chan, Senior Officer of Roundtrip Systems, made a telephone call to the Senior Policy Advisor, Strategic Alliances of Economic Development, an Employee of the City.
  5. January 20, 2020, Boris Chan, Senior Officer of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  6. March 11, 2020, Boris Chan, Senior Officer of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  7. July 22, 2020, Boris Chan, Senior Officer of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  8. May 25, 2020, Boris Chan, Senior Officer of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Support Asst B, Strategic Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  9. March 12, 2020, Sevaan Franks of Roundtrip Systems, met with Director of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  10. December 06, 2019, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  11. January 14, 2020, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  12. December 05, 2019, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Paula Fletcher of Ward 14 Toronto-Danforth, a Member of Council.
  13. January 14, 2020, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Paula Fletcher of Ward 14 Toronto-Danforth, a Member of Council.
  14. December 06, 2019, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  15. January 14, 2020, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  16. December 06, 2019, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  17. January 14, 2020, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  18. December 06, 2019, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  19. January 14, 2020, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  20. December 06, 2019, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  21. January 14, 2020, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  22. December 06, 2019, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  23. January 14, 2020, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  24. January 13, 2020, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, met with and sent an e-mail to Director of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  25. February 19, 2020, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Director of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  26. March 12, 2020, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, met with Director of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  27. December 06, 2019, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Executive Director of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  28. December 09, 2019, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Executive Director of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  29. January 10, 2020, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Executive Director of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  30. January 13, 2020, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to Executive Director of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  31. December 10, 2019, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to the Project Lead of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  32. December 19, 2019, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, met with Project Lead of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  33. January 13, 2020, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, met with and sent an e-mail to the Senior Policy & Research Officer of Municipal Licensing & Standards, an Employee of the City.
  34. December 06, 2019, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to the Senior Transportation Solutions Integrator of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  35. December 10, 2019, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, sent an e-mail to the Senior Transportation Solutions Integrator of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  36. December 19, 2019, Andrew Scherkus of Roundtrip Systems, met with Senior Transportation Solutions Integrator of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.

 Roll Technologies

  1. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  2. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  3. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  4. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  5. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  6. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  7. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to Mayor John Tory, a Member of Council.
  8. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to Amalia Stefanopoulos of Councillor Denzil Minnan-Wong’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  9. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to Aytakin Mohammadi of Councillor James Pasternak’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  10. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to Caroline Duffy of Councillor Mike Colle’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  11. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to Daniela Magisano from the Office of the Mayor John Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  12. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to Edward Birnbaum from the Office of the Mayor John Tory, a Staff of Member of Council.
  13. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to Matias de Dovitiis of Councillor Anthony Perruzza’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  14. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to Scott Morphet of Councillor Jennifer McKelvie’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  15. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to Stephanie Nakitsas of Councillor Mike Layton’s Office, a Staff of Member of Council.
  16. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  17. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to the Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  18. September 14, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  19. September 18, 2020, Arda Erturk, Senior Officer of Roll Technologies, sent an e-mail to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.

 Crestview Strategy

  1. September 29, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, sent an email to Ana Bailão of Ward 9 Davenport, a Member of Council.
  2. September 29, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, sent an email to Brad Bradford of Ward 19 Beaches-East York, a Member of Council.
  3. September 29, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, sent an email to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  4. September 29, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, sent an email to Joe Cressy of Ward 10 Spadina-Fort York, a Member of Council.
  5. September 29, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, sent an email to Paula Fletcher of Ward 14 Toronto-Danforth, a Member of Council.
  6. September 29, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, sent an email to Stephen Holyday of Ward 2 Etobicoke Centre, a Member of Council.
  7. September 29, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, sent an email to Cynthia Lai of Ward 23 Scarborough North, a Member of Council.
  8. September 29, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  9. September 29, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, sent an email to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  10. September 29, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  11. September 29, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, sent an email to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  12. September 29, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, sent an email to Michael Thompson of Ward 21 Scarborough Centre, a Member of Council.
  13. September 29, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, sent an email to John Tory of the Mayor’s Office, a Member of Council.
  14. October 16, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, met with Daryl Finlayson of Ouncillor Paula Fletcher’s Office, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  15. October 16, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, met with Nicolas Valverde of Ouncillor Paula Fletcher’s Office, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  16. October 15, 2020, Jaskaran Sandhu, Senior Consultant of Crestview Strategy, met with General Manager of Economic Development and Culture, an Employee of the City.

 Mobility Consulting

  1. July 06, 2020, David Cooper, Principal of Leading Mobility Consulting, sent an email to Daniela Magisano of The Mayor’s Office, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  2. July 07, 2020, David Cooper, Principal of Leading Mobility Consulting, met with Matias de Dovitiis of Councillor Perruzza, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  3. July 06, 2020, David Cooper, Principal of Leading Mobility Consulting, sent an email to Scott Morphet of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  4. July 08, 2020, David Cooper, Principal of Leading Mobility Consulting, met with Scott Morphet of Councillor McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  5. July 30, 2020, David Cooper, Principal of Leading Mobility Consulting, met with Manager Trans Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  6. July 30, 2020, David Cooper, Principal of Leading Mobility Consulting, met with Senior Project Manager, Strategic Policy&Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.

 Lyft Canada Inc.

  1. September 23, 2020, Hannah Parish of Lyft Canada Inc., sent an email to Deputy CEO of TTC, an Employee of a Local Board.
  2. September 23, 2020, Hannah Parish of Lyft Canada Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  3. September 23, 2020, Hannah Parish of Lyft Canada Inc., sent an email to Director, Project, Design & Management of Transportation, an Employee of the City.
  4. September 23, 2020, Hannah Parish of Lyft Canada Inc., sent an email to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  5. September 18, 2020, Hannah Parish of Lyft Canada Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  6. September 23, 2020,
  7. Tom Divito of Lyft Canada Inc., sent an email to Deputy CEO of TTC, an Employee of a Local Board.
  8. September 23, 2020,
  9. Tom Divito of Lyft Canada Inc., sent an email to Director, Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  10. September 23, 2020,
  11. Tom Divito of Lyft Canada Inc., sent an email to Director, Project Design & Management of Transportation, an Employee of the City.
  12. September 23, 2020,
  13. Tom Divito of Lyft Canada Inc., sent an email to General Manager of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.

Populus Technologies, Inc.

  1. October 01, 2019, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  2. October 09, 2019, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., made a telephone call and/or had a web-based call with Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  3. October 18, 2019, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  4. March 05, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  5. June 17, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  6. June 22, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  7. June 23, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., met and/or had an online meeting with Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  8. January 23, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  9. June 01, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  10. June 16, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  11. June 18, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  12. June 23, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., met and/or had an online meeting with Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  13. July 02, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  14. July 16, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  15. June 05, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., met and/or had an online meeting with Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  16. June 10, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  17. March 05, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  18. September 27, 2019, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  19. October 01, 2019, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  20. October 09, 2019, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., made a telephone call and/or had a web-based call with Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  21. October 18, 2019, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  22. January 23, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  23. February 14, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  24. February 28, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  25. March 05, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  26. March 09, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  27. March 24, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  28. April 15, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  29. April 16, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  30. May 08, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  31. May 19, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  32. May 27, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., met and/or had an online meeting with Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  33. June 10, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  34. June 16, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  35. June 17, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  36. June 22, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  37. October 01, 2019, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  38. October 09, 2019, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., made a telephone call and/or had a web-based call with Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  39. October 18, 2019, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  40. February 14, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  41. February 28, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  42. March 05, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  43. June 17, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  44. June 22, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  45. September 18, 2020, Regina Clewlow, Senior Officer of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  46. September 13, 2019, Malia Schiling of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  47. September 25, 2019, Malia Schiling of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  48. October 01, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  49. October 09, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., made a telephone call and/or had a web-based call with Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  50. October 18, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  51. December 09, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  52. January 22, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  53. January 23, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  54. March 05, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  55. June 23, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., met and/or had an online meeting with Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  56. September 10, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  57. September 15, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  58. September 16, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  59. October 13, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  60. January 23, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  61. June 01, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  62. June 16, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  63. June 18, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  64. June 23, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., met and/or had an online meeting with Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  65. July 02, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  66. July 16, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  67. September 10, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  68. September 15, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  69. September 16, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  70. October 13, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  71. June 05, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., met and/or had an online meeting with Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  72. June 10, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  73. September 10, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  74. March 05, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  75. September 27, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  76. October 01, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  77. October 09, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., made a telephone call and/or had a web-based call with Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  78. October 18, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  79. December 09, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  80. January 22, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  81. January 23, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  82. February 14, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  83. February 26, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  84. February 28, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  85. March 05, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  86. March 09, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  87. March 24, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  88. April 15, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  89. April 16, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  90. May 08, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  91. May 19, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  92. May 27, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., met and/or had an online meeting with Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  93. June 10, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  94. June 16, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  95. September 10, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  96. September 15, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  97. September 16, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  98. October 13, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  99. September 05, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  100. September 09, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  101. September 10, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  102. September 13, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  103. September 25, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  104. October 01, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  105. October 18, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  106. December 09, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  107. December 23, 2019, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  108. January 22, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  109. January 23, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  110. February 14, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  111. February 28, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  112. March 05, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  113. July 22, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  114. September 18, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  115. February 05, 2020, Stephanie Seki of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  116. October 09, 2019, Eliot Mueting of Populus Technologies, Inc., made a telephone call and/or had a web-based call with Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  117. October 09, 2019, Eliot Mueting of Populus Technologies, Inc., made a telephone call and/or had a web-based call with Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  118. October 09, 2019, Eliot Mueting of Populus Technologies, Inc., made a telephone call and/or had a web-based call with Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  119. March 05, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  120. June 23, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., met and/or had an online meeting with Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  121. September 10, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  122. September 15, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  123. September 16, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  124. October 13, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Data & Analytics of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  125. January 23, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  126. June 01, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  127. June 16, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  128. June 18, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  129. June 23, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., met and/or had an online meeting with Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  130. July 02, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  131. July 16, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  132. September 10, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  133. September 15, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  134. September 16, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  135. October 13, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  136. June 05, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., met and/or had an online meeting with Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  137. June 10, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Operational Policy & Innovation of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  138. March 05, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Street Furniture Management of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  139. January 23, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  140. February 14, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  141. February 26, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  142. February 28, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  143. March 05, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  144. March 09, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  145. March 24, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  146. April 16, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  147. May 08, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  148. May 19, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  149. May 27, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., met and/or had an online meeting with Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  150. June 10, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  151. June 16, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  152. September 10, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  153. September 15, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  154. September 16, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  155. October 13, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Lead, Big Data Innovation Team of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  156. February 14, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  157. February 28, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.
  158. March 05, 2020, Rodney Stiles of Populus Technologies, Inc., sent an email to the Project Officer, Pedestrian Projects of Transportation Services, an Employee of the City.

 Scooty Mobility Inc.

  1. July 07, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  2. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  3. March 02, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., met with and sent an email to Michael Ford of Ward 1 Etobicoke North, a Member of Council.
  4. July 07, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  5. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  6. September 28, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  7. June 02, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Josh Matlow of Ward 12 Toronto-St. Paul’s, a Member of Council.
  8. July 07, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  9. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  10. July 07, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  11. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  12. July 07, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  13. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  14. July 07, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  15. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  16. July 07, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to John Tory of Mayor, a Member of Council.
  17. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to John Tory of Mayor, a Member of Council.
  18. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Amelia Stefanopoulos of Denzil Minnan-Wong, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  19. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Aytakin Mohammadi of James Pasternak, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  20. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Caroline Duffy of Mike Colle, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  21. May 26, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Mayor, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  22. July 07, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Mayor, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  23. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Daniela Magisano of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  24. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Edward Birnbaum of Mayor Tory, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  25. July 23, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., made a telephone call and sent an email to Jonathan Kent of Michael Ford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  26. February 12, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., made a telephone call and sent an email to Luke Robertson of Mayor, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  27. July 07, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Luke Robertson of Mayor, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  28. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Mathias de Dovitiis of Anthony Peruzza, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  29. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Scott Morphet of Jennifer McKelvie, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  30. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Stephanie Nakitsas of Mike Layton, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  31. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to General Manager of Transportation, an Employee of the City.
  32. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to the Manager of Transportation, an Employee of the City.
  33. September 14, 2020, Shoaib Ahmed, Senior Officer of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to the Senior Project Manager of Transportation, an Employee of the City.
  34. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Paul Ainslie of Ward 24 Scarborough-Guildwood, a Member of Council.
  35. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Ana Bailão of Ward 9 Davenport, a Member of Council.
  36. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Brad Bradford of Ward 19 Beaches-East York, a Member of Council.
  37. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Shelley Carroll of Ward 17 Don Valley North, a Member of Council.
  38. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Mike Colle of Ward 8 Eglinton-Lawrence, a Member of Council.
  39. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Gary Crawford of Ward 20 Scarborough Southwest, a Member of Council.
  40. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Joe Cressy of Ward 10 Spadina-Fort York, a Member of Council.
  41. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to John Filion of Ward 18 Willowdale, a Member of Council.
  42. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Paula Fletcher of Ward 14 Toronto-Danforth, a Member of Council.
  43. March 02, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., met with Michael Ford of Ward 1 Etobicoke North, a Member of Council.
  44. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Michael Ford of Ward 1 Etobicoke North, a Member of Council.
  45. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Mark Grimes of Ward 3 Etobicoke-Lakeshore, a Member of Council.
  46. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Stephen Holyday of Ward 2 Etobicoke Centre, a Member of Council.
  47. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Cynthia Lai of Ward 23 Scarborough North, a Member of Council.
  48. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Mike Layton of Ward 11 University-Rosedale, a Member of Council.
  49. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Josh Matlow of Ward 12 Toronto-St. Paul’s, a Member of Council.
  50. July 31, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Josh Matlow of Ward 12 Toronto-St. Paul’s, a Member of Council.
  51. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Jennifer McKelvie of Ward 25 Scarborough-Rouge Park, a Member of Council.
  52. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Denzil Minnan-Wong of Ward 16 Don Valley East, a Member of Council.
  53. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Frances Nunziata of Ward 5 York South-Weston, a Member of Council.
  54. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to James Pasternak of Ward 6 York Centre, a Member of Council.
  55. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Gord Perks of Ward 4 Parkdale-High Park, a Member of Council.
  56. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Anthony Perruzza of Ward 7 Humber River-Black Creek, a Member of Council.
  57. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Jaye Robinson of Ward 15 Don Valley West, a Member of Council.
  58. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Michael Thompson of Ward 21 Scarborough Centre, a Member of Council.
  59. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to John Tory of Mayor, a Member of Council.
  60. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Kristyn Wong-Tam of Ward 13 Toronto Centre, a Member of Council.
  61. July 23, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., made a telephone call to Jonathan Kent of Michael Ford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  62. July 31, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Jonathan Kent of Michael Ford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  63. August 01, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Jonathan Kent of Michael Ford, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  64. February 12, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., made a telephone call to Luke Robertson of Mayor, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  65. July 28, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Meri Newton of Ward 4, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  66. July 28, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Mustapha Khamissa of Ward 17, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  67. July 27, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Nikolaos Mantas of Ward 22, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  68. July 28, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Paula Goncalves of Ward 23, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  69. July 28, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Sheila Henderson of Ward 2, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  70. July 31, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to Slaviša Mijatovic of Ward 12, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  71. December 11, 2019, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Development of CreateTO, an Employee of a Local Board.
  72. July 29, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to the Manager, Strategic Policy and Innovation of Transportation, an Employee of the City.
  73. July 29, 2020, Moaz Ahmad Shoaib of Scooty Mobility Inc., sent an email to the Project Manager, Automated Vehicles of Transportation, an Employee of the City.
  74. March 02, 2020, Shahid Pasha of Scooty Mobility Inc., met with Michael Ford of Ward 1 Etobicoke North, a Member of Council.
  75. February 12, 2020, Shahid Pasha of Scooty Mobility Inc., made a telephone call to Luke Robertson of Mayor, a Staff of a Member of Council.
  76. July 23, 2020, Edmund Sofo of Scooty Mobility Inc., made a telephone call to Jonathan Kent of Michael Ford, a Staff of a Member of Council.

Radical Wheelz Inc.

  1. June 07, 2020, Ken Gregory, Senior Officer of Radical Wheelz Inc., sent an email to the Senior public manager public realm of Transportation services, an Employee of the City.



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An Important New Report to the Ontario Government Calls on the Government and School Boards to Take Action Now to Ensure that One Third of a Million Students with Disabilities are Able to Fully Participate in Ontario Schools as They Re-Open This Fall


Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update

United for a Barrier-Free Society for All People with Disabilities

Web: www.aodaalliance.org Email: [email protected] Twitter: @aodaalliance Facebook: www.facebook.com/aodaalliance/

An Important New Report to the Ontario Government Calls on the Government and School Boards to Take Action Now to Ensure that One Third of a Million Students with Disabilities are Able to Fully Participate in Ontario Schools as They Re-Open This Fall

August 14, 2020

          SUMMARY

We today share with you a very important new report that bears on the needs of a third of a million students with disabilities in Ontario-funded schools, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues. Three weeks ago, the Ford Government received a detailed report on the steps it needs to take to meet the needs of students with disabilities now and into the fall, in the face of the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. This thorough report, which we set out in full below, was written by a subcommittee of the Government-appointed K-12 Education Standards Development Committee. AODA Alliance Chair David Lepofsky serves on that Standards Development Committee and was one of the members of the subcommittee that collectively developed this report. The subcommittee included representation from the disability sector and the school board community.

We are delighted that this report includes the substance of all the recommendations that the AODA Alliance put forward in its June 19, 2020 brief to the Ontario Government on how to meet the needs of students with disabilities during school re-opening. It expands and enhances on the recommendations in the AODA Alliance‘s June 19, 2020 brief to the Ontario Government. This report also goes further, adding other important recommendations.

With school re-opening fast approaching, it is important for the Ford Government to now announce a plan to implement these recommendations. Until the Ford Government does so, we call on all Ontario school boards to review this report and implement its recommendations in their plans for school re-opening.

We encourage one and all to send this report to your member of the Ontario legislature, your school board trustee, and your local media. Email Premier Doug Ford and Education Minister Stephen Lecce. Emphasize to all of them that this report needs immediate action.

The AODA Alliance has been spearheading a campaign for over a decade to tear down the barriers facing students with disabilities in Ontario’s education system. We led the multi-year campaign to get the Ontario Government to agree to create an Education Accessibility Standard under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act .

For more background on these issues, please visit the AODA Alliances COVID-19 web page and our education web page. Check out the widely-viewed online video of the May 4, 2020 virtual Town Hall on meeting the needs of students with disabilities during the COVID-19 crisis, co-organized by the Ontario Autism Coalition and the AODA Alliance.

Stay safe, and let us know what you do to help us press for these reforms. Email us at [email protected]

          MORE DETAILS

July 24, 2020 Letter to the Ontario Minister of Education and Minister for Accessibility from the Chair of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee

Date: Friday, July 24, 2020

The Honourable Stephen Lecce

Minister of Education

5th Floor, 438 University Avenue,

Toronto, Ontario M7A 2A5

The Honourable Raymond Cho
Minister for Seniors and Accessibility
5th Floor, 777 Bay Street,

Toronto, Ontario M7A 1S5

Dear Minister Lecce and Minister Cho,

Re: K-12 Education Standards Development Committee: Planning for Emergencies and Safety Small Group Report

On behalf of the members of the Planning for Emergencies and Safety small group (the small group), I am pleased to submit the small group’s advice and recommendations on emergency planning and safety for students with disabilities in K-12 education during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The K-12 Education Standards Development Committee (The Committee) formed the small group when the Ministry of Education was seeking feedback from the Committee on the barriers and issues identified through the COVID-19 pandemic. The small group’s mandate includes using experiential learning from the COVID-19 pandemic to:

  • identify new and reoccurring accessibility barriers to learning for students with disabilities in the context of remote learning; and
  • develop an emergency plan framework (that covers the phases of preparing, planning, response and recovery) for a systematic response to an emergency.

The small group members have put incredible effort, time and passion to complete this report that includes valuable advice and recommendations for government consideration. The report addresses the following 9 barriers for students with disabilities as a result of COVID-19:

  1. organizational, policy and procedural barriers
  2. mental health and well being
  3. academic (learning inequities for students with disabilities)
  4. support for secondary school students with disabilities
  5. transitions between in school and virtual learning
  6. accessible communication and technology
  7. training on the integration of digital technology into learning
  8. transportation
  9. recommendations addressing barriers for the Government and School Boards in emergency planning and safety

Thank you for your shared commitment to ensuring accessibility and inclusion for students with disabilities in Ontario. We have appreciated the discussions with Minister Lecce on Grants for Students Needs funding and the school board memos that address the current work being done to support students. The barriers in our report reflect what we have heard from various educational partners, families of student with disabilities and students within Ontario. I would be happy to meet with you to discuss these additional recommendations. The work and passion of the Committee continues, and we look forward to more opportunities to share our advice and feedback with you.

Together we can create an accessible and inclusive education system for students with disabilities during this unprecedented time.

Sincerely,

(Original signed by)

 

 

Lynn Ziraldo,
Chair, K-12 Education Standards Development Committee

Attachments:

  1. Small group report

July 24, 2020 Report to the Ontario Government from the Planning for Emergencies and Safety Subcommittee of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee

July 24, 2020

Introduction

The COVID-19 Pandemic has tested emergency plans for all levels of government, businesses, agencies, education systems, communities, families, and citizens in the province of Ontario. Many risks have been identified and challenges have arisen because of the pandemic and more continue to be identified as we move through the stages of the emergency. Emergency plans, response and procedures need to be reviewed to address these risks and barriers immediately and to improve responses to emergencies in the future.

As the Ministry of Education was seeking feedback on barriers and emerging issues identified during the COVID-19 Pandemic, the K-12 Standards Development Committee formed the Planning for Emergency and Safety Working Group with a focus on students with disabilities with the following mandate:

Using experiential learning from the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • Identify new and reoccurring accessibility barriers to learning for students with disabilities in the context of remote learning
  • Develop an emergency plan framework (that covers the phases of preparing, planning, response and recovery) for a systematic response to an emergency.

Methodology

The Planning for Emergencies & Safety Working Group gathered resources from experts including the Framework for Reopening Schools developed by UNICEF, SickKids recommendations to Reopening Schools, Letters to Minister Lecce from the Ontario Human Rights Commission of July 14, 2020; and various other resources and articles from educational partners within Ontario, other provinces and countries (See Resource Section). While reviewing the documents, the Working Group identified barriers and subsequently developed recommendations to address said barriers.

Organizational Challenges and Barriers during COVID-19

Through a review of resources, feedback from parents and guardians, agencies, health professionals and educational stakeholders’ opinions expressed, the Working Group found that students with disabilities have faced challenges compounded by COVID-19.  Their needs have been inconsistently addressed or not at all. These are some organizational, policy and procedural barriers identified:

  • Inconsistent or unclear messaging from varying levels of government, health agencies and school boards
  • Lack of or unable to access consistent data from all regions and school boards to support data driven decisions and implement actions quickly and effectively.
  • Policies and procedures outdated, non-existent, or inflexible to accommodate this type of emergency – COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Emergency response teams not reflecting the different subject knowledge needed to support decision making and development of a plan that reflects the needs of students with disabilities.
  • Inter-governmental, health service, service agencies and school board service agreements did not reflect the ability to provide services in a virtual learning environment
  • Service delivery models used by government, health services, service agencies and school boards not conducive to virtual service delivery.
  • The extent to which Board’s utilized or sought feedback from its SEACs in developing response or action plans to the COVID-19 pandemic varied from none to fully participated.
  • Not all school boards have an Accessibility Standards Committee or for those school boards that do have members of the community or people with disabilities who have lived experience that can help plan and implement the Public Health Guidelines to mitigate risks of COVID-19 in schools for students with disabilities
  • School board Accessibility Standards Committee can be helpful in helping to plan and implement the Public Health Guidelines to mitigate risks of COVID-19 in schools for students with disabilities. However, not all school boards have such committees, or committee membership that includes members of the community or people with disabilities who have lived experience that can inform planning and implementation.

Key Recommendations for Planning for Emergencies

It is important in planning for return to school, the opportunity is taken to review and create structures, policy and procedures that can adapt and be more flexible for a 2nd wave or future emergencies.

By learning from innovations and emergency processes, systems can adapt and scale up the more effective solutions. In doing so, they could become more effective, more agile, and more resilient” – (quoted from THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC: SHOCKS TO EDUCATION AND POLICY RESPONSES, World Bank).

There are 5 known steps to Emergency Planning and Preparedness: 1) Know your risk, 2) Build your Team, 3) Make critical information accessible quickly, 4) Update alert and response procedure, 5) Test the plan and revise.

To eliminate barriers identified, that a return to school plan has input from end users, be designed through an inclusive process and not by one team or group. A team of subject expertise from across the organization is critical for developing a strong plan.

Recommendations – Government

For the above reasons, it is recommended that

  • The Ministry of Education should establish a Central Education Leadership Command Table with responsibilities for ensuring that students with disabilities have access to all accommodations and supports they require during the present COVID-19 pandemic. The responsibilities of the Command Table shall include:
    1. immediately develop a comprehensive plan to meet the urgent learning needs of students with disabilities during COVID-19 pandemic quickly and resolve issues for students with disabilities as they arise. The comprehensive plan should be shared for implementation by school boards. This plan should include and incorporate the three options for education:
  • normal school day routine with enhanced public health protocols
  • modified school day routine based on smaller class sizes, cohorting and alternative day or week delivery, and,
  • at-home learning with ongoing enhanced remote delivery
    1. collect and share data on existing and emerging issues as a result of COVID-19, the effective responses of other jurisdictions in supporting students with disabilities during the current emergency, using evidence base data collection method for people with disabilities
    2. establish a fully accessible centralized hub, and share and publicize the hub, for sharing of effective practices about supporting students with disabilities
    3. develop a rapid response team to receive feedback from school boards on recurring issues facing students with disabilities and to help find solutions to share with school boards
    4. provide clear communication and guidance on school opening, health service delivery, etc. based on data collected.
  • The government/Ministry of Education shall establish a cross sectorial Partnership Table at provincial and regional levels with the responsibility to integrate, coordinate and foster cross sector planning and response to emergencies. Responsibilities of this table are to:
    1. enhance an interlinked, coordinated and inter-ministerial approach in providing a seamless service delivery model to provide services and supports to students with disabilities (Psychology, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Mental Health, etc.).
    2. collect data now, from respective sectors, health services, education, service agencies, etc. to identify existing and emerging barriers, know exactly which students with disabilities and how they are impacted, their needs, and how to better direct resources to support them
    3. provide clear communication and guidance on school opening, health service delivery, etc. based on data collected to ensure accessibility for students with disabilities.
  • The Ministry of Education provincial and regional partnership tables should include advisors that can provide insight on the needs and challenges of students with disabilities from lived experience and the collective experience of disability support groups, as well as students with disabilities.
  • The Ministry of Education should assign staff to assist the Central Educational Command Table by serving as a central rapid response team to receive feedback from school boards on recurring issues facing students with disabilities and to help find solutions to share with school boards.
  • The Ministry of Education should direct that each school board shall establish a similar Board Command table. (See recommendation 12 for School Boards).
  • The provincial government continue and enhance an interlinked, coordinated and inter-ministerial approach in providing a seamless service delivery model to provide services and supports to students with disabilities (Psychology, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Mental Health, etc.).
  • The Ministry of Education should collect and aggregate International data, resources and information from other countries experiences for use in planning transitions between in-school and distance education, including continuation of virtual learning at home.
  • The Ministry of Education should developed comprehensive plans for students with disabilities that addresses the surge in demand and increase capacity to provide specialized disability supports, including enhanced staffing, for the return to in-class and distance learning (increase in in-class supports, social workers, psychologists, guidance counsellors)
  • The Ministry of Education should develop guidelines that provide for alternate or enhanced childcare opportunities to be made available to families of students with a disability, for students required to stay home due to adapted model classroom scheduling. (Excludes childcare needs that are related to quarantine self-isolation for child or family due to exposure or a local outbreak of the virus.)
  • To get the most from the volunteer work of SEACs around Ontario, the Ministry of Education should:
  1. a) Create and maintain a listserv or other virtual network of all Ontario SEACs, to enable them to share their efforts with all other SEACs around Ontario, and
  2. b) Frequently gather input from SEACs around Ontario about the experiences of students with disabilities during the COVID-19 crisis to inform future policies and regulations and directions for school boards.
  • To promote transparency, accountability and identify trends, the Ministry of Education should immediately issue a policy direction for boards to create an exclusion policy, that imposes restrictions on when and how a principal may exclude a student from school, including directions that:
  1. a) Does not impede, create barrier, or disproportionally increase burdens for students with disabilities the right to attend school for the entire day as do students without disabilities. The power to refuse to admit a student to school for all or part of the school day should not be used in a way that disproportionately burdens students with disabilities or that creates a barrier to their right to attend school.
  2. b) Tracks exclusions and provide a transparent procedure and practice to parents/guardians, by requiring a principal who refuses to admit a student to school during the school re-opening process to immediately give the student and their parent/guardian written notice of their decision to do so, including written reasons for the refusal to admit, the duration of the refusal to admit and notice of the parent/guardian’s right to appeal this refusal to admit to the school board.
  3. c) Tracks exclusions, increases accountability and informs policies by requiring a principal who refuses to admit a student to school for all or part of the school day to immediately report this in writing to their school board’s senior management, including the reasons for the exclusion, its duration and whether the student has a disability. Each school board should be required to compile this information and to report it on a regular basis to the board of trustees, the public and the Ministry of Education (with individual information totally anonymized).
  • The Ministry of Education should provide clear guidelines and expectations to school boards on the implementation of Public Health Guidelines to mitigate risks of COVID-19 to ensure that school buildings and grounds be fully accessible for students with disabilities.

Recommendations – School Boards

  • School Boards should establish a similar Board Command/Central table as the Ministry of Education’s Central Education Command/Central Table, to receive and act on feedback from teachers, principals and families about problems they are encountering serving students with disabilities during the COVID-19 period. The Table will quickly network with similar offices/Tables at other school boards and can report recurring issues to the Ministry’s command table.
  • School Boards should utilize the expertise of the Special Education Advisory Committee members by directly involving members in the planning for the delivery of remote learning, other emergency plans, through regular meetings and frequent communications.
  • School Boards should enhance its hub of resources with successful practices, lesson plans, resources specific to students with disabilities in a virtual learning environment for ease of access and support teachers and students in their learning.
  • School Boards should involve their Accessibility Committee, or if there is no committee to establish an Accessibility Advisory Committee which will review all plans at the school board and school level for mitigating risk of COVID-19 meet the accessibility requirements of all students or people with disabilities.
  • School Boards should assign a leadership staff member responsible for ensuring that all changes at schools in response to COVID-19 maintain accessibility for all students with disabilities.

Mental Health & Well Being

As found through the review of resources, student and family mental health & wellbeing needs have soared to due to the traumatic effects of COVID-19. Students wellbeing has suffered for a variety of barriers: effects of isolation from social distancing, increased rise in domestic violence, lack of access to school breakfast programs, lack of access to mental health & therapeutic services, and negative financial impact to family’s income to name a few.

Barriers

  • Agencies, different levels of government and school boards developing plans and working on solutions to barriers with little or no coordination
  • Support for parents with students with complex needs are insufficient
  • Health services and supports not consistently or sufficiently prepared to provide health and mental health services in a virtual setting
  • There is a flood of information and resources being presented to teachers, parents and students
  • More inter-ministerial leadership and collaboration between Ministries of Education (MOE), Community, Children & Social Services (MCCSS) and Health (MOH) is required
  • School Boards and staff must be equipped with appropriate PPE for their own health and wellbeing
  • Need to safely deliver additional supports such and as breakfast & nutrition programs provided by community agencies
  • Plans for the next phase include a return to in-class and virtual instruction, including adapted models whereby some students will be scheduled at home on an alternate day or alternate week basis. Having students at home for short or long periods (alternate day to full semester) will be a significant challenge for families and may prevent the return to work for many parents. Some parents of children with disabilities face barriers to employment, and many others are overburdened with providing 24-hour care to students with complex care needs.

Recommendations – Government

  • The government should enhance the central hub of mental health & wellbeing information resources at provincial and regional levels with key messages and links to other resources. Ensure all resources are in an accessible digital format (as per Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation), well publicised and shared with school boards.
  • Ministries should review and increase capacity of Ontario Telehealth Network (OTN) and other privacy protected health platforms to allow for boards to use (even in non-emergency times) and deliver services by regulated health care professionals that protect the privacy of the health services and IPRCs.
  • Ministries of Education, Health and Children, Community & Social Services should remove any cross-jurisdictional barriers related to the provision of health and education services to ensure students with disabilities can be provided with the mental health & wellbeing services they require to be delivered remotely. (For example, under Policy/Program Memorandum (PPM) 149, Protocol for Partnerships with External Agencies for Provision of Services by Regulated Health Professionals, Regulated Social Service Professionals, and Paraprofessionals permit electric consent for services and virtual access to services for students with disabilities).
  • The Ministry of Education should provide funding and clear guidelines on use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and protocols for detection and containment of COVID-19 for boards, staff and all students, including those with disabilities. Public health authorities should establish clear protocols for the detection and containment of COVID-19 (and other infectious diseases) for school boards. The guidelines and protocols should be flexible for school boards to react to local situations to mitigate risks.
  • The Ministry of Education’s plan for school re-openings must include detailed directions on required measures to mitigate risk for students with disabilities from COVID-19 to maintain their health and wellbeing during any return to school. This requires additional planning in advance by school boards and additional funding to school boards to hire and train the additional Special Needs Assistants (SNA) and Educational Assistants (EA) they will need to ensure the safety of students with disabilities. It also requires safeguards to ensure that EAs or SNAs do not work at multiple sites and risk transmitting the COVID-19 virus from one location to another.
  • Ministries should review policies and regulations to continue to permit the virtual provision of therapy supports and services that have transitioned successfully to a virtual learning environment and where possible, permit and foster increased access to therapies and services to areas in province where a lack of services exists.

Recommendations – School Boards

  • Many students with disabilities volunteer at school events, in school daycares, kindergarten classes as part of their learning plan, IEP or fulfilling the 40 hours volunteer requirement. School Boards should develop/review guidelines for students with disabilities who volunteer in school to limits risk to health and safety but does not stop this valuable learning experience for students with disabilities.
  • Many adults with disabilities volunteer in schools and school daycares for the opportunity to exist as a valued contributing member within their community. School Boards should develop guidelines for people with disabilities who volunteer within the school that limits risk to the health and safety but continues to have the opportunity to be a contributing member of the school community.
  • School Board should provide virtual learning opportunities for volunteering and co-op courses for students with disabilities. Resources and guidelines should be developed to create the opportunity for the student to complete volunteering hours or cooperative credits successfully.
  • School Boards should develop and/or review guidelines for transitions plans for students with disabilities to outline supports and accommodations that may be offered in a virtual learning environment or enhanced by online tools and resources to support the physical and emotions wellbeing of student with disabilities when transitioning back to school. Accommodations or strategies should be reviewed and adapted to the virtual learning environment to support transitions. (An example would be for students with disabilities have access to audio described (DV) and closed-captioned (CC) virtual tours of the school facilities, so students could familiarize themselves with the school prior to the start of school. (See also Transition section).
  • In consultation with community agencies, School Boards should develop/revise procedures and protocols for volunteers and community agencies that support the health and wellbeing of students with disabilities continue to operate in the school (Example, Food nutrition programs, clothing exchanges, etc.)
  • In consultation with Public Health Regional Health, School Boards must develop clear protocols and procedures with accommodations for students with disabilities for the detection, isolation, tracing and follow up those students who develop symptoms for the virus, flu, respiratory infection, etc. For example: Ensure dedicated space to isolate students with disabilities who may need to return home is accessible and provides the accommodations required to meets the needs of any students with disabilities.

Academic

The pandemic has had profound impacts to student’s learning and staff’s ability to provide a learning environment that promotes student success and achievement. Learning inequities for students with disabilities have increased throughout the pandemic due to barriers faced. Some of the barriers identified were:

Barriers

  • Ongoing accessibility issues with online and virtual learning resources provided for learning at home
  • Wealth of resources, tools, etc. being developed by Boards, Agencies and Associations with limited sharing of resources. Resources developed may not be accessible.
  • Virtual learning is not working for many students with disabilities
  • Many students with disabilities were not effectively engaged in virtual learning for a variety of reasons, including accessibility challenges with the internet, computer software and hardware, nature of resources provided, individual challenges related to format, capacity of family, or behaviour.
  • Closure of schools for 3 months has resulted in significant loss of learning for many students
  • Special Education Advisory Committees meetings have been cancelled and some the skills and knowledge of SEAC members has not been fully utilized.
  • Teachers, students and parents were not prepared for the sudden transition from in-class instruction to the virtual learning environment and planning for future interruptions of schools would benefit from proactive planning for education in a virtual instruction and learning environment.

Recommendations – Government

  • The Ministry of Education should develop curriculum for students from Kindergarten to Grade 12 to enable students to develop the skills and knowledge they need for learning in a virtual learning environment. In the interim, the Ministry should share existing, accessible resources on this topic to teachers and School Boards (Please see Training for additional recommendations)
  • The Ministry of Education should collect and make readily available resources/information on practices, effective strategies in learning environment, and alternate approaches for students struggling with online learning, etc. from School Boards, agencies and disability specific associations.
  • Ministry of Education should provide clear expectations for teacher led instruction, synchronous learning, and weekly teacher student-teacher connections for students who are participating in virtual instruction and learning. Expectations should include monitoring if students with disabilities are fully participating, learning and benefiting from these activities; and if not, action to address barriers or issues identified.

Recommendations – School Board

  • School Boards should assess and document accommodations, modifications, resources and supports for all students with disabilities to plan for transition back to school and continuation of virtual instruction and learning. (Please see Transitions Recommendations for details)
  • School Boards should develop and provide all resources for instruction and assessment materials, homework assignments in an accessible digital format (See Communications & Technology section for recommendation on accessible digital format).

Secondary School

The secondary school experience is different from elementary school. It is where students develop, time management, organizational, advocacy skills, networking and social skills, become more aware of community and identify career paths. It is for this reason, the Working Group felt it was important to identify barriers and make recommendations specific to secondary students. Many of these recommendations can benefit the entire secondary school student population.

Barriers

  • Students with disabilities have experienced little to no personal contact with their school community social network supports (classroom teachers, Educational Assistants, custodians, administrative assistants, etc.), who rely on this contact to maintain their engagement within the school community and preserve their mental health.
  • At any time, students with disabilities have very limited opportunity to fulfill the 40 hours of volunteering required for graduation and rely heavily on volunteering at their high school or local elementary school events. All opportunities for volunteering were eliminated during the pandemic.
  • Many students with disabilities take optional specialized courses such as Specialized High School Major (SHSM), cooperative credits, etc. which provide hands on and participation within the community. Hands on learning, skills in applicable to trades and life skills were significantly diminished during COVID-19.
  • Clubs, councils, sports teams and extracurricular activities are a formative and important part of the high school experience. Often these extracurricular activities are the only opportunity students with disabilities has to socialize with their peers. Not having access to extracurricular activities has impacted their mental health and well-being.
  • Many students with disabilities rely on in class instruction be it due to learning disability, anxiety, learning style, ADHD, or simply due to preference in the way they individually learn, among others. The loss of in-class instruction has significantly impacted their learning and future for success.
  • Learning at home during school closure has been challenging for students in terms of academic achievement, mental health and wellbeing
  • All four years of high school are an integral part of a young person’s development and a multitude of students require and rely on in class instruction be it for specialized courses That require specialized equipment, trained staff;
  • The experience of four years of high school are incredibly formative of a young person’s social, emotional, mental and physical relationship with society, the world around them and indeed the values they will build their life around;
  • Return to school planning must consider the impacts on minority & racialized students, students in abusive households, students with limited access to technology or broadband, students with disabilities and students with other complex learning needs;
  • Many students rely on in class instruction be it due to learning disability, anxiety, learning style, ADHD, or simply due to preference in the way they individually learn, among others;

Recommendations – Ministry

  • The Ministry of Education should allow high school in-class instruction to operate for the 2020-2021 school year, if authorized by Ontario’s Chief Medical Officer of Health.
  • The Minister should direct School Boards to continue courses which require specialized forms of equipment, classrooms, teaching staff and/or resources (science labs, shops, media classrooms) continue to operate, in accordance with local public health advice.
  • As per the Canadian Mental Health Association, 70% of mental health challenges have their onset in childhood or youth and the Kids Help Phone Line has seen a increase in demand, The Ministries of Education and Health should increase capacity of mental health professionals and supports for School Boards, to ensure there is no waitlist for any secondary student requiring support.
  • The Ministry of Education should include student voice through student trustees’ association or other student leaders, when developing a plan for return to school.
  • The Ministry of Education should waive the compulsory credit in Health & Physical Education for students who have entered secondary school in the 2020-21 school or whose timetable will be negatively impacted, should Physical Education classes not operate in the conventional manner.
  • If required by Public Health, the Ministry of Education should fund PPE for students and staff to mitigate risks of infection.
  • The Ministry should direct School Boards to develop a prioritization and execution plan for conducting clinical assessments (e.g., psycho–educational assessments) that students with disabilities require in order to access necessary supports and services as they transition from secondary to post-secondary destinations.

Recommendations – School Board

  • School Boards and Schools should include student voice, including students with disabilities in developing the Board return to school plan, as well as, individual school return plans respectively.
  • School Boards and Schools should provide clear instruction on proper personal protection equipment (PPE) and safety measures to students, parents, and staff.
  • School Boards should follow or mirror Public Health protocols prescribed by the local Public Health. If PPE is not required by the local Public Health, student have the choice to wear PPE. If PPE is required, that school boards are funded appropriately to provide PPE for all students and staff.
  • Where local public health advice can be adhered to, Schools should continue to offer extracurricular activities such as clubs, councils, teams using proper social distancing and general safety protocols.
  • Where applicable, School Boards should waive parking fees for students to reduce financial burdens and help mitigate health risks for students by not riding on a crowded public transit bus.
  • School Boards should make decisions pertaining to cancellation of extracurricular activities in school mirror that of activities outside of school. (Example: If soccer clubs operate locally, then soccer clubs in schools should continue to operate).
  • School Boards should develop and offer online programming for students who cannot or wish not to attend school in person, but not be considered a long-term alternative to in class instruction.
  • School Boards and schools seek out the voice of students, including voices of students with disabilities, when they develop return to school plan options.
  • School Board should develop guidelines for clubs or programs that supplement or enhance education for students with disabilities so they can continue to operate upon return to school.
  • School Boards should continue to offer where possible, alternate classrooms, quiet workspaces, and other special education requirements prescribed in a student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP).
  • School Boards should research and investigate potential online coop placements that may be available for all students; including students with disabilities.
  • When permitted under local health advice, the School Board should review new health and safety protocols with student and the coop placement provider.

Transitions

An impact of the pandemic for students with disabilities is that learning has been lost or stagnant. Learning recovery will be important when returning to school. This will mean targeted measures to reversing learning loss or closing gaps. There will be a need for clear system wide guidance for in-class and central assessments to inform and plan for curriculum delivery, supports and service upon return to school.

Transition planning will occur at the provincial, local and student level. The Ministry of Education will need to identify barriers and gaps from all educational stakeholders to develop an informed return to school plan. School boards will need identify barriers and gaps at a system and individual student level to create an informed back to school plan as well as address the needs for students with disabilities.

The Individual Education Plan (IEP) is a tool for documenting student strengths and needs and the accommodations, programs and services they require to be successful. IEPs are a valuable tool in documenting the student’s current level of achievement and transition plans for planned changes in grades, schools, and life after secondary school. The IEP can also be used to plan for return to school, full time or in an adapted model, or for continued virtual learning.

Barriers

  • During the school closure gaps in student skills and knowledge related to on-line and distance learning has been evident
  • Planning for school year 2020-2021 will include in school and distance learning
  • School staff will need to assess student’s with disabilities to determine their accessibility and learning needs
  • Students with disabilities individual IEPs and transitions plans need to be reviewed to address barriers and gaps to allow for student success.
  • Student voice often forgotten in the planning process
  • Students and prospective students cannot visit the physical environments of schools during the COVID-19 pandemic and do not have the opportunity to check for physical accessibility and familiarize themselves with environment

Recommendations – Government

  • The Ministry of Education should direct School Boards to develop a prioritization and execution plan for conducting clinical assessments (e.g., psycho–educational assessments) that students with disabilities require, in order to access necessary supports and services as they transition from secondary to post-secondary destinations.
  • The Ministry of Education, in partnership with MCCSS should work with school boards to identify their cohorts of students with intellectual and other disabilities who completed their school careers in June 2020 and identify and assess if barriers faced during COVID-19 did not allow for successful student transitions to their chosen pathway (Examples: to work, volunteer work, recreation/leisure programs, and post-secondary education) as outlined in their transition plans. Jointly, the Ministries and School Boards should develop plans to help this cohort of students with disabilities achieve their individual transition goals.

Recommendations – School Boards

  • School Boards should be independently collecting board wide data on gaps, barriers, emerging issues, transition challenges, technology challenges, additional students’ needs and supports arising or as a result of COVID-19 through assessment, student and parent feedback to address and plan for system wide supports and services required by students with disabilities upon return to school.
  • To help with successful transitions for student with disabilities in returning to school, School Boards shall contact parent/guardians, as soon as possible, to discuss and identify learning gaps, individual needs arising from school shutdown and distance learning, transition challenges, social and emotional needs to inform and revise/or create individualized transition plans for students with disabilities.
  • To help reduce stress and anxiety and prepare themselves for return to school, students with disabilities should be involved with discussions and decision made in developing their Transition Plan.
  • School Boards and Administrators shall ensure Individual Education Plans for students with disabilities are revised/created to reflect specific goals and activities to address the individual needs identified in Recommendation #3 to help increase academic and transition success for each student with a disability upon returning to school.
  • School Boards shall include the student when developing their individualized Transition and IEP. All
  • When School Boards develop the Individualized Transition Plans for each student, it should be:
    1. flexible to accommodate the stop and start of in class learning. All methods of instruction should be considered for learning to ensure students have access to an education (virtual instruction, in home instruction, etc.)
    2. include a flexible and hybrid model for entry needs to accommodate the varying student needs. Any model developed for return to school shall be developed in consultation with parent/guardians and student
    3. include strategies for students around social/physical distancing. Social distancing guidelines should be developed in consultation with parents/guardians and student.
    4. Include steps for follow up and checking in with the student
    5. All documentation or information be provided to the parent/guardian and student before the meeting with enough time to review. Documents should be provided in an accessible format.
  • School Boards should take more interactive approaches to collect on-going feedback from parents, students and staff (i.e. “Thought exchange”) to guide and inform changes to policies and procedures impacted by COVID-19.
  • School Boards should develop a clear system wide plan to address increased classroom and school supports and services (Educational Assistants, Education Works, social workers, psychologists, guidance councillors) identified through assessments to help mitigate issues and support learning for students with disabilities.
  • School Boards should create audio described (DV) and closed-captioned (CC) virtual tours of their school. The virtual tour must be fully accessible and thoroughly provide information on accessibility and locations at the schools. Virtual tours should be made permanently available; not just during the pandemic.

Communications & Technology

For our purpose, communication includes technologies, systems, protocols and procedures that enable an organization to effectively communicate to its employees, partners and community. During an emergency, communication is essential and should ensure all relevant personnel can quickly and effectively communicate with each other during such crises, sharing information that will allow the organization to quickly rectify the situation, protect employees and assets, and allows the business to continue.

To relate this to Education – government, school boards, agencies, staff, students, parent/caregivers, should have the ability to communicate effectively during a crisis, while the business of providing learning continues.

Barriers

  • Ongoing accessibility issues with virtual learning environment or platform (Examples: no closed captions, compatibility issues with screen readers, lack of support or knowledge of accessibility features, no ASL interpretation)
  • Ongoing accessibility issue with information and resources provided
  • Conflicting guidelines provided by different ministries and level of government.

Recommendations – Government

  • That a designated communication lead should be assigned at the provincial and regional level for consistent messaging.
  • For efficiency and elimination of duplication of effort for School Boards, The Ministry of Education should immediately engage an arms-length digital accessibility consultant to evaluate the comparative accessibility of different digital learning and virtual learning environments or platforms available for use in Ontario schools. This should involve end-user testing. The Ministry should immediately send the resulting report and comparison to all school boards and make it public. This should be revisited as the fall approaches, in case there have been changes to the relative accessibility of different virtual instruction environments or platforms.
  • The Ministry of Education should provide a list of acceptable accessible, cross platform virtual learning environments and synchronous teaching systems to be used by school boards.
  • The Ministry of Education should make public a plan of action to swiftly make its own online learning content accessible for people with disabilities, setting out milestones and timelines, and should report to the public on its progress.
  • The Ministry of Education should immediately direct TVO/TFO to make its online learning content accessible to people with disabilities, and to promptly make public a plan of action to achieve this goal, with specific milestones and timelines. The implementation of this recommendation has become urgent since Royal Assent was given to Bill 197, COVID-19 Economic Recovery Act, 2020 as amends to the Ontario Educational Communications Authority Act broaden the mandates of both TVO and TFO to position them to provide centralized support for online learning in the English-language and French-language publicly-funded education systems, respectively.
  • The Ministry of Education should direct its entire staff and all School Boards that whenever making information public in a Portable Document Format (PDF), it must at the same time, make available a textual format such as an accessible Microsoft Word (MSWord) or accessible HTML document. Videos must be audio described (DV) and closed captioned (CC). Templates and technical guides should be developed and provided to school boards.

Recommendations – School Boards

  • For consistent messaging, that the School board should designate a communication lead for COVID-19 related issues.
  • School Boards should develop protocols and procedures to mitigate security risks for online and virtual learning platforms to help protect privacy of students with disabilities and staff. Online and virtual learning platforms should also be accessible for all students with disabilities.
  • That School Boards should provide clear communication around protocols and return to school plans. Boards should make written communications readily available and accessible by everyone in the community, parents and students.
  • School Boards should review and revise instructional videos for parents around virtual learning tools used in the school board. Videos must be clear and accessible.
  • School Boards should provide solely dedicated or designated staff, who are available to support technology including accessibility needs to parents who are supporting the learning needs of students with disabilities at home.

Training

The COVID-19 Pandemic has changed the way in which education is delivered. Students, parents/guardians, teachers, staff, school boards and government had to change the way they access, support or deliver education. The pandemic highlighted gaps in digital skills, adaptation of technology to teaching and learning. It has also increased demand for technology and the need to integrate technology effectively into teaching and learning. With this increased demand in the use of technology and the gaps in digital skills identified, it is imperative to train students, parent/guardians and staff in the use and integration of technology in teaching and learning.

Barriers

  • Teachers, students and parent/guardians unprepared for learning at home and use of virtual platforms such as google classroom, Microsoft teams, Zoom for individual and synchronous learning
  • Teachers, ECEs, Staff need training in virtual online learning platforms
  • Teachers, ECEs, Staff need training in strategies to support students with disabilities around transitions between education models, including preparation for changing environments and self regulation
  • Teachers, ECEs lack training in strategies to support Public Health directed precautions, such as social distancing, sanitizing procedures and use of PPE when required to support students
  • School closures have had a significant impact on the mental health and well being of students with disabilities and teachers, ECEs, staff will require training on child development and trauma informed practice to assist them in supporting students in transitioning back to school or continuation of virtual education.
  • The expectation on parent/guardians to support students with learning at home were significant and parents need supports and training in virtual learning software and how they can effectively support their child’s learning.

Recommendations – Government

  • That Ministry of Education should model leadership to School Boards and provide accessible virtual learning webinars, templates for learning, etc. to be utilized in training administrators and teachers.
  • The Ministry of Education should direct School Boards to provide all staff training in child development, mental health and wellbeing to support the wellbeing and learning of students with disabilities.
  • The Government should provide direction to School Boards and Public Service agencies to develop a coordinated training delivery model to support parents of students with rehabilitation needs, mental health concerns or who have complex or significant medically needs, with the delivery of virtual care, including privacy protected health platforms such as OTN, ADcare.

Recommendations – School Boards

  • School Boards should provide focused, practical training for administrators and teachers to support students with disabilities’ health, wellbeing and learning in a mixed or virtual environment.
  • School Boards should provide administrators training and guidelines on supporting students with disabilities through transitioning and change.
  • School Boards should develop parent training modules and resources to enable parent/guardians to develop the skills and knowledge required to support online and virtual learning at home for students with disabilities.
  • School Boards should provide training for teachers and staff on specific tips and solutions, successful and evidence based promising practices by disability to support teachers and students with disabilities learning. These should be made available as soon as possible or at the latest, during the first days of PD before school instruction begins.

Transportation

School Bus operation and delivery of bus services is regulated and governed both federally and provincially. Transport Canada has consulted with the Public Health Agency of Canada to provide guidelines around bus operations during the pandemic. The National Association for Pupil Transportation (NAPT) has also provided general guidelines for the provision of student (pupil) transportation services.

The Ministry of Education’s Return to School Framework directs School Boards to follow these federal guidelines.

To accommodate Federal Transportation and Public health guideline that require social and physical distancing, School Boards will have to revise transportation services delivery that will impact bus routes, increase the number of buses and drivers required, increase ridership time, etc. to mitigate risks to students with disabilities while transporting to and from school.

Barriers

  • Lack of or reduced public transportation available for students with disabilities, particularly for secondary students who take public transit. Municipal governments eliminated routes or reduced schedules during COVID-19. Municipalities have not made public transportation plans for when students return to school.
  • As School Boards and Consortiums plan transportation services to meet the Transport Canada guidelines, current challenges of inadequate buses, shortage of drivers and increasing fuel costs will be a barrier to boards.
  • Changes to routine can have a significant impact to a student with disabilities’ mental health, success for the start of school day and learning. Predictable changes to transportation for students with disabilities can include, increased ridership time, bus route, bus type (72-passenger, small bus), supports or accommodations required for a successful ride, etc. while maintaining safety and mitigating risks for infection.
  • Many School Boards currently overspend the transportation grant, while still achieving a high efficiency rating from the Ministry of Education. The additional requirements defined under the Transport Canada Guidelines will increase cost pressures to provide transportation services to students with disabilities while maintaining safety and mitigating risk of infection.
  • As students with disabilities require may require specific transportation accommodations such as a safety harness, seat belt, wheelchair accessible which cannot be accommodated in all vehicle types.

Recommendations – School Boards

  • As many School Boards overspend its transportation grant while maintaining a high efficiency rating, the Ministry of Education should provide school boards with additional COVID-19 specific funding to follow the guidelines as provided by Transport Canada around:
    • Measures to mitigate risk of exposure
    • Procedures to be taken before a trip, during a trip and at the end of the trip
    • PPE guidelines
    • Physical Distancing
    • Shield and Enclosure system guidelines (if bus operators choose to do so)
  • School Boards should review transportation accommodations and requirements, in consultation with parents and student, IEPs of students with disabilities who require transportation services to identify any change/modifications to accommodations required. The student’s IEP shall be modified to reflect additional requirements to transport the student safely on the bus. The review for medically fragile students should include professionals, such as nurses, occupational therapists, as well as parents. All transportation requirements shall be relayed to the Bus Consortia and administrator of the school for implementation.
  • School Boards must create/revise a protocol for the safe gathering of all students and parent/guardians at bus stops and safety on the bus. It is important that student with disabilities be included and familiarized with these protocols with their peers.
  • School Boards and Bus Consortia should provide bus drivers with training on new health and safety protocols for students with disabilities on a regular bus, small bus and wheelchair accessible bus.
  • Bus Consortia should minimize changes to routes, vehicle type, and schedules for students with disabilities while developing changes to routes, to limit increased anxiety or behaviours as a result of the changes. When changes are considered, parents and student should be consulted about changes.
  • School Boards and Bus Consortia should review procedures and protocols for persons responsible for putting a student with disability’s harness on/off or supporting a student on the school bus to mitigate health risks for the student, bus driver and support person.
  • School Boards and Bus Consortia should revise/develop, implement and disseminate bus safety protocol Information for parents needs to help mitigate health and safety risks and assuage parent’s fears. This includes protocols around harnesses. All communications should be clear and made readily available on the Board and Bus Consortia website in an accessible digital format.
  • Students with disabilities should be included in any training that is provide for all students on enhanced safety rules on the bus.
  • As students with disabilities are statistically proven to be at a higher risk of infection, School Boards and Bus Consortia should implement enhanced student bus ridership attendance procedures to aid in tracing of COVID-19 and mitigating health risks.
  • Traffic volume, student and road safety is always a concern around schools. It is expected for vehicle traffic to increase when school returns, as parent/caregiver or a secondary student chooses to drive to school. School Boards should work collaboratively with Municipalities to develop safe arrival and departure awareness campaigns for students, parents/caregivers and buses. These campaigns could include guidelines for kiss & ride, audio described (DV) and closed captioned (CC) virtual or diagrams of vehicle traffic flows for entering and exiting school property from the street, identifying school bus only access areas, promote other methods of transportation, etc.

Conclusion

The Planning for Emergencies are please to provide its draft recommendations related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Working Group will continue to review resources and information on barriers and issues arising from COVID-19 and as students return to school. It will start work on its mandate to develop an emergency plan framework focused on students with disabilities (that covers the phases of preparing, planning, response and recovery) for a systematic response to an emergency.

Thank you to all the members of the Planning for Emergencies Working Group for their dedication in developing this draft set of recommendations. Working Group members are:

  • Donna Edwards (Chair – Working Group)
  • Stephan Andrews
  • David Lepofsky
  • Dr. Ashleigh Malloy
  • Alison Morse
  • Rana Nasrazadani
  • Ben Smith
  • Angelo Tocco
  • Dr. Lindy Zaretsky
  • Lynn Ziraldo (Chair K-12 SDC)

Glossary

Accessibility: a general term for the degree of ease that something (e.g., device, service, physical environment and information) can be accessed, used and enjoyed by persons with disabilities. The term implies conscious planning, design and/or effort to make sure something is barrier-free to persons with disabilities. Accessibility also benefits the general population, by making things more usable and practical for everyone, including older people and families with small children.

Accessible: does not have obstacles for people with disabilities – something that can be easily reached or obtained; facility that can be easily entered; information that is easy to access.

Accessible digital format: Information that is provided in digital form that is accessible such as HTML and MS Word.

Synchronous learning: is the kind of learning that happens in real time. This means that you, your classmates, and your instructor interact in a specific virtual place, through a specific online medium, at a specific time. In other words, it’s not exactly anywhere, anyhow, anytime. Methods of synchronous online learning include video conferencing, teleconferencing, live chatting, and live-streaming lectures.

Asynchronous learning: happens on your schedule. While your course of study, instructor or degree program will provide materials for reading, lectures for viewing, assignments for completing, and exams for evaluation, you have the ability to access and satisfy these requirements within a flexible time frame. Methods of asynchronous online learning include self-guided lesson modules, streaming video content, virtual libraries, posted lecture notes, and exchanges across discussion boards or social media platforms.

Distance Education Program: Programs to provide courses of study online, through correspondence, or by other means that do not require the physical attendance by the student at a school. (From Bill 197)

Special Education Services – As defined in the Education Act, “facilities and resources, including support personnel and equipment, necessary for developing and implementing a special education program”.

Virtual learning: is defined as learning that can functionally and effectively occur in the absence of traditional classroom environments (Simonson & Schlosser, 2006).

Virtual education: refers to instruction in a learning environment where teacher and student are separated by time or space, or both, and the teacher provides course content through course management applications, multimedia resources, the Internet, videoconferencing, etc. Students receive the content and communicate with the teacher via the same technologies.

Virtual learning environment: refers to a system that offers educators digitally-based solutions aimed at creating interactive, active learning environments. VLEs can help educators create, store and disseminate content, plan courses and lessons and foster communication between student and educator. Virtual learning environments are often part of an education institution’s wider learning management system (LMS).

Virtual instruction: is a method of teaching that is taught either entirely online or when elements of face-to-face courses are taught online through learning management systems and other educational tools and platforms. Virtual instruction also includes digitally transmitting course materials to student.

Resources

Mental Health

Public Health Guidance and Safety

 

Tools/Best Practices

Stakeholder Reports and Information

Additional Reading



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An Important New Report to the Ontario Government Calls on the Government and School Boards to Take Action Now to Ensure that One Third of a Million Students with Disabilities are Able to Fully Participate in Ontario Schools as They Re-Open This Fall


Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Society for All People with Disabilities
Web: http://www.aodaalliance.org Email: [email protected] Twitter: @aodaalliance Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/aodaalliance/

August 14, 2020

SUMMARY

We today share with you a very important new report that bears on the needs of a third of a million students with disabilities in Ontario-funded schools, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues. Three weeks ago, the Ford Government received a detailed report on the steps it needs to take to meet the needs of students with disabilities now and into the fall, in the face of the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. This thorough report, which we set out in full below, was written by a subcommittee of the Government-appointed K-12 Education Standards Development Committee. AODA Alliance Chair David Lepofsky serves on that Standards Development Committee and was one of the members of the subcommittee that collectively developed this report. The subcommittee included representation from the disability sector and the school board community.

We are delighted that this report includes the substance of all the recommendations that the AODA Alliance put forward in its June 19, 2020 brief to the Ontario Government on how to meet the needs of students with disabilities during school re-opening. It expands and enhances on the recommendations in the AODA Alliances June 19, 2020 brief to the Ontario Government. This report also goes further, adding other important recommendations.

With school re-opening fast approaching, it is important for the Ford Government to now announce a plan to implement these recommendations. Until the Ford Government does so, we call on all Ontario school boards to review this report and implement its recommendations in their plans for school re-opening.

We encourage one and all to send this report to your member of the Ontario legislature, your school board trustee, and your local media. Email Premier Doug Ford and Education Minister Stephen Lecce. Emphasize to all of them that this report needs immediate action.

The AODA Alliance has been spearheading a campaign for over a decade to tear down the barriers facing students with disabilities in Ontarios education system. We led the multi-year campaign to get the Ontario Government to agree to create an Education Accessibility Standard under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act .

For more background on these issues, please visit the AODA Alliances COVID-19 web page and our education web page. Check out the widely-viewed online video of the May 4, 2020 virtual Town Hall on meeting the needs of students with disabilities during the COVID-19 crisis, co-organized by the Ontario Autism Coalition and the AODA Alliance.

Stay safe, and let us know what you do to help us press for these reforms. Email us at [email protected]

MORE DETAILS

July 24, 2020 Letter to the Ontario Minister of Education and Minister for Accessibility from the Chair of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee

Date: Friday, July 24, 2020

The Honourable Stephen Lecce
Minister of Education
5th Floor, 438 University Avenue,
Toronto,Ontario M7A 2A5

The Honourable Raymond Cho
Minister for Seniors and Accessibility
5th Floor, 777 Bay Street,
Toronto, Ontario M7A 1S5

Dear Minister Lecce and Minister Cho,

Re: K-12 Education Standards Development Committee: Planning for Emergencies and Safety Small Group Report

On behalf of the members of the Planning for Emergencies and Safety small group (the small group), I am pleased to submit the small groups advice and recommendations on emergency planning and safety for students with disabilities in K-12 education during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The K-12 Education Standards Development Committee (The Committee) formed the small group when the Ministry of Education was seeking feedback from the Committee on the barriers and issues identified through the COVID-19 pandemic. The small groups mandate includes using experiential learning from the COVID-19 pandemic to:

* identify new and reoccurring accessibility barriers to learning for students with disabilities in the context of remote learning; and
* develop an emergency plan framework (that covers the phases of preparing, planning, response and recovery) for a systematic response to an emergency.
The small group members have put incredible effort, time and passion to complete this report that includes valuable advice and recommendations for government consideration. The report addresses the following 9 barriers for students with disabilities as a result of COVID-19: 1. organizational, policy and procedural barriers
2. mental health and well being
3. academic (learning inequities for students with disabilities) 4. support for secondary school students with disabilities
5. transitions between in school and virtual learning
6. accessible communication and technology
7. training on the integration of digital technology into learning 8. transportation
9. recommendations addressing barriers for the Government and School Boards in emergency planning and safety

Thank you for your shared commitment to ensuring accessibility and inclusion for students with disabilities in Ontario. We have appreciated the discussions with Minister Lecce on Grants for Students Needs funding and the school board memos that address the current work being done to support students. The barriers in our report reflect what we have heard from various educational partners, families of student with disabilities and students within Ontario. I would be happy to meet with you to discuss these additional recommendations. The work and passion of the Committee continues, and we look forward to more opportunities to share our advice and feedback with you.

Together we can create an accessible and inclusive education system for students with disabilities during this unprecedented time.

Sincerely,

(Original signed by)

Lynn Ziraldo,
Chair, K-12 Education Standards Development Committee

Attachments:
1. Small group report

July 24, 2020 Report to the Ontario Government from the Planning for Emergencies and Safety Subcommittee of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee

July 24, 2020

Introduction
The COVID-19 Pandemic has tested emergency plans for all levels of government, businesses, agencies, education systems, communities, families, and citizens in the province of Ontario. Many risks have been identified and challenges have arisen because of the pandemic and more continue to be identified as we move through the stages of the emergency. Emergency plans, response and procedures need to be reviewed to address these risks and barriers immediately and to improve responses to emergencies in the future.
As the Ministry of Education was seeking feedback on barriers and emerging issues identified during the COVID-19 Pandemic, the K-12 Standards Development Committee formed the Planning for Emergency and Safety Working Group with a focus on students with disabilities with the following mandate: Using experiential learning from the COVID-19 pandemic:
* Identify new and reoccurring accessibility barriers to learning for students with disabilities in the context of remote learning
* Develop an emergency plan framework (that covers the phases of preparing, planning, response and recovery) for a systematic response to an emergency. Methodology
The Planning for Emergencies & Safety Working Group gathered resources from experts including the Framework for Reopening Schools developed by UNICEF, SickKids recommendations to Reopening Schools, Letters to Minister Lecce from the Ontario Human Rights Commission of July 14, 2020; and various other resources and articles from educational partners within Ontario, other provinces and countries (See Resource Section). While reviewing the documents, the Working Group identified barriers and subsequently developed recommendations to address said barriers. Organizational Challenges and Barriers during COVID-19
Through a review of resources, feedback from parents and guardians, agencies, health professionals and educational stakeholders opinions expressed, the Working Group found that students with disabilities have faced challenges compounded by COVID-19. Their needs have been inconsistently addressed or not at all. These are some organizational, policy and procedural barriers identified:
– Inconsistent or unclear messaging from varying levels of government, health agencies and school boards
– Lack of or unable to access consistent data from all regions and school boards to support data driven decisions and implement actions quickly and effectively.
– Policies and procedures outdated, non-existent, or inflexible to accommodate this type of emergency COVID-19 pandemic.
– Emergency response teams not reflecting the different subject knowledge needed to support decision making and development of a plan that reflects the needs of students with disabilities.
– Inter-governmental, health service, service agencies and school board service agreements did not reflect the ability to provide services in a virtual learning environment
– Service delivery models used by government, health services, service agencies and school boards not conducive to virtual service delivery.
– The extent to which Boards utilized or sought feedback from its SEACs in developing response or action plans to the COVID-19 pandemic varied from none to fully participated.
– Not all school boards have an Accessibility Standards Committee or for those school boards that do have members of the community or people with disabilities who have lived experience that can help plan and implement the Public Health Guidelines to mitigate risks of COVID-19 in schools for students with disabilities
– School board Accessibility Standards Committee can be helpful in helping to plan and implement the Public Health Guidelines to mitigate risks of COVID-19 in schools for students with disabilities. However, not all school boards have such committees, or committee membership that includes members of the community or people with disabilities who have lived experience that can inform planning and implementation. Key Recommendations for Planning for Emergencies
It is important in planning for return to school, the opportunity is taken to review and create structures, policy and procedures that can adapt and be more flexible for a 2nd wave or future emergencies.
By learning from innovations and emergency processes, systems can adapt and scale up the more effective solutions. In doing so, they could become more effective, more agile, and more resilient (quoted from THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC: SHOCKS TO EDUCATION AND POLICY RESPONSES, World Bank).
There are 5 known steps to Emergency Planning and Preparedness: 1) Know your risk, 2) Build your Team, 3) Make critical information accessible quickly, 4) Update alert and response procedure, 5) Test the plan and revise.
To eliminate barriers identified, that a return to school plan has input from end users, be designed through an inclusive process and not by one team or group. A team of subject expertise from across the organization is critical for developing a strong plan. Recommendations Government

For the above reasons, it is recommended that
1) The Ministry of Education should establish a Central Education Leadership Command Table with responsibilities for ensuring that students with disabilities have access to all accommodations and supports they require during the present COVID-19 pandemic. The responsibilities of the Command Table shall include:
a) immediately develop a comprehensive plan to meet the urgent learning needs of students with disabilities during COVID-19 pandemic quickly and resolve issues for students with disabilities as they arise. The comprehensive plan should be shared for implementation by school boards. This plan should include and incorporate the three options for education: * normal school day routine with enhanced public health protocols
* modified school day routine based on smaller class sizes, cohorting and alternative day or week delivery, and, * at-home learning with ongoing enhanced remote delivery
b) collect and share data on existing and emerging issues as a result of COVID-19, the effective responses of other jurisdictions in supporting students with disabilities during the current emergency, using evidence base data collection method for people with disabilities
c) establish a fully accessible centralized hub, and share and publicize the hub, for sharing of effective practices about supporting students with disabilities
d) develop a rapid response team to receive feedback from school boards on recurring issues facing students with disabilities and to help find solutions to share with school boards
e) provide clear communication and guidance on school opening, health service delivery, etc. based on data collected.

2) The government/Ministry of Education shall establish a cross sectorial Partnership Table at provincial and regional levels with the responsibility to integrate, coordinate and foster cross sector planning and response to emergencies. Responsibilities of this table are to:
a) enhance an interlinked, coordinated and inter-ministerial approach in providing a seamless service delivery model to provide services and supports to students with disabilities (Psychology, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Mental Health, etc.).
b) collect data now, from respective sectors, health services, education, service agencies, etc. to identify existing and emerging barriers, know exactly which students with disabilities and how they are impacted, their needs, and how to better direct resources to support them
c) provide clear communication and guidance on school opening, health service delivery, etc. based on data collected to ensure accessibility for students with disabilities.
3) The Ministry of Education provincial and regional partnership tables should include advisors that can provide insight on the needs and challenges of students with disabilities from lived experience and the collective experience of disability support groups, as well as students with disabilities.
4) The Ministry of Education should assign staff to assist the Central Educational Command Table by serving as a central rapid response team to receive feedback from school boards on recurring issues facing students with disabilities and to help find solutions to share with school boards.
5) The Ministry of Education should direct that each school board shall establish a similar Board Command table. (See recommendation 12 for School Boards).
6) The provincial government continue and enhance an interlinked, coordinated and inter-ministerial approach in providing a seamless service delivery model to provide services and supports to students with disabilities (Psychology, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Mental Health, etc.).
7) The Ministry of Education should collect and aggregate International data, resources and information from other countries experiences for use in planning transitions between in-school and distance education, including continuation of virtual learning at home.
8) The Ministry of Education should developed comprehensive plans for students with disabilities that addresses the surge in demand and increase capacity to provide specialized disability supports, including enhanced staffing, for the return to in-class and distance learning (increase in in-class supports, social workers, psychologists, guidance counsellors)
9) The Ministry of Education should develop guidelines that provide for alternate or enhanced childcare opportunities to be made available to families of students with a disability, for students required to stay home due to adapted model classroom scheduling. (Excludes childcare needs that are related to quarantine self-isolation for child or family due to exposure or a local outbreak of the virus.)
10) To get the most from the volunteer work of SEACs around Ontario, the Ministry of Education should:
a) Create and maintain a listserv or other virtual network of all Ontario SEACs, to enable them to share their efforts with all other SEACs around Ontario, and
b) Frequently gather input from SEACs around Ontario about the experiences of students with disabilities during the COVID-19 crisis to inform future policies and regulations and directions for school boards.
11) To promote transparency, accountability and identify trends, the Ministry of Education should immediately issue a policy direction for boards to create an exclusion policy, that imposes restrictions on when and how a principal may exclude a student from school, including directions that:
a) Does not impede, create barrier, or disproportionally increase burdens for students with disabilities the right to attend school for the entire day as do students without disabilities. The power to refuse to admit a student to school for all or part of the school day should not be used in a way that disproportionately burdens students with disabilities or that creates a barrier to their right to attend school.
b) Tracks exclusions and provide a transparent procedure and practice to parents/guardians, by requiring a principal who refuses to admit a student to school during the school re-opening process to immediately give the student and their parent/guardian written notice of their decision to do so, including written reasons for the refusal to admit, the duration of the refusal to admit and notice of the parent/guardians right to appeal this refusal to admit to the school board.
c) Tracks exclusions, increases accountability and informs policies by requiring a principal who refuses to admit a student to school for all or part of the school day to immediately report this in writing to their school boards senior management, including the reasons for the exclusion, its duration and whether the student has a disability. Each school board should be required to compile this information and to report it on a regular basis to the board of trustees, the public and the Ministry of Education (with individual information totally anonymized).
12) The Ministry of Education should provide clear guidelines and expectations to school boards on the implementation of Public Health Guidelines to mitigate risks of COVID-19 to ensure that school buildings and grounds be fully accessible for students with disabilities. Recommendations School Boards

13) School Boards should establish a similar Board Command/Central table as the Ministry of Educations Central Education Command/Central Table, to receive and act on feedback from teachers, principals and families about problems they are encountering serving students with disabilities during the COVID-19 period. The Table will quickly network with similar offices/Tables at other school boards and can report recurring issues to the Ministrys command table.
14) School Boards should utilize the expertise of the Special Education Advisory Committee members by directly involving members in the planning for the delivery of remote learning, other emergency plans, through regular meetings and frequent communications.
15) School Boards should enhance its hub of resources with successful practices, lesson plans, resources specific to students with disabilities in a virtual learning environment for ease of access and support teachers and students in their learning.
16) School Boards should involve their Accessibility Committee, or if there is no committee to establish an Accessibility Advisory Committee which will review all plans at the school board and school level for mitigating risk of COVID-19 meet the accessibility requirements of all students or people with disabilities.
17) School Boards should assign a leadership staff member responsible for ensuring that all changes at schools in response to COVID-19 maintain accessibility for all students with disabilities. Mental Health & Well Being
As found through the review of resources, student and family mental health & wellbeing needs have soared to due to the traumatic effects of COVID-19. Students wellbeing has suffered for a variety of barriers: effects of isolation from social distancing, increased rise in domestic violence, lack of access to school breakfast programs, lack of access to mental health & therapeutic services, and negative financial impact to familys income to name a few. Barriers

* Agencies, different levels of government and school boards developing plans and working on solutions to barriers with little or no coordination * Support for parents with students with complex needs are insufficient
* Health services and supports not consistently or sufficiently prepared to provide health and mental health services in a virtual setting
* There is a flood of information and resources being presented to teachers, parents and students
* More inter-ministerial leadership and collaboration between Ministries of Education (MOE), Community, Children & Social Services (MCCSS) and Health (MOH) is required
* School Boards and staff must be equipped with appropriate PPE for their own health and wellbeing
* Need to safely deliver additional supports such and as breakfast & nutrition programs provided by community agencies
* Plans for the next phase include a return to in-class and virtual instruction, including adapted models whereby some students will be scheduled at home on an alternate day or alternate week basis. Having students at home for short or long periods (alternate day to full semester) will be a significant challenge for families and may prevent the return to work for many parents. Some parents of children with disabilities face barriers to employment, and many others are overburdened with providing 24-hour care to students with complex care needs.

Recommendations Government

18) The government should enhance the central hub of mental health & wellbeing information resources at provincial and regional levels with key messages and links to other resources. Ensure all resources are in an accessible digital format (as per Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation), well publicised and shared with school boards.
19) Ministries should review and increase capacity of Ontario Telehealth Network (OTN) and other privacy protected health platforms to allow for boards to use (even in non-emergency times) and deliver services by regulated health care professionals that protect the privacy of the health services and IPRCs.
20) Ministries of Education, Health and Children, Community & Social Services should remove any cross-jurisdictional barriers related to the provision of health and education services to ensure students with disabilities can be provided with the mental health & wellbeing services they require to be delivered remotely. (For example, under Policy/Program Memorandum (PPM) 149, Protocol for Partnerships with External Agencies for Provision of Services by Regulated Health Professionals, Regulated Social Service Professionals, and Paraprofessionals permit electric consent for services and virtual access to services for students with disabilities).
21) The Ministry of Education should provide funding and clear guidelines on use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and protocols for detection and containment of COVID-19 for boards, staff and all students, including those with disabilities. Public health authorities should establish clear protocols for the detection and containment of COVID-19 (and other infectious diseases) for school boards. The guidelines and protocols should be flexible for school boards to react to local situations to mitigate risks.
22) The Ministry of Educations plan for school re-openings must include detailed directions on required measures to mitigate risk for students with disabilities from COVID-19 to maintain their health and wellbeing during any return to school. This requires additional planning in advance by school boards and additional funding to school boards to hire and train the additional Special Needs Assistants (SNA) and Educational Assistants (EA) they will need to ensure the safety of students with disabilities. It also requires safeguards to ensure that EAs or SNAs do not work at multiple sites and risk transmitting the COVID-19 virus from one location to another.
23) Ministries should review policies and regulations to continue to permit the virtual provision of therapy supports and services that have transitioned successfully to a virtual learning environment and where possible, permit and foster increased access to therapies and services to areas in province where a lack of services exists. Recommendations School Boards

24) Many students with disabilities volunteer at school events, in school daycares, kindergarten classes as part of their learning plan, IEP or fulfilling the 40 hours volunteer requirement. School Boards should develop/review guidelines for students with disabilities who volunteer in school to limits risk to health and safety but does not stop this valuable learning experience for students with disabilities.
25) Many adults with disabilities volunteer in schools and school daycares for the opportunity to exist as a valued contributing member within their community. School Boards should develop guidelines for people with disabilities who volunteer within the school that limits risk to the health and safety but continues to have the opportunity to be a contributing member of the school community.
26) School Board should provide virtual learning opportunities for volunteering and co-op courses for students with disabilities. Resources and guidelines should be developed to create the opportunity for the student to complete volunteering hours or cooperative credits successfully.
27) School Boards should develop and/or review guidelines for transitions plans for students with disabilities to outline supports and accommodations that may be offered in a virtual learning environment or enhanced by online tools and resources to support the physical and emotions wellbeing of student with disabilities when transitioning back to school. Accommodations or strategies should be reviewed and adapted to the virtual learning environment to support transitions. (An example would be for students with disabilities have access to audio described (DV) and closed-captioned (CC) virtual tours of the school facilities, so students could familiarize themselves with the school prior to the start of school. (See also Transition section).
28) In consultation with community agencies, School Boards should develop/revise procedures and protocols for volunteers and community agencies that support the health and wellbeing of students with disabilities continue to operate in the school (Example, Food nutrition programs, clothing exchanges, etc.)
29) In consultation with Public Health Regional Health, School Boards must develop clear protocols and procedures with accommodations for students with disabilities for the detection, isolation, tracing and follow up those students who develop symptoms for the virus, flu, respiratory infection, etc. For example: Ensure dedicated space to isolate students with disabilities who may need to return home is accessible and provides the accommodations required to meets the needs of any students with disabilities. Academic
The pandemic has had profound impacts to students learning and staffs ability to provide a learning environment that promotes student success and achievement. Learning inequities for students with disabilities have increased throughout the pandemic due to barriers faced. Some of the barriers identified were: Barriers

* Ongoing accessibility issues with online and virtual learning resources provided for learning at home
* Wealth of resources, tools, etc. being developed by Boards, Agencies and Associations with limited sharing of resources. Resources developed may not be accessible. * Virtual learning is not working for many students with disabilities
* Many students with disabilities were not effectively engaged in virtual learning for a variety of reasons, including accessibility challenges with the internet, computer software and hardware, nature of resources provided, individual challenges related to format, capacity of family, or behaviour.
* Closure of schools for 3 months has resulted in significant loss of learning for many students
* Special Education Advisory Committees meetings have been cancelled and some the skills and knowledge of SEAC members has not been fully utilized.
* Teachers, students and parents were not prepared for the sudden transition from in-class instruction to the virtual learning environment and planning for future interruptions of schools would benefit from proactive planning for education in a virtual instruction and learning environment. Recommendations Government

30) The Ministry of Education should develop curriculum for students from Kindergarten to Grade 12 to enable students to develop the skills and knowledge they need for learning in a virtual learning environment. In the interim, the Ministry should share existing, accessible resources on this topic to teachers and School Boards (Please see Training for additional recommendations)
31) The Ministry of Education should collect and make readily available resources/information on practices, effective strategies in learning environment, and alternate approaches for students struggling with online learning, etc. from School Boards, agencies and disability specific associations.
32) Ministry of Education should provide clear expectations for teacher led instruction, synchronous learning, and weekly teacher student-teacher connections for students who are participating in virtual instruction and learning. Expectations should include monitoring if students with disabilities are fully participating, learning and benefiting from these activities; and if not, action to address barriers or issues identified.

Recommendations School Board

33) School Boards should assess and document accommodations, modifications, resources and supports for all students with disabilities to plan for transition back to school and continuation of virtual instruction and learning. (Please see Transitions Recommendations for details)
34) School Boards should develop and provide all resources for instruction and assessment materials, homework assignments in an accessible digital format (See Communications & Technology section for recommendation on accessible digital format). Secondary School
The secondary school experience is different from elementary school. It is where students develop, time management, organizational, advocacy skills, networking and social skills, become more aware of community and identify career paths. It is for this reason, the Working Group felt it was important to identify barriers and make recommendations specific to secondary students. Many of these recommendations can benefit the entire secondary school student population. Barriers
* Students with disabilities have experienced little to no personal contact with their school community social network supports (classroom teachers, Educational Assistants, custodians, administrative assistants, etc.), who rely on this contact to maintain their engagement within the school community and preserve their mental health.
* At any time, students with disabilities have very limited opportunity to fulfill the 40 hours of volunteering required for graduation and rely heavily on volunteering at their high school or local elementary school events. All opportunities for volunteering were eliminated during the pandemic.
* Many students with disabilities take optional specialized courses such as Specialized High School Major (SHSM), cooperative credits, etc. which provide hands on and participation within the community. Hands on learning, skills in applicable to trades and life skills were significantly diminished during COVID-19.
* Clubs, councils, sports teams and extracurricular activities are a formative and important part of the high school experience. Often these extracurricular activities are the only opportunity students with disabilities has to socialize with their peers. Not having access to extracurricular activities has impacted their mental health and well-being.
* Many students with disabilities rely on in class instruction be it due to learning disability, anxiety, learning style, ADHD, or simply due to preference in the way they individually learn, among others. The loss of in-class instruction has significantly impacted their learning and future for success.
* Learning at home during school closure has been challenging for students in terms of academic achievement, mental health and wellbeing
* All four years of high school are an integral part of a young persons development and a multitude of students require and rely on in class instruction be it for specialized courses That require specialized equipment, trained staff;
* The experience of four years of high school are incredibly formative of a young persons social, emotional, mental and physical relationship with society, the world around them and indeed the values they will build their life around;
* Return to school planning must consider the impacts on minority & racialized students, students in abusive households, students with limited access to technology or broadband, students with disabilities and students with other complex learning needs;
* Many students rely on in class instruction be it due to learning disability, anxiety, learning style, ADHD, or simply due to preference in the way they individually learn, among others; Recommendations Ministry

35) The Ministry of Education should allow high school in-class instruction to operate for the 2020-2021 school year, if authorized by Ontarios Chief Medical Officer of Health.
36) The Minister should direct School Boards to continue courses which require specialized forms of equipment, classrooms, teaching staff and/or resources (science labs, shops, media classrooms) continue to operate, in accordance with local public health advice.
37) As per the Canadian Mental Health Association, 70% of mental health challenges have their onset in childhood or youth and the Kids Help Phone Line has seen a increase in demand, The Ministries of Education and Health should increase capacity of mental health professionals and supports for School Boards, to ensure there is no waitlist for any secondary student requiring support.
38) The Ministry of Education should include student voice through student trustees association or other student leaders, when developing a plan for return to school.
39) The Ministry of Education should waive the compulsory credit in Health & Physical Education for students who have entered secondary school in the 2020-21 school or whose timetable will be negatively impacted, should Physical Education classes not operate in the conventional manner.
40) If required by Public Health, the Ministry of Education should fund PPE for students and staff to mitigate risks of infection.
41) The Ministry should direct School Boards to develop a prioritization and execution plan for conducting clinical assessments (e.g., psycho–educational assessments) that students with disabilities require in order to access necessary supports and services as they transition from secondary to post-secondary destinations. Recommendations School Board

42) School Boards and Schools should include student voice, including students with disabilities in developing the Board return to school plan, as well as, individual school return plans respectively.
43) School Boards and Schools should provide clear instruction on proper personal protection equipment (PPE) and safety measures to students, parents, and staff.
44) School Boards should follow or mirror Public Health protocols prescribed by the local Public Health. If PPE is not required by the local Public Health, student have the choice to wear PPE. If PPE is required, that school boards are funded appropriately to provide PPE for all students and staff.
45) Where local public health advice can be adhered to, Schools should continue to offer extracurricular activities such as clubs, councils, teams using proper social distancing and general safety protocols.
46) Where applicable, School Boards should waive parking fees for students to reduce financial burdens and help mitigate health risks for students by not riding on a crowded public transit bus.
47) School Boards should make decisions pertaining to cancellation of extracurricular activities in school mirror that of activities outside of school. (Example: If soccer clubs operate locally, then soccer clubs in schools should continue to operate).
48) School Boards should develop and offer online programming for students who cannot or wish not to attend school in person, but not be considered a long-term alternative to in class instruction.
49) School Boards and schools seek out the voice of students, including voices of students with disabilities, when they develop return to school plan options.
50) School Board should develop guidelines for clubs or programs that supplement or enhance education for students with disabilities so they can continue to operate upon return to school.
51) School Boards should continue to offer where possible, alternate classrooms, quiet workspaces, and other special education requirements prescribed in a students Individual Education Plan (IEP).
52) School Boards should research and investigate potential online coop placements that may be available for all students; including students with disabilities.
53) When permitted under local health advice, the School Board should review new health and safety protocols with student and the coop placement provider. Transitions
An impact of the pandemic for students with disabilities is that learning has been lost or stagnant. Learning recovery will be important when returning to school. This will mean targeted measures to reversing learning loss or closing gaps. There will be a need for clear system wide guidance for in-class and central assessments to inform and plan for curriculum delivery, supports and service upon return to school.
Transition planning will occur at the provincial, local and student level. The Ministry of Education will need to identify barriers and gaps from all educational stakeholders to develop an informed return to school plan. School boards will need identify barriers and gaps at a system and individual student level to create an informed back to school plan as well as address the needs for students with disabilities.
The Individual Education Plan (IEP) is a tool for documenting student strengths and needs and the accommodations, programs and services they require to be successful. IEPs are a valuable tool in documenting the students current level of achievement and transition plans for planned changes in grades, schools, and life after secondary school. The IEP can also be used to plan for return to school, full time or in an adapted model, or for continued virtual learning. Barriers
* During the school closure gaps in student skills and knowledge related to on-line and distance learning has been evident
* Planning for school year 2020-2021 will include in school and distance learning
* School staff will need to assess students with disabilities to determine their accessibility and learning needs
* Students with disabilities individual IEPs and transitions plans need to be reviewed to address barriers and gaps to allow for student success. * Student voice often forgotten in the planning process
* Students and prospective students cannot visit the physical environments of schools during the COVID-19 pandemic and do not have the opportunity to check for physical accessibility and familiarize themselves with environment Recommendations Government

54) The Ministry of Education should direct School Boards to develop a prioritization and execution plan for conducting clinical assessments (e.g., psycho–educational assessments) that students with disabilities require, in order to access necessary supports and services as they transition from secondary to post-secondary destinations.
55) The Ministry of Education, in partnership with MCCSS should work with school boards to identify their cohorts of students with intellectual and other disabilities who completed their school careers in June 2020 and identify and assess if barriers faced during COVID-19 did not allow for successful student transitions to their chosen pathway (Examples: to work, volunteer work, recreation/leisure programs, and post-secondary education) as outlined in their transition plans. Jointly, the Ministries and School Boards should develop plans to help this cohort of students with disabilities achieve their individual transition goals. Recommendations School Boards

56) School Boards should be independently collecting board wide data on gaps, barriers, emerging issues, transition challenges, technology challenges, additional students needs and supports arising or as a result of COVID-19 through assessment, student and parent feedback to address and plan for system wide supports and services required by students with disabilities upon return to school.
57) To help with successful transitions for student with disabilities in returning to school, School Boards shall contact parent/guardians, as soon as possible, to discuss and identify learning gaps, individual needs arising from school shutdown and distance learning, transition challenges, social and emotional needs to inform and revise/or create individualized transition plans for students with disabilities.
58) To help reduce stress and anxiety and prepare themselves for return to school, students with disabilities should be involved with discussions and decision made in developing their Transition Plan.
59) School Boards and Administrators shall ensure Individual Education Plans for students with disabilities are revised/created to reflect specific goals and activities to address the individual needs identified in Recommendation #3 to help increase academic and transition success for each student with a disability upon returning to school.
60) School Boards shall include the student when developing their individualized Transition and IEP. All
61) When School Boards develop the Individualized Transition Plans for each student, it should be:
a) flexible to accommodate the stop and start of in class learning. All methods of instruction should be considered for learning to ensure students have access to an education (virtual instruction, in home instruction, etc.)
b) include a flexible and hybrid model for entry needs to accommodate the varying student needs. Any model developed for return to school shall be developed in consultation with parent/guardians and student
c) include strategies for students around social/physical distancing. Social distancing guidelines should be developed in consultation with parents/guardians and student. d) Include steps for follow up and checking in with the student
e) All documentation or information be provided to the parent/guardian and student before the meeting with enough time to review. Documents should be provided in an accessible format.
62) School Boards should take more interactive approaches to collect on-going feedback from parents, students and staff (i.e. Thought exchange) to guide and inform changes to policies and procedures impacted by COVID-19.
63) School Boards should develop a clear system wide plan to address increased classroom and school supports and services (Educational Assistants, Education Works, social workers, psychologists, guidance councillors) identified through assessments to help mitigate issues and support learning for students with disabilities.
64) School Boards should create audio described (DV) and closed-captioned (CC) virtual tours of their school. The virtual tour must be fully accessible and thoroughly provide information on accessibility and locations at the schools. Virtual tours should be made permanently available; not just during the pandemic. Communications & Technology
For our purpose, communication includes technologies, systems, protocols and procedures that enable an organization to effectively communicate to its employees, partners and community. During an emergency, communication is essential and should ensure all relevant personnel can quickly and effectively communicate with each other during such crises, sharing information that will allow the organization to quickly rectify the situation, protect employees and assets, and allows the business to continue.
To relate this to Education government, school boards, agencies, staff, students, parent/caregivers, should have the ability to communicate effectively during a crisis, while the business of providing learning continues. Barriers
* Ongoing accessibility issues with virtual learning environment or platform (Examples: no closed captions, compatibility issues with screen readers, lack of support or knowledge of accessibility features, no ASL interpretation) * Ongoing accessibility issue with information and resources provided
* Conflicting guidelines provided by different ministries and level of government. Recommendations Government

65) That a designated communication lead should be assigned at the provincial and regional level for consistent messaging.
66) For efficiency and elimination of duplication of effort for School Boards, The Ministry of Education should immediately engage an arms-length digital accessibility consultant to evaluate the comparative accessibility of different digital learning and virtual learning environments or platforms available for use in Ontario schools. This should involve end-user testing. The Ministry should immediately send the resulting report and comparison to all school boards and make it public. This should be revisited as the fall approaches, in case there have been changes to the relative accessibility of different virtual instruction environments or platforms.
67) The Ministry of Education should provide a list of acceptable accessible, cross platform virtual learning environments and synchronous teaching systems to be used by school boards.
68) The Ministry of Education should make public a plan of action to swiftly make its own online learning content accessible for people with disabilities, setting out milestones and timelines, and should report to the public on its progress.
69) The Ministry of Education should immediately direct TVO/TFO to make its online learning content accessible to people with disabilities, and to promptly make public a plan of action to achieve this goal, with specific milestones and timelines. The implementation of this recommendation has become urgent since Royal Assent was given to Bill 197, COVID-19 Economic Recovery Act, 2020 as amends to the Ontario Educational Communications Authority Act broaden the mandates of both TVO and TFO to position them to provide centralized support for online learning in the English-language and French-language publicly-funded education systems, respectively.
70) The Ministry of Education should direct its entire staff and all School Boards that whenever making information public in a Portable Document Format (PDF), it must at the same time, make available a textual format such as an accessible Microsoft Word (MSWord) or accessible HTML document. Videos must be audio described (DV) and closed captioned (CC). Templates and technical guides should be developed and provided to school boards. Recommendations School Boards

71) For consistent messaging, that the School board should designate a communication lead for COVID-19 related issues.
72) School Boards should develop protocols and procedures to mitigate security risks for online and virtual learning platforms to help protect privacy of students with disabilities and staff. Online and virtual learning platforms should also be accessible for all students with disabilities.
73) That School Boards should provide clear communication around protocols and return to school plans. Boards should make written communications readily available and accessible by everyone in the community, parents and students.
74) School Boards should review and revise instructional videos for parents around virtual learning tools used in the school board. Videos must be clear and accessible.
75) School Boards should provide solely dedicated or designated staff, who are available to support technology including accessibility needs to parents who are supporting the learning needs of students with disabilities at home. Training
The COVID-19 Pandemic has changed the way in which education is delivered. Students, parents/guardians, teachers, staff, school boards and government had to change the way they access, support or deliver education. The pandemic highlighted gaps in digital skills, adaptation of technology to teaching and learning. It has also increased demand for technology and the need to integrate technology effectively into teaching and learning. With this increased demand in the use of technology and the gaps in digital skills identified, it is imperative to train students, parent/guardians and staff in the use and integration of technology in teaching and learning. Barriers
* Teachers, students and parent/guardians unprepared for learning at home and use of virtual platforms such as google classroom, Microsoft teams, Zoom for individual and synchronous learning * Teachers, ECEs, Staff need training in virtual online learning platforms
* Teachers, ECEs, Staff need training in strategies to support students with disabilities around transitions between education models, including preparation for changing environments and self regulation
* Teachers, ECEs lack training in strategies to support Public Health directed precautions, such as social distancing, sanitizing procedures and use of PPE when required to support students
* School closures have had a significant impact on the mental health and well being of students with disabilities and teachers, ECEs, staff will require training on child development and trauma informed practice to assist them in supporting students in transitioning back to school or continuation of virtual education.
* The expectation on parent/guardians to support students with learning at home were significant and parents need supports and training in virtual learning software and how they can effectively support their childs learning. Recommendations Government

76) That Ministry of Education should model leadership to School Boards and provide accessible virtual learning webinars, templates for learning, etc. to be utilized in training administrators and teachers.
77) The Ministry of Education should direct School Boards to provide all staff training in child development, mental health and wellbeing to support the wellbeing and learning of students with disabilities.
78) The Government should provide direction to School Boards and Public Service agencies to develop a coordinated training delivery model to support parents of students with rehabilitation needs, mental health concerns or who have complex or significant medically needs, with the delivery of virtual care, including privacy protected health platforms such as OTN, ADcare. Recommendations School Boards

79) School Boards should provide focused, practical training for administrators and teachers to support students with disabilities health, wellbeing and learning in a mixed or virtual environment.
80) School Boards should provide administrators training and guidelines on supporting students with disabilities through transitioning and change.
81) School Boards should develop parent training modules and resources to enable parent/guardians to develop the skills and knowledge required to support online and virtual learning at home for students with disabilities.
82) School Boards should provide training for teachers and staff on specific tips and solutions, successful and evidence based promising practices by disability to support teachers and students with disabilities learning. These should be made available as soon as possible or at the latest, during the first days of PD before school instruction begins.

Transportation
School Bus operation and delivery of bus services is regulated and governed both federally and provincially. Transport Canada has consulted with the Public Health Agency of Canada to provide guidelines around bus operations during the pandemic. The National Association for Pupil Transportation (NAPT) has also provided general guidelines for the provision of student (pupil) transportation services.
The Ministry of Educations Return to School Framework directs School Boards to follow these federal guidelines.
To accommodate Federal Transportation and Public health guideline that require social and physical distancing, School Boards will have to revise transportation services delivery that will impact bus routes, increase the number of buses and drivers required, increase ridership time, etc. to mitigate risks to students with disabilities while transporting to and from school. Barriers

Lack of or reduced public transportation available for students with disabilities, particularly for secondary students who take public transit. Municipal governments eliminated routes or reduced schedules during COVID-19. Municipalities have not made public transportation plans for when students return to school.
As School Boards and Consortiums plan transportation services to meet the Transport Canada guidelines, current challenges of inadequate buses, shortage of drivers and increasing fuel costs will be a barrier to boards.
Changes to routine can have a significant impact to a student with disabilities mental health, success for the start of school day and learning. Predictable changes to transportation for students with disabilities can include, increased ridership time, bus route, bus type (72-passenger, small bus), supports or accommodations required for a successful ride, etc. while maintaining safety and mitigating risks for infection.
Many School Boards currently overspend the transportation grant, while still achieving a high efficiency rating from the Ministry of Education. The additional requirements defined under the Transport Canada Guidelines will increase cost pressures to provide transportation services to students with disabilities while maintaining safety and mitigating risk of infection.
As students with disabilities require may require specific transportation accommodations such as a safety harness, seat belt, wheelchair accessible which cannot be accommodated in all vehicle types.

Recommendations School Boards

83) As many School Boards overspend its transportation grant while maintaining a high efficiency rating, the Ministry of Education should provide school boards with additional COVID-19 specific funding to follow the guidelines as provided by Transport Canada around: o Measures to mitigate risk of exposure
o Procedures to be taken before a trip, during a trip and at the end of the trip o PPE guidelines
o Physical Distancing
o Shield and Enclosure system guidelines (if bus operators choose to do so)
84) School Boards should review transportation accommodations and requirements, in consultation with parents and student, IEPs of students with disabilities who require transportation services to identify any change/modifications to accommodations required. The students IEP shall be modified to reflect additional requirements to transport the student safely on the bus. The review for medically fragile students should include professionals, such as nurses, occupational therapists, as well as parents. All transportation requirements shall be relayed to the Bus Consortia and administrator of the school for implementation.
85) School Boards must create/revise a protocol for the safe gathering of all students and parent/guardians at bus stops and safety on the bus. It is important that student with disabilities be included and familiarized with these protocols with their peers.
86) School Boards and Bus Consortia should provide bus drivers with training on new health and safety protocols for students with disabilities on a regular bus, small bus and wheelchair accessible bus.
87) Bus Consortia should minimize changes to routes, vehicle type, and schedules for students with disabilities while developing changes to routes, to limit increased anxiety or behaviours as a result of the changes. When changes are considered, parents and student should be consulted about changes.
88) School Boards and Bus Consortia should review procedures and protocols for persons responsible for putting a student with disabilitys harness on/off or supporting a student on the school bus to mitigate health risks for the student, bus driver and support person.
89) School Boards and Bus Consortia should revise/develop, implement and disseminate bus safety protocol Information for parents needs to help mitigate health and safety risks and assuage parents fears. This includes protocols around harnesses. All communications should be clear and made readily available on the Board and Bus Consortia website in an accessible digital format.
90) Students with disabilities should be included in any training that is provide for all students on enhanced safety rules on the bus.
91) As students with disabilities are statistically proven to be at a higher risk of infection, School Boards and Bus Consortia should implement enhanced student bus ridership attendance procedures to aid in tracing of COVID-19 and mitigating health risks.
92) Traffic volume, student and road safety is always a concern around schools. It is expected for vehicle traffic to increase when school returns, as parent/caregiver or a secondary student chooses to drive to school. School Boards should work collaboratively with Municipalities to develop safe arrival and departure awareness campaigns for students, parents/caregivers and buses. These campaigns could include guidelines for kiss & ride, audio described (DV) and closed captioned (CC) virtual or diagrams of vehicle traffic flows for entering and exiting school property from the street, identifying school bus only access areas, promote other methods of transportation, etc.

Conclusion
The Planning for Emergencies are please to provide its draft recommendations related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Working Group will continue to review resources and information on barriers and issues arising from COVID-19 and as students return to school. It will start work on its mandate to develop an emergency plan framework focused on students with disabilities (that covers the phases of preparing, planning, response and recovery) for a systematic response to an emergency.
Thank you to all the members of the Planning for Emergencies Working Group for their dedication in developing this draft set of recommendations. Working Group members are: * Donna Edwards (Chair Working Group)
* Stephan Andrews
* David Lepofsky
* Dr. Ashleigh Malloy
* Alison Morse
* Rana Nasrazadani
* Ben Smith
* Angelo Tocco
* Dr. Lindy Zaretsky
* Lynn Ziraldo (Chair K-12 SDC)

Glossary
Accessibility: a general term for the degree of ease that something (e.g., device, service, physical environment and information) can be accessed, used and enjoyedby persons with disabilities. The term implies conscious planning, design and/or effortto make sure something is barrier-free to persons with disabilities. Accessibility also benefits the general population, by making things more usable and practical for everyone, including older people and families with small children.
Accessible: does not have obstacles for people with disabilities something that can be easily reached or obtained; facility that can be easily entered; information that is easy to access.
Accessible digital format: Information that is provided in digital form that is accessible such as HTML and MS Word.
Synchronous learning: is the kind of learning that happens in real time. This means that you, your classmates, and your instructor interact in a specific virtual place, through a specific online medium, at a specific time. In other words, its not exactly anywhere, anyhow, anytime. Methods of synchronous online learning include video conferencing, teleconferencing, live chatting, and live-streaming lectures.

Asynchronous learning: happens on your schedule. While your course of study, instructor or degree program will provide materials for reading, lectures for viewing, assignments for completing, and exams for evaluation, you have the ability to access and satisfy these requirements within a flexible time frame. Methods of asynchronous online learning include self-guided lesson modules, streaming video content, virtual libraries, posted lecture notes, and exchanges across discussion boards or social media platforms.

Distance Education Program: Programs to provide courses of study online, through correspondence, or by other means that do not require the physical attendance by the student at a school. (From Bill 197)
Special Education Services – As defined in the Education Act, facilities and resources, including support personnel and equipment, necessary for developing and implementing a special education program.
Virtual learning: is defined as learning that can functionally and effectively occur in the absence of traditional classroom environments (Simonson & Schlosser, 2006).

Virtual education: refers to instruction in a learning environment where teacher and student are separated by time or space, or both, and the teacher provides course content through course management applications, multimedia resources, the Internet, videoconferencing, etc. Students receive the content and communicate with the teacher via the same technologies.

Virtual learning environment: refers to a system that offers educators digitally-based solutions aimed at creating interactive, active learning environments. VLEs can help educators create, store and disseminate content, plan courses and lessons and foster communication between student and educator. Virtual learning environments are often part of an education institutions wider learning management system (LMS).

Virtual instruction: is a method of teaching that is taught either entirely online or when elements of face-to-face courses are taught online through learning management systems and other educational tools and platforms. Virtual instruction also includes digitally transmitting course materials to student. Resources
Mental Health
? School Mental Health https://smho-smso.ca/ – a variety of resources for students, parents, educators
? Mental Health and Teachers https://www.tes.com/news/will-fear-coronavirus-affect-your-teaching?utm_campaign=73103_20200608%20Editorial%20Daily%20Register&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Dot_Digital&utm_content=73103_20200608%20Editorial%20Daily%20Register&dm_i=5NNY,1KEN,M10WD,5U5E,1 ? People for Education Educational reading in a Pandemic – https://peopleforeducation.ca/our-work/education-reading-in-a-pandemic/

Public Health Guidance and Safety

? Alberta Public Health guidance for schools –
https://www.alberta.ca/release.cfm?xID=72576418BE34F-D428-6986-0F85E17B91BA2A40#toc-0
? Centre for Disease Control – Case Investigation and Contact Tracing : Part of a Multipronged Approach to Fight the COVID-19 Pandemic –https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/php/principles-contact-tracing.html
? Canada Public Health -Updated: Public health management of cases and contacts associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) = https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/health-professionals/interim-guidance-cases-contacts.html#co ? UNICEF- a framework to reopening schools –
https://www.unicef.org/documents/framework-reopening-schools ? Government of Canada resources for parents –
https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus-disease-covid-19/resources-parents-children.html ? SickKids Recommendations for School Reopenings –
https://www.sickkids.ca/PDFs/About-SickKids/81407-COVID19-Recommendations-for-School-Reopening-SickKids.pdf ? Federal Guidance for School Bus Operations during the COVID-19 Pandemic –
https://www2.tc.gc.ca/en/services/road/federal-guidance-school-bus-operations-during-covid-19-pandemic.html).
? National Association for Pupil Transportation (NAPT) Guidelines – https://www.napt.org/covid ? Considerations for Wearing Cloth Face Coverings, Centre for Disease Control –
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/cloth-face-cover-guidance.html#feasibility-adaptations

Tools/Best Practices

? York Catholic District School Board https://sites.google.com/ycdsb.ca/ycdsb-ssd-distance-learning/home – learning from home resource
? Durham District School Board https://www.ddsb.ca/en/programs-and-learning/distance-learning.aspx distance learning resources
? Durham District School Board https://www.ddsb.ca/en/programs-and-learning/resources/Documents/Distance-Learning/IEPs-Documenting-Accommodation-and-Programming-During-Distance-Learning-05-2020.pdf IEPs documenting accommodations and programing during distance learning ? Durham District School Board –
https://www.ddsb.ca/en/programs-and-learning/resources/Documents/Distance-Learning/Distance-Learning–Identification-Placement-and-Review-Committee-IPRC-Process.pdf IPRC process during distance learning ? Thames Valley District School Board –
https://www.tvdsb.ca/en/our-board/learning-at-a-distance.aspx distance learning resources and more ? Ottawa-Carleton District School Board –
https://ocdsb.ca/cms/one.aspx?portalId=55478&pageId=32163119 learning at home resources
? York Region District School Board has a variety of learning resources, resources for parents etc. –
http://www.yrdsb.ca/schools/Repository/NewsEvents/Pages/BoardNews/Coronavirus.aspx
? Toronto District School Board https://sites.google.com/tcdsb.ca/tcdsb-parents-at/home – a guide to assistive technology for parents
? University of Toronto Accessibility formats and communication supports http://aoda.hrandequity.utoronto.ca/communications/ ? Best Practices for Collecting Data on Disabilities, Education Links – https://www.edu-links.org/learning/best-practices-collecting-data-disabilities
? Accessibility for Ontario Disabilities Act, Integrated Guide, Section 12: Accessible Formats and Communication Supports –
https://www.aoda.ca/a-guide-to-the-integrated-accessibility-standards-regulation/#sect12 ? Ontario Human Rights Code Policies and Guidelines on Duty to Accommodate –
http://www3.ohrc.on.ca/sites/default/files/policy%20and%20guidelines%20on%20disability%20and%20the%20duty%20to%20accommodate.pdf
? Preparing K-12 School Administrators for a Safe Return to School in Fall 2020, Centre for Disease Control –
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/prepare-safe-return.html

Stakeholder Reports and Information

? OHRC Letter to the Minister of Education about convening a return-to-school partnership table –
http://www.ohrc.on.ca/en/news_centre/letter-minister-education-about-convening-return-school-partnership-table
? OHC Letter to the Minister of Education, school leaders on respecting the rights of students with disabilities –
http://www.ohrc.on.ca/en/news_centre/letter-minister-education-school-leaders-respecting-rights-students-disabilities
? OHRC Letter to Ministers re: accessible education for students with disabilities –
http://www.ohrc.on.ca/en/letter-ministers-re-accessible-education-students-disabilities
? Report of The Third Review Of The Accessibility For Ontarians With Disabilities Act, 2005 By The Honourable David C. Onley – https://files.ontario.ca/seniors-accessibility-third-review-of-aoda-en-2019.pdf
? AFT, American Federation of Teachers https://www.aft.org/sites/default/files/guide_reopen-america-schools.pdf – a guide to safely open schools
? AODA Alliance Final Brief to Ontario Government on Urgent needs of K-12 Students with Disabilities during COVID-19 Crisis –
https://www.aodaalliance.org/whats-new/download-in-ms-word-format-the-aoda-alliances-june-18-2020-finalized-brief-to-the-ontario-government-on-what-needs-to-be-done-to-meet-the-needs-of-students-with-disabilities-during-the-trans/
? AODA Alliance – New Report Reveals that Majority of Ontarios School Boards, Each School Principal can Exclude a Student From School Real Risk of a Rash of Exclusion of Some Students with Disabilities When Schools Re-Open –
https://www.aodaalliance.org/whats-new/new-report-reveals-that-at-majority-of-ontarios-school-boards-each-school-principal-is-a-law-unto-themselves-with-arbitrary-power-to-exclude-a-student-from-school-real-risk-of-a-rash-of-exclusio/
? Wisconsin DPI releases guidelines for reopening schools this fall: Proactive approach –
https://fox6now.com/2020/06/22/wisconsin-department-of-public-instruction-releases-guidelines-for-reopening-schools-this-fall/
? ASCD http://www.ascd.org/publications/newsletters/education-update/may20/vol62/num05/7-Ways-Educators-Can-Help-Students-Cope-in-a-Pandemic.aspx
? Easter Seals https://education.easterseals.org/supporting-learning-at-home-through-the-covid-19-crisis/ – online learning resources ? [email protected] resources for parents – https://www.ldathome.ca/
? [email protected] resources for teachers – https://www.ldatschool.ca/ ? People for Education Effective e-learning need structures and supports –
https://peopleforeducation.ca/our-work/technology-in-schools-a-tool-and-a-strategy/ ? Accessibility Digital Office Project – https://adod.idrc.ocadu.ca/ ? People for Education Educational reading in a Pandemic – https://peopleforeducation.ca/our-work/education-reading-in-a-pandemic

Additional Reading

? How brain research help retool our school schedule for remote learning –
https://www.edsurge.com/news/2020-06-10-how-brain-research-helped-retool-our-school-schedule-for-remote-learning
? Ontario Developmental Services https://www.dsontario.ca/resources/webcasts-podcasts – podcast to Passport Funding
? Survey Place resources https://www.surreyplace.ca/resources-publications/coronavirus-updates-resources/#parents ? Statistics Canada Survey parenting during pandemic –
https://surveys-enquetes.statcan.gc.ca/form-formulaire/q/en/eqgs4b1d8328edfa4922aa915b5436328916/p0 ? Globe & Mail -Children being rendered invisible https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-children-being-rendered-invisible-by-province-former-ontario-child/
? CTV News – Parents should ‘respect custody arrangements’ during COVID-19 pandemic –
https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/parents-should-respect-custody-arrangements-during-covid-19-pandemic-1.4874720?cache=wcoseppn%3FautoPlay%3Dtrue%3FclipId%3D89680
? Top 10 – A New New Deal For Education: Top 10 Policy Moves For States In The COVID 2.0 Era –
https://www.forbes.com/sites/lindadarlinghammond/2020/05/19/a-new-new-deal-for-education-top-10-policy-moves-for-states-in-the-covid-20-era/#203440f16266
? UNESCO MGIEP Essential SEL Resources: COVID-19 – https://mgiep.unesco.org/covid
? Inter-agency Network for Education in Emergencies https://inee.org/resources/inee-minimum-standards Minimum Standards Handbook: Preparedness, Emergency, Recovery
? George Lucas Foundation https://www.edutopia.org/article/schools-are-opening-worldwide-providing-model-us?utm_source=Edutopia+Newsletter&utm_campaign=9f50493399-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_052720_enews_schoolsare&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f72e8cc8c4-9f50493399-78670447 article on school opening around the world ? Teacher Magazine- How teachers can help students transition back to school –
https://www.teachermagazine.com.au/articles/covid-19-how-teachers-can-help-students-transition-back-to-school ? Tes What 1 week after returning to school looks like –
https://www.tes.com/news/coronavirus-reopening-schools-one-week-back-what-has-return-school-been ? How brain research help retool our school schedule for remote learning –
https://www.edsurge.com/news/2020-06-10-how-brain-research-helped-retool-our-school-schedule-for-remote-learning




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B.C. students in need of additional support have fallen behind amid COVID-19 pandemic: report


B.C. children and youth with disabilities have seen their access to education diminish due to the ongoing novel coronavirus pandemic, according to a new survey.

This comes as the province prepares to announce a full return to school for most students on Wednesday.

“Two years into tracking exclusion and a global pandemic later, we are seeing this tsunami of inequity and denied access to education. All I can think is, what are the long-term effects of ongoing exclusion going to be on children like ours? Where is the accountability?” said the report’s co-author Jenn Newby.

In April, only 20 per cent of survey respondents said they were offered educational assistant support for their child. Several also noted their child’s educational assistant had already been offered alternative work by their school districts.

Read more:
Over a third of B.C. teachers ‘unsure’ about returning to classroom in September

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School districts also were inconsistent in informing the families of essential workers and vulnerable kids that the schools were still open five days a week for them, according to the report.

When asked about things such as child care, education, food, mental health, respite, and technology, nearly a third of respondents said districts had provided no support.

In June, when schools reopened on a voluntary basis for all students, only 11.9 per cent of respondents’ children were attending full time.

“It is tragic that so many of our children were left behind by their schools during the COVID-19 crisis,” said Nicole Kaler of BCEdAccess, the group that released the report.

“These exclusions have increased the traumatic impact of the pandemic. There is some time to plan and we want school districts to learn from these documented failures and make changes in September.”






B.C. teachers unsure about return to classroom in September


B.C. teachers unsure about return to classroom in September

Education Minister Rob Fleming says the working group tasked with dealing with the return of school has representation focused on vulnerable learners.

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The province helped put together programs with the school districts after the pandemic to distribute 75,000 meals a week to families. The province also worked to loan out 25,000 devices, including computers, to families without home access to the internet or virtual learning.

The province is focusing on ensuring students can catch up as quickly as possible.

“Many may have fallen behind and may need remedial supports as they progress into the next grade level,” Fleming said.

“We are very conscious this pandemic has affected people in different ways.”



© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.





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New Report Reveals that At Majority of Ontarios School Boards, Each School Principal Is a Law Unto Themselves, With Arbitrary Power to Exclude a Student From School ? Real Risk of a Rash of Exclusion of Some Students with Disabilities When Schools Re-Open


ACCESSIBILITY FOR ONTARIANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT ALLIANCE
NEWS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 23, 2020 Toronto: Parents of a third of a million Ontario K-12 students with disabilities have much to fear when schools re-open. A ground-breaking report by the non-partisan AODA Alliance (unveiled today, summary below) shows that for much of Ontario, each school principal is a law unto themselves, armed with a sweeping, arbitrary power to refuse to allow a student to come to school. If schools re-open this fall, there is a real risk of a rash of principals excluding some students with disabilities from school, because well-intentioned, overburdened principals wont know how to accommodate them during COVID-19.

The Education Act gives each school principal the drastic power to refuse to admit to school any person whose presence in the school or classroom would in the principals judgment be detrimental to the physical or mental well-being of the pupils”. A survey of Ontarios 72 school boards, unveiled today, shows that a majority of school boards have no policy reining in their principals sweeping power. Ontarios Ministry of Education gives principals precious little direction. Principals need not keep track of how many students they exclude, or for how long, or for what reason, nor need they report this information to anyone. School Boards are left largely free to do as little as they wish to monitor for and prevent abuse of this power.

This is especially worrisome for students with disabilities. Disproportionately, its students with disabilities who are at risk of being excluded from school.

Todays report details how the most vulnerable students can unjustifiably be treated very differently from one part of Ontario to the next. Of Ontarios 72 School Boards, only 33 Boards have been found to have any policy on this. Only 36 School Boards even responded to the AODA Alliance survey. Only 11 Boards gave the AODA Alliance a policy. A web search revealed that another 22 Boards have a policy on this.

As for the minority of 33 boards that have any policy on point, this report documented wild and arbitrary differences from Board to Board. Some Board policies have commendable and helpful ingredients that all boards should have. Some Board policies contain unfair and inappropriate ingredients that should be forbidden. For example, no Board should impose on a student or their family an arbitrary time limit for presenting an appeal from their exclusion to school.

Every student facing the trauma of an exclusion from school deserves full and equally fair procedures and safeguards, said AODA Alliance Chair David Lepofsky. The current arbitrary pattern of patchwork injustice cries out for new leadership now by the Ford Government.

COVID-19 escalates this issues urgency. The Ministry of Education should head off a rash of new exclusions from school this fall before it happens, by immediately directing School Boards to implement common sense restrictions on a principal, outlined in the report, on when and how a principal may exclude a student from school.

Contact: AODA Alliance Chair David Lepofsky, [email protected] Twitter: @aodaalliance

Download the entire AODA Alliance report on Refusals to Admit A Student to School by visiting https://www.aodaalliance.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/july-23-2020-AODA-Alliance-finalized-refusals-to-admit-brief.docx

The AODA Alliances COVID-19 web page details its efforts to ensure that the urgent needs of people with disabilities are met during the COVID-19 crisis.
The AODA Alliance’s Education web page details its ongoing efforts over the past decade to tear down the many barriers impeding students with disabilities in Ontarios education system.

Introduction and Summary of the AODA Alliances Report on the Power of Ontario School Principals to Refuse to Admit a Student to School

I. Introduction and Summary
(a) Whats the Problem?
For years, Ontarios Education Act has given every Ontario school principal the drastic power to refuse to admit to school any person whose presence in the school or classroom would in the principals judgment be detrimental to the physical or mental well-being of the pupils”. A student can be excluded from school for part or all of the school day. This report uses the terms refusal to admit and exclusion from school or simply exclusion to mean the same thing.

When a principal refuses to admit a student to school, that violates that students right to go to school to get an education. Under the Education Act as interpreted or applied by the Ontario Government and school boards, a student can be excluded from school for days, weeks or even months.

Ontarios Ministry of Education has given School Boards and principals very little direction on how this sweeping power may be used. School Boards are therefore left largely free to do as much or as little as they wish to ensure that this power is not abused by an individual school principal.

A School Board can develop a policy on how a principal can use the power to refuse to admit a student to school; however, a School Board does not have to do so. If it does adopt a policy, it does not have to be a good policy. (b) Taking Stock The AODA Alliance Surveys Ontario School Boards
The AODA Alliance therefore conducted a survey of Ontarios major School Boards to find out what their policies and practices are regarding the exclusion of students from school. The non-partisan grassroots AODA Alliance advocates for accessibility for people with disabilities, including for students with disabilities. See its websites Education page.

This report makes public the results of the AODA Alliance’s survey and investigation. It reveals an arbitrary patchwork of different policies around Ontario, unjustifiably treating the most vulnerable students differently from one part of Ontario to the next. There is a pressing need for the Ontario Government to step into the gap, to protect students, and especially students with disabilities.
In an error which the AODA Alliance regrets, the survey was inadvertently not earlier sent to one board, the Dufferin Peel Catholic District School Board, before this report was written. It has just done so, and will make public an addendum to this report if a response is received that alters the results expressed in this report. This error does not diminish this reports findings or recommendations.

School Boards were asked (i) if it has a policy on when-and-how its school principals can refuse to admit a student to school, (ii) whether the Board tracks its principals use of this power, and (iii) how many students have been excluded from school. The AODA Alliance sent its survey to School Boards twice, once in 2019, and once in 2020. The Council of Directors of Education retained private legal counsel to get legal advice before responding to this survey.
(c) The Survey Revealed an Arbitrary Patchwork of Wildly Varying Local Requirements
Of Ontarios 72 School Boards, only 33 Boards have been found to have a written policy or procedure on refusals to admit a student to school. Only 36 School Boards responded to the AODA Alliances survey. Of those, only 11 Boards gave the AODA Alliance their policy or procedure on refusals to admit.

Six School Boards told the AODA Alliance that they have no policy on refusals to admit. An extensive web search by the AODA Alliance revealed that another 22 School Boards have a written policy or procedure on this topic. In a number of cases, these were not easy to find. Taken together, a large number of Ontario School Boards revealed a troubling lack of openness and accountability on this subject.

This reports analysis of the 33 policies or procedures on refusals to admit, as obtained by the AODA Alliance, revealed that there are wild variations between the written policies of School Boards across Ontario on excluding a student from school. Some are very short and say very little. Others are far more extensive and detailed.

As for safeguards for vulnerable students and their parents in the face of an exclusion from school, there are arbitrary and unjustified differences from Board to Board. Some Board policies have commendable and helpful ingredients that should be required of all School Boards. Some Board policies contain unfair and inappropriate ingredients that should be forbidden. For example, no Board should use a refusal to admit to facilitate a police investigation, or set an arbitrary time limit in advance for an appeal hearing from a refusal to admit, or give a student or their family an arbitrary time limit for presenting such an appeal.

There is no justification for such wild variations from Board to Board, from no policy, to policies that say very little, to substantially better policies. Every student facing an exclusion from school deserves fair procedures and effective safeguards. Every School Board should meet basic requirements of transparency and accountability in their use of this drastic power. No compelling policy objective is served by leaving each School Board to reinvent the wheel here. (d) The Urgently Needed Solution: Action Now by the Ontario Government
This situation cries out for leadership on this issue by Ontarios Ministry of Education. The failure of so many School Boards to even have a policy in this area, the unwillingness of so many School Boards to even answer questions about their policy on this issue, and the fact that policies are so hard to find on line combine to create a disturbing picture. For too much of Ontario, well-intentioned school principals are left to be a law unto themselves. The AODA Alliance expects that these hard-working and dedicated principals neither asked for this nor would like this situation to remain as is.

This issue has serious implications for students with disabilities. Refusals to admit a student to school disproportionately burden some students with disabilities.

The COVID-19 crisis escalates the urgency of this issue. When schools re-open this fall, there is a real risk that there could be a rash of more refusals to admit some students with disabilities to school. This threatens to be the way some overwhelmed and overburdened principals will cope with the stressful uncertainties surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Ministry of Education should head off this problem before it happens, by immediately directing School Boards to implement some basic and overdue requirements for refusals to admit a student to school. The Ministry should then develop a comprehensive and broader set of mandatory requirements for all School Boards when exercising the power to refuse to admit a student to school.

Examples of helpful requirements that the Ministry of Education should require, and that this report documents as now in place in one or more School Boards include the following:
1. Refusals to admit should be recognized as an infringement of the students right to go to school to get an education, and as raising potential human rights issues, especially for students with disabilities. The Ontario Human Rights Code has primacy over the Education Act and the power to refuse to admit a student to school.
2. A refusal to admit should only be imposed for a proper safety purpose. A student cannot be refused admission to school for purposes of discipline.
3. Maximum time limits should be set for a refusal to admit, with a process for considering how to extend it if necessary and justified.
4. A refusal to admit a student to school should only be permitted in very rare, extreme cases, as a last resort, after considering or trying all less intrusive alternatives. A principal should be required to take a step-by-step tiered approach to deciding whether to refuse to admit a student to school, first exhausting all less restrictive alternatives, and first ensuring that the students disability-related needs have been accommodated as required under the Ontario Human Rights Code.
5. It should not be left to an individual principal to unilaterally decide on their own to refuse to admit a student to school. Prior approval of a higher authority with the School Board should be required, supported by sufficient documentation of the deliberations.
6. A principal should be required to work with a student and their family on issues well before it degenerates to the point of considering a refusal to admit. The School Board should be required to have a mandatory meeting with the family before a refusal to admit is imposed.
7. A principal should be required to immediately send a letter to the parents of a student whom they are refusing to admit to school, setting out the facts and specifics that are the reasons for the exclusion from school. A senior Board supervisor that approved the decision should be required to co-sign the letter. The letter should also be signed by the Director of Education if the student is to be excluded from all schools in the Board.
8. A School Board that excludes a student from school should be required to put in place a plan for delivering an effective educational program to that student while excluded from school, including the option of face-to-face engagement with a teacher off of school property. This plan should be monitored to ensure it is sufficient.
9. If a student is excluded from school, the School Board should be under a strong duty to work with the student and family to get them back to school as soon as possible.
10. A School Board that excludes a student from school should be required to hold a re-entry meeting with the student and family to transition to the return to school.
11. Any appeals to the Board of Trustees for the School Board from a refusal to admit should assure fair procedures to the student and their family. An excluded student should at least have all the safeguards in the appeal process as does a student who is subjected to discipline.
12. The appeal should be heard by the entire Board of Trustees, and not just a sub-committee of some trustees. An appeal hearing should be held and decided quickly, since the student is languishing at home.
13. A Board of Trustees, hearing an appeal from a refusal to admit, should consider whether the School Board has justified the students initial exclusion from school and its continuation. The burden should be on the School Board to justify the exclusion from school, and not on the student trying to go back to school. At an appeal hearing, the principal should first present why the exclusion from school is justified and should continue, before the student or parents are asked to show why the student should be allowed to return to school.
14. When an appeal is launched, the School Board should be required to first try to resolve the issue short of a full appeal hearing.
15. A students record of a refusal to admit to school should not stain the students official school record.
16. If a School Board directs that a student can only come to school for part of the school day), the same safeguards for the student should be required as for a student who is excluded for the entire day. 17. Any policy in this area should be periodically reviewed and updated.




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New Report Reveals that At Majority of Ontario’s School Boards, Each School Principal Is a Law Unto Themselves, With Arbitrary Power to Exclude a Student From School – Real Risk of a Rash of Exclusion of Some Students with Disabilities When Schools Re-Open


ACCESSIBILITY FOR ONTARIANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT ALLIANCE

NEWS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

New Report Reveals that At Majority of Ontario’s School Boards, Each School Principal Is a Law Unto Themselves, With Arbitrary Power to Exclude a Student From School – Real Risk of a Rash of Exclusion of Some Students with Disabilities When Schools Re-Open

July 23, 2020 Toronto: Parents of a third of a million Ontario K-12 students with disabilities have much to fear when schools re-open. A ground-breaking report by the non-partisan AODA Alliance (unveiled today, summary below) shows that for much of Ontario, each school principal is a law unto themselves, armed with a sweeping, arbitrary power to refuse to allow a student to come to school. If schools re-open this fall, there is a real risk of a rash of principals excluding some students with disabilities from school, because well-intentioned, overburdened principals won’t know how to accommodate them during COVID-19.

The Education Act gives each school principal the drastic power to refuse to admit to school any “person whose presence in the school or classroom would in the principal’s judgment be detrimental to the physical or mental well-being of the pupils…”. A survey of Ontario’s 72 school boards, unveiled today, shows that a majority of school boards have no policy reining in their principals’ sweeping power. Ontario’s Ministry of Education gives principals precious little direction. Principals need not keep track of how many students they exclude, or for how long, or for what reason, nor need they report this information to anyone. School Boards are left largely free to do as little as they wish to monitor for and prevent abuse of this power.

This is especially worrisome for students with disabilities. Disproportionately, it’s students with disabilities who are at risk of being excluded from school.

Today’s report details how the most vulnerable students can unjustifiably be treated very differently from one part of Ontario to the next. Of Ontario’s 72 School Boards, only 33 Boards have been found to have any policy on this. Only 36 School Boards even responded to the AODA Alliance survey. Only 11 Boards gave the AODA Alliance a policy. A web search revealed that another 22 Boards have a policy on this.

As for the minority of 33 boards that have any policy on point, this report documented wild and arbitrary differences from Board to Board. Some Board policies have commendable and helpful ingredients that all boards should have. Some Board policies contain unfair and inappropriate ingredients that should be forbidden. For example, no Board should impose on a student or their family an arbitrary time limit for presenting an appeal from their exclusion to school.

“Every student facing the trauma of an exclusion from school deserves full and equally fair procedures and safeguards,” said AODA Alliance Chair David Lepofsky. “The current arbitrary pattern of patchwork injustice cries out for new leadership now by the Ford Government.”

COVID-19 escalates this issue’s urgency. The Ministry of Education should head off a rash of new exclusions from school this fall before it happens, by immediately directing School Boards to implement common sense restrictions on a principal, outlined in the report, on when and how a principal may exclude a student from school.

Contact: AODA Alliance Chair David Lepofsky, [email protected] Twitter: @aodaalliance

Download the entire AODA Alliance report on Refusals to Admit A Student to School by visiting https://www.aodaalliance.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/july-23-2020-AODA-Alliance-finalized-refusals-to-admit-brief.docx

The AODA Alliance’s COVID-19 web page details its efforts to ensure that the urgent needs of people with disabilities are met during the COVID-19 crisis.

The AODA Alliance‘s Education web page details its ongoing efforts over the past decade to tear down the many barriers impeding students with disabilities in Ontario’s education system.

Introduction and Summary of the AODA Alliance’s Report on the Power of Ontario School Principals to Refuse to Admit a Student to School

I. Introduction and Summary

(a) What’s the Problem?

For years, Ontario’s Education Act has given every Ontario school principal the drastic power to refuse to admit to school any “person whose presence in the school or classroom would in the principal’s judgment be detrimental to the physical or mental well-being of the pupils…”. A student can be excluded from school for part or all of the school day. This report uses the terms “refusal to admit” and “exclusion from school” or simply “exclusion” to mean the same thing.

When a principal refuses to admit a student to school, that violates that student’s right to go to school to get an education. Under the Education Act as interpreted or applied by the Ontario Government and school boards, a student can be excluded from school for days, weeks or even months.

Ontario’s Ministry of Education has given School Boards and principals very little direction on how this sweeping power may be used. School Boards are therefore left largely free to do as much or as little as they wish to ensure that this power is not abused by an individual school principal.

A School Board can develop a policy on how a principal can use the power to refuse to admit a student to school; however, a School Board does not have to do so. If it does adopt a policy, it does not have to be a good policy.

(b) Taking Stock – The AODA Alliance Surveys Ontario School Boards

The AODA Alliance therefore conducted a survey of Ontario’s major School Boards to find out what their policies and practices are regarding the exclusion of students from school. The non-partisan grassroots AODA Alliance advocates for accessibility for people with disabilities, including for students with disabilities. See its website’s Education page.

This report makes public the results of the AODA Alliance‘s survey and investigation. It reveals an arbitrary patchwork of different policies around Ontario, unjustifiably treating the most vulnerable students differently from one part of Ontario to the next. There is a pressing need for the Ontario Government to step into the gap, to protect students, and especially students with disabilities.

In an error which the AODA Alliance regrets, the survey was inadvertently not earlier sent to one board, the Dufferin Peel Catholic District School Board, before this report was written. It has just done so, and will make public an addendum to this report if a response is received that alters the results expressed in this report. This error does not diminish this report’s findings or recommendations.

School Boards were asked (i) if it has a policy on when-and-how its school principals can refuse to admit a student to school, (ii) whether the Board tracks its principal’s use of this power, and (iii) how many students have been excluded from school. The AODA Alliance sent its survey to School Boards twice, once in 2019, and once in 2020. The Council of Directors of Education retained private legal counsel to get legal advice before responding to this survey.

(c) The Survey Revealed an Arbitrary Patchwork of Wildly Varying Local Requirements

Of Ontario’s 72 School Boards, only 33 Boards have been found to have a written policy or procedure on refusals to admit a student to school. Only 36 School Boards responded to the AODA Alliance’s survey. Of those, only 11 Boards gave the AODA Alliance their policy or procedure on refusals to admit.

Six School Boards told the AODA Alliance that they have no policy on refusals to admit. An extensive web search by the AODA Alliance revealed that another 22 School Boards have a written policy or procedure on this topic. In a number of cases, these were not easy to find. Taken together, a large number of Ontario School Boards revealed a troubling lack of openness and accountability on this subject.

This report’s analysis of the 33 policies or procedures on refusals to admit, as obtained by the AODA Alliance, revealed that there are wild variations between the written policies of School Boards across Ontario on excluding a student from school. Some are very short and say very little. Others are far more extensive and detailed.

As for safeguards for vulnerable students and their parents in the face of an exclusion from school, there are arbitrary and unjustified differences from Board to Board. Some Board policies have commendable and helpful ingredients that should be required of all School Boards. Some Board policies contain unfair and inappropriate ingredients that should be forbidden. For example, no Board should use a refusal to admit to facilitate a police investigation, or set an arbitrary time limit in advance for an appeal hearing from a refusal to admit, or give a student or their family an arbitrary time limit for presenting such an appeal.

There is no justification for such wild variations from Board to Board, from no policy, to policies that say very little, to substantially better policies. Every student facing an exclusion from school deserves fair procedures and effective safeguards. Every School Board should meet basic requirements of transparency and accountability in their use of this drastic power. No compelling policy objective is served by leaving each School Board to reinvent the wheel here.

(d) The Urgently Needed Solution: Action Now by the Ontario Government

This situation cries out for leadership on this issue by Ontario’s Ministry of Education. The failure of so many School Boards to even have a policy in this area, the unwillingness of so many School Boards to even answer questions about their policy on this issue, and the fact that policies are so hard to find on line combine to create a disturbing picture. For too much of Ontario, well-intentioned school principals are left to be a law unto themselves. The AODA Alliance expects that these hard-working and dedicated principals neither asked for this nor would like this situation to remain as is.

This issue has serious implications for students with disabilities. Refusals to admit a student to school disproportionately burden some students with disabilities.

The COVID-19 crisis escalates the urgency of this issue. When schools re-open this fall, there is a real risk that there could be a rash of more refusals to admit some students with disabilities to school. This threatens to be the way some overwhelmed and overburdened principals will cope with the stressful uncertainties surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Ministry of Education should head off this problem before it happens, by immediately directing School Boards to implement some basic and overdue requirements for refusals to admit a student to school. The Ministry should then develop a comprehensive and broader set of mandatory requirements for all School Boards when exercising the power to refuse to admit a student to school.

Examples of helpful requirements that the Ministry of Education should require, and that this report documents as now in place in one or more School Boards include the following:

  1. Refusals to admit should be recognized as an infringement of the student’s right to go to school to get an education, and as raising potential human rights issues, especially for students with disabilities. The Ontario Human Rights Code has primacy over the Education Act and the power to refuse to admit a student to school.
  2. A refusal to admit should only be imposed for a proper safety purpose. A student cannot be refused admission to school for purposes of discipline.
  3. Maximum time limits should be set for a refusal to admit, with a process for considering how to extend it if necessary and justified.
  4. A refusal to admit a student to school should only be permitted in very rare, extreme cases, as a last resort, after considering or trying all less intrusive alternatives. A principal should be required to take a step-by-step tiered approach to deciding whether to refuse to admit a student to school, first exhausting all less restrictive alternatives, and first ensuring that the student’s disability-related needs have been accommodated as required under the Ontario Human Rights Code.
  5. It should not be left to an individual principal to unilaterally decide on their own to refuse to admit a student to school. Prior approval of a higher authority with the School Board should be required, supported by sufficient documentation of the deliberations.
  6. A principal should be required to work with a student and their family on issues well before it degenerates to the point of considering a refusal to admit. The School Board should be required to have a mandatory meeting with the family before a refusal to admit is imposed.
  7. A principal should be required to immediately send a letter to the parents of a student whom they are refusing to admit to school, setting out the facts and specifics that are the reasons for the exclusion from school. A senior Board supervisor that approved the decision should be required to co-sign the letter. The letter should also be signed by the Director of Education if the student is to be excluded from all schools in the Board.
  8. A School Board that excludes a student from school should be required to put in place a plan for delivering an effective educational program to that student while excluded from school, including the option of face-to-face engagement with a teacher off of school property. This plan should be monitored to ensure it is sufficient.
  9. If a student is excluded from school, the School Board should be under a strong duty to work with the student and family to get them back to school as soon as possible.
  10. A School Board that excludes a student from school should be required to hold a re-entry meeting with the student and family to transition to the return to school.
  11. Any appeals to the Board of Trustees for the School Board from a refusal to admit should assure fair procedures to the student and their family. An excluded student should at least have all the safeguards in the appeal process as does a student who is subjected to discipline.
  12. The appeal should be heard by the entire Board of Trustees, and not just a sub-committee of some trustees. An appeal hearing should be held and decided quickly, since the student is languishing at home.
  13. A Board of Trustees, hearing an appeal from a refusal to admit, should consider whether the School Board has justified the student’s initial exclusion from school and its continuation. The burden should be on the School Board to justify the exclusion from school, and not on the student trying to go back to school. At an appeal hearing, the principal should first present why the exclusion from school is justified and should continue, before the student or parents are asked to show why the student should be allowed to return to school.
  14. When an appeal is launched, the School Board should be required to first try to resolve the issue short of a full appeal hearing.
  15. A student’s record of a refusal to admit to school should not stain the student’s official school record.
  16. If a School Board directs that a student can only come to school for part of the school day), the same safeguards for the student should be required as for a student who is excluded for the entire day.
  17. Any policy in this area should be periodically reviewed and updated.



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AODA Alliance to Present Tomorrow at Virtual Meeting of Toronto’s Infrastructure Committee to Oppose Allowing Electric Scooters – Submits Detailed Brief that Shows A City Staff Report Proves E-Scooters Endanger Public Safety and Accessibility for People with Disabilities


ACCESSIBILITY FOR ONTARIANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT ALLIANCE

NEWS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

AODA Alliance to Present Tomorrow at Virtual Meeting of Toronto’s Infrastructure Committee to Oppose Allowing Electric Scooters – Submits Detailed Brief that Shows A City Staff Report Proves E-Scooters Endanger Public Safety and Accessibility for People with Disabilities

July 8, 2020

Tomorrow, July 9, 2020 starting at 9:30 am, the City of Toronto’s Infrastructure and Environment Committee will consider if the City should take steps to allow electric scooters (e-scooters) in Toronto. The AODA Alliance is scheduled to make a deputation to the Committee. The Committee meeting will be live-streamed at this link: http://www.youtube.com/torontocitycouncillive

The AODA Alliance has just filed a detailed brief with the City’s Infrastructure and Environment Committee, set out below. It documents in exquisite and exhaustive detail that the City of Toronto’s June 24, 2020 E-Scooters Staff Report amply proves that e-scooters would endanger public safety, lead to injuries and even deaths, create barriers to accessibility for people with disabilities, and force the taxpayer to shoulder new financial burdens. That Staff Report also shows that the supposed social benefits of e-scooters reducing road traffic and pollution are in effect unproven.

“If this gets approved, the taxpayer will get stuck paying the expenses while e-scooter rental companies, who are pushing for their product to get into Toronto, will earn the profits and try to dodge liability for injuries they cause,” said David Lepofsky, Chair of the non-partisan AODA Alliance that has spearheaded advocacy to protect people with disabilities from the dangers that e-scooters pose. “In the middle of this COVID-19 crisis, don’t our City Council members have more important priorities to deal with?”

The only proper conclusion that flows from this City Staff Report is that Toronto should continue to ban e-scooters. Yet the Staff Report instead wrongly proposes that the City of Toronto take steps towards allowing e-scooters. It does not explain why this should be done in the face of the known dangers that the Staff Report shows e-scooters create. We anticipate that the City has been the subject of relentless pressure behind closed doors by corporate lobbyists for the e-scooter rental companies that have been trying to dominate this debate.

The City Staff Report proposes working towards a pilot project in Toronto with e-scooters. The AODA Alliance brief shows that this would be nothing less than a human experiment on the public and would endanger the public, including people with disabilities, without their consent. Human experimentation on non-consenting people is universally condemned.

Contact: AODA Alliance Chair David Lepofsky, [email protected] Twitter: @aodaalliance

For more background, visit the AODA Alliance e-scooters web page.

Don’t Introduce Electric Scooters to Toronto, Since A City Staff Report Shows They Create Dangers to Public Safety and Accessibility for People with Disabilities

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Brief to the City of Toronto Infrastructure and Environment Committee on Proposal to Allow Electric Scooters in Toronto

www.aodaalliance.org [email protected] Twitter: @aodaalliance Facebook: www.facebook.com/aodaalliance/

July 8, 2020

Via email: [email protected]

1. Introduction and Summary

The AODA Alliance calls on the City of Toronto and its Infrastructure Committee to categorically reject the proposal before its July 9, 2020 meeting to take steps towards permitting electric scooters (e-scooters) in Toronto. The City of Toronto and its Infrastructure and Environment Committee should instead focus 100% of their time on the horrific COVID-19 crisis that now engulfs us all. If the Committee feels it must do something short of an outright rejection of e-scooters, it should simply direct City staff to do more research on the harms that e-scooters have caused in places where they are allowed.

The non-partisan AODA Alliance has played a leading role in raising serious disability safety and accessibility concerns with e-scooters. To learn more about the AODA Alliance’s advocacy efforts to protect people with disabilities and others from the dangers that e-scooters pose, visit its e-scooters web page.

The detailed and well-researched June 24, 2020 City of Toronto Staff Report on e-scooters shows that to allow e-scooters in Toronto will endanger public safety, send both e-scooter riders and innocent pedestrians to our hospital emergency rooms, require significant new law enforcement efforts and impose new financial burdens on the taxpayer to cover added costs that e-scooters will trigger. The Staff Report also shows that e-scooters do not bring the great benefits for reduced car traffic and pollution that the corporate lobbyists for e-scooter rental companies claim.

The Staff Report’s detailed analysis supports only one conclusion, namely that e-scooters should not be allowed. Yet despite all e-scooters harms and dubious benefits, the Staff Report proposes instead (without convincing explanation) that the City take steps towards conducting a pilot with e-scooters, deferring a decision to early 2021. This may be because the City has been subjected to relentless pressure from corporate lobbyists for e-scooter rental companies, who are the driving force behind this issue.

In the face of the dangers from e-scooters that the Staff Report reveals, the Report only says that the action it recommends “…reduces the likelihood of e-scooter risks to riders, impacts on people with accessibility needs, community nuisance, and liability to the City…” The Staff Report does not claim that these dangers would be eliminated, or even that they would be substantially reduced. It only says that those risks would be “reduced.” That could be a mere microscopic reduction. Torontonians–especially those with disabilities–deserve better protection.

The City of Toronto should not conduct a “pilot project” with e-scooters to find out how they will work out. The Staff Report shows from the experience with e-scooters elsewhere that the problems that e-scooters present have already been borne out in practice. Moreover, to run a “pilot project” on Torontonians is to conduct a human experiment on them, without their consent, knowing that e-scooters present dangers to public safety and accessibility for people with disabilities. It is wrong to experiment on non-consenting human beings, and especially those who are vulnerable.

It is good that the Staff Report does not recommend actually unleashing e-scooters on Toronto now, with the COVID-19 crisis nearing the end of its fourth month, with no end in sight. With the COVID-19 pandemic working such havoc on our society, Toronto and its residents have far greater priorities to contend with than meeting the needs of those who want to race around this city on e-scooters.

It is unfair for the City of Toronto and its Infrastructure Committee to be bringing this issue forward in the middle of the COVID-19 crisis. City Council and Committee meetings are not open to the public to physically attend. Members of the public are struggling to cope with the multiple pressures that they face, compounding over the past 16 weeks. At the start of July, many are trying to just get something of a holiday, if possible. For its part, the AODA Alliance is overloaded with issues on which to advocate for people with disabilities during the COVID-19 crisis. For the City of Toronto to force us to divert our volunteer advocacy efforts to this e-scooter issue now is just one more unfair hardship.

If the City of Toronto Infrastructure and Environment Committee is looking for a new and important priority agenda item to address, it should work comprehensively on making Toronto’s infrastructure fully accessible to people with disabilities. The Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act requires Toronto, including its infrastructure, to become accessible to people with disabilities by 2025, under 4.5 years from now. Toronto is not anywhere close to being on schedule to reach that goal.

2. E-Scooters Endanger Public Safety Causing Injuries and Deaths

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, our hospitals and emergency rooms were backlogged, resulting in the scourge of hallway medicine. The COVID-19 pandemic has imposed unprecedented added demands and pressures on our health care system, including our hospitals.

The Staff Report’s analysis amply shows that if e-scooters are allowed, this will lead to an increase in personal injuries, both to e-scooter riders and innocent pedestrians. Of course, this will create additional demands and pressures on over-burdened hospital emergency rooms. The Staff Report states:

“The City has a Vision Zero commitment to eliminate serious injuries and fatalities resulting from roadway crashes, particularly around six emphasis areas including pedestrians, school children, and older adults. Replacing car trips with e-scooter trips presents an opportunity to address some road safety issues if e-scooters produce a net safety benefit, especially for these groups. A 2020 International Transport Forum study notes that the risk of hospital admission may be higher for e-scooter riders than for cyclists, but that there are too few studies to draw firm conclusions. While not comprehensive, the emerging evidence of the health impacts associated with e-scooter use warrants a cautious approach to mitigate risks to e-scooter riders, pedestrians, and the City. Some of the findings are below.

New e-scooters users are most likely to be injured with 63 percent of injuries occurring within the first nine times using an e-scooter. (CDC and City of Austin)

A comparison of serious injury rates between Calgary’s 2019 shared e-scooter pilot and Bike Share Toronto suggests riding a shared e-scooter is potentially about 350 times more likely to result in a serious injury than riding a shared bike on a per km basis, and about 100 times more likely on a per trip basis. This includes a limited sample size, differing definitions for serious injuries, different city contexts (e.g., Calgary allowed e-scooter riding on sidewalks, whereas bicycle riding is not allowed on sidewalks in Toronto) and serious injuries may decline over time as people gain experience riding e-scooters. (Montréal reported few e-scooter injuries for its 2019 pilot, however, it is unclear whether and how data for serious injuries was gathered.) Calculations are based on: 33 ER visits requiring ambulance transport over three months (Jul to Sep 2019) in Calgary for e-scooter-related injuries with a reported 750,000 trips, and average trip length of 0.9km; and 2,439,000 trips for Bike Share Toronto, with 3km average trip length, over 12 months in 2019, and no serious injuries (e.g., broken bones, head trauma, hospitalization) but attributing one for comparison purposes. Further data collection and studies of injuries are needed on a per km basis, by type of trip (i.e., recreational versus commuting, facility type), and by injury type.

The fatality rate for shared e-scooter users is potentially nine to 18 times the rate of bike share-related deaths in the U.S., based on a news report in the Chicago reader.

Head trauma was reported in nearly one third of all e-scooter-related injuries in the U.S. from 2014 to 2018 – more than twice the rate of head injuries to bicyclists. In a City of Austin study in 2018 over three months, 48 per cent of e-scooter riders who were hurt had head injuries (91 out of 190), with 15 per cent (28 riders) experiencing more serious traumatic brain injuries.

Falling off e-scooters was the cause of 80 percent of injuries (183 riders); 20 percent (45 riders) had collided with a vehicle or an object, according to a 2019 UCLA study of two hospital ERs in one year. Just over eight per cent of the injuries were to pedestrians injured as a result of e-scooters (11 hit by an e-scooter, 5 tripped over a parked e-scooter, and 5 were attempting to move an e-scooter not in use).

Hospital data will be key to track injuries and fatalities by type and severity, especially for incidents where no motor vehicle has been involved (e.g., losing control) or for a trip and fall involving improperly parked e-scooters. As an ICD-10 code (international standard injury reporting code) specific to e-scooters will not be implemented in Canada until at least spring 2021, a reliable method to track serious e-scooter related injuries and fatalities presenting at hospitals is currently not available.”

“Finally, the risk of injury for new users is high, and could put additional burden on local hospitals and paramedics at this time. For the reasons above, City staff do not recommend permitting e-scooters in ActiveTO facilities in 2020.”

“Cities that initially allowed e-scooters on sidewalks have since banned them due to safety issues (pedestrian deaths and injuries), e.g., France, Spain, Singapore and San Diego; and other jurisdictions such Ottawa’s National Capital Commission have banned e-scooters on mixed use trails/paths.

E-scooters have been prohibited also from mixed use paths or in parks because of the intermixing with people and children on foot, who are slower, and also making unpredictable movements when using public space for leisure and recreational purposes. In cities such as Berlin, Paris and Tel Aviv, where e-scooters are permitted for operation on roads or bike lanes, and not sidewalks, there have been compliance and enforcement issues with these rules. Some cities (such as Atlanta) and countries (such as the UK) have accelerated bicycle infrastructure projects after e-scooter fatalities, and in anticipation of expanding micro mobility. In May 2020, the UK announced a £250 million emergency active travel fund – the first stage of a £2 billion investment supporting cycling, walking and bus-only infrastructure.”

“Paris and Singapore banned e-scooters from being used on sidewalks. This ban occurred as a result of pedestrian deaths from e-scooter collisions on sidewalks.”

“In the City of Austin, 63% of injuries occurred within the first nine rides of using an e-scooter. About 50% are head injuries and 35% are fractures. Less than 1% wore helmets. (Centers for Disease Control & Prevention and City of Austin)”

“In Chicago, 10 pedestrians were sent to the emergency room after being hit by e-scooter users in their 4 month pilot project. There were a total of 192 emergency room visits related to e-scooters in these 4 months.”

As well, the PowerPoint that City staff presented at the February 3, 2020 meeting of the City of Toronto’s Accessibility Advisory Committee noted these statistics from Calgary:

“Calgary mid-pilot report for period approx. July to mid-October 2019:

  • 33 ER visits requiring ambulance rides, one of these was a pedestrian; 677 ER visits total”

3. E-Scooters Endanger Safety and Accessibility for People with Disabilities

The Staff Report also shows that e-scooters endanger safety and accessibility for people with disabilities. It states:

“E-scooters pose a risk to people with disabilities due to their faster speeds and lack of noise. Cities that have allowed e-scooters have observed a high incidence of sidewalk riding by riders, whether permitted or not on sidewalks. Parked e-scooters, especially when part of a dockless sharing system, can pose trip hazards and obstacles. Seniors, people with disabilities, and those with socio-economic challenges could face negative outcomes if injured in a collision or fall. Solutions to enforcement and compliance are still in their infancy.””

“Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA)

Persons with disabilities and seniors have considerable concerns about sidewalk and crosswalk interactions with e-scooter users, as well as concerns regarding trip hazards and obstructions from poorly parked or excessive amounts of e-scooters. The Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee, a body required under the AODA, recommends that City Council prohibit the use of e-scooters in public spaces, including sidewalks and roads. In other jurisdictions outside of Ontario, some legal action has been undertaken against municipalities by persons injured as a result of e-scooter sidewalk obstructions, as well as by persons with disabilities.”

The Staff Report’s recommendations to take steps towards allowing e-scooters in Toronto are directly contrary to the strong, unanimous recommendation to the City of Toronto by the statutorily-mandated Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee. As the Staff Report notes, that Committee recommended that e-scooters not be allowed in Toronto. The Staff Report states:

“On February 3, 2020, the Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee recommended City Council prohibit e-scooters for use in public spaces including sidewalks and roads, and directed that any City permission granted to e-scooter companies be guided by public safety, in robust consultation with people living with disabilities, and related organizations serving this population.””

The City staff’s PowerPoint, presented to the February 3, 2020 meeting of the City of Toronto Accessibility Advisory Committee also identified this feedback that the City had received:

“Key Stakeholder Feedback So Far

  • Accessibility / persons with disabilities groups
  • Visually-impaired/blind cannot hear or see e-scooter riders, trip hazards with e-scooters, collisions and near collisions/friction on sidewalks and serious injuries from losing balance and falling, no insurance, challenges with enforcement / claims
  • Pedestrian-related – walkability, friction on sidewalks, trip hazards, collisions”

The Staff Report’s recommendations to take steps towards allowing e-scooters in Toronto are also totally contrary to the strong recommendations of 11 disability organizations in the January 22, 2020 open letter sent by the AODA Alliance to the mayors and councils of all Ontario municipalities, set out in this brief’s appendix.

4. If E-Scooters Are Allowed in Toronto, They Will Be Ridden on Sidewalks Even If That is Forbidden

Any consideration of e-scooters must operate on the premise that e-scooter riders will ride e-scooters on sidewalks, even if this is strictly banned. This contributes to the dangers to the public including people with disabilities. The Staff Report states:

  • “Cities that have allowed e-scooters have observed a high incidence of sidewalk riding by riders, whether permitted or not on sidewalks.”
  • “Most jurisdictions experienced illegal sidewalk riding by e-scooter users…”
  • “E-scooter riders will also likely ride on sidewalks, even if not allowed.”

(from feedback from a focus group of Toronto cyclists)

5. E-Scooters Will Saddle the Taxpayer With Financial Burdens While the E-Scooter Rental Companies Make the Profits

The Staff Report demonstrates that to allow e-scooters will inflict new costs and financial burdens on the taxpayer. The AODA Alliance takes the position that these burdens should not be inflicted on the public, especially after our society has had to suffer the crushing financial impact of the COVID-19 crisis, an impact that is continuing with no end in sight. If more public money were now to be spent, it should not be on the costs that the City of Toronto would have to shoulder due to the introduction of e-scooters.

The Staff Report states:

* “There is a significant risk that the City may be held partially or fully liable for damages if e-scooter riders or other parties are injured. Transportation Services staff consulted with the City’s Insurance and Risk Management office (I&RM) to understand the magnitude of the City’s liability if allowing e-scooters. At this time, loss data is lacking on e-scooters due to generally lengthy settlement times for bodily injury claims. The City has significant liability exposure, however, due to joint and several liability, as the City may have to pay an entire judgement or claim even if only found to be 1 percent at fault for an incident. The City has a $5M deductible per occurrence, which means the City will be responsible for all costs below that amount. In terms of costs, Transportation Services staff will also be required to investigate and serve in the discovery process for claims.”

“If Council were to permit e-scooters to be operated on City streets – without the commensurate resources to provide oversight, education, outreach and enforcement, there would be considerable risks to public safety for e-scooter riders and other vulnerable road users; additional burdens on hospitals and paramedics; impacts on accessibility, community nuisance and complaints; impacts on current initiatives to enhance the public realm for COVID-19 recovery efforts, such as CurbTO and CaféTO; and liability and costs to the City. For the reasons above, staff recommend that personal use of e-scooters not be considered until 2021.”

“FINANCIAL IMPACT:

Funding and resources required in various programs for the following will be included as part of future budget submissions for consideration during the budget process to address the financial and additional staff resources required to: manage implementation, operational, and enforcement issues of e-scooters in Toronto; and the resolution of e-scooter issues, including, but not limited to, injury/fatality and collision investigations and data collection and tracking (e.g., in consultation with health agencies and/or academic partners, Toronto Police Services, and others), further standards development for e-scooter device design, and consultations on proposed by-law changes with accessibility and other stakeholders.”

The key proponents of e-scooters are the e-scooter rental companies that stand to profit from their use. The Staff Report shows that e-scooter rental companies take active steps to dodge any liability for the damage that their e-scooters cause. The Staff Report also shows that the insurance industry does not have the insurance products needed in this area. City staff explored the possibility of injury claims being covered by The Motor Vehicle Accident Claims Fund. That fund is financed by the taxpayer. That option would again let e-scooter rental companies reap the profits while the taxpayer covers the consequent costs.

The Staff Report states:

“E-scooter sharing/rental companies typically require a rider to sign a waiver, placing the onus of compensating injured parties on the rider. Riders are left financially exposed due to a lack of insurance coverage and if unable to pay, municipalities will be looked to for compensation (e.g., in settlements and courts). Claims related to e-scooter malfunction have been reported by the media (such as in Atlanta, Auckland, New Zealand and Brisbane, Australia). In 2019, a Grand Jury faulted the City of San Diego for inadequate regulation and enforcement of e-scooter sharing companies. By opting in to the Pilot, the City will be exposed to claims associated with improperly parked e-scooters as evidenced by lawsuits filed by persons with disabilities and those injured by e-scooter obstructions (such as in Minneapolis and Santa Monica, California).

The insurance industry does not currently have insurance products available for e-scooter riders. In Fall 2019, City staff explored whether the Motor Vehicle Accident Claims Fund could be expanded or if a similar kind of fund in principle could be created to address claims where e-scooter riders or non-users are injured and their expenses are not covered by OHIP, nor by other insurance policies (e.g., homeowner’s or personal auto). Further research and consultation would be needed to look into these considerations.

It will be critical to ensure that insurance evidenced by e-scooter sharing companies will cover their operations for all jurisdictions operated in (e.g., all cities nationally or internationally). Further, there needs to be full indemnification for the municipality by e-scooter sharing companies, and not limitations in their indemnification contracts.”

6. Stronger Provincial Regulations Needed Before Even Starting with E-Scooters

Even if the City Council were to consider moving forward at all with e-scooters, the Staff Report’s analysis shows that any municipal consideration of this should be deferred until key missing action by the Ontario Government has been taken. The Staff Report shows the need for stronger provincial regulations on e-scooters safety to be enacted as an important precursor to introducing e-scooters. The Staff Report states:

“Although the HTA sets out some e-scooter standards, such as maximum speed and power wattage, due to the nature of urban and suburban conditions such as Toronto’s, City staff recommend that the Province strengthen the device standards for greater rider safety. Based on an extensive literature review, items recommended for further Provincial exploration include a maximum turning radius, a platform surface grip, wheel characteristics (e.g., minimum size, traction, tire width), braking and suspension.

In addition, the Province has not established set fine amounts for offences under the HTA e-scooter regulations. Without this in place, for the police to lay a charge in respect of a violation, a “Part III Summons” is required, which means the police must attend court for each charge laid regardless of severity, and a trial is required for a conviction and fine to be set. This may make it less likely that charges are laid. Fines outside of ones the City could set (e.g. e-scooter parking violations, illegal sidewalk riding) would create workload challenges for Police and courts.”

“In spite of the Pilot requirement to collect data, there is currently no vehicle type for e-scooters in the Ministry of Transportation’s (MTO) Motor Vehicle Collision Report (MVCR) template used by all police services to report collisions. Unless the Province specifies e-scooters are motor vehicles for the purposes of collision reporting, and has a field for this in its template, e-scooter collisions may not be reported reliably and meaningful collision data analysis will not be possible. In Fall 2019, City staff requested that the MTO add e-scooters as a separate vehicle type, but MTO has not yet communicated they would make this change.”

“This report also recommends the need for improved industry standards at the provincial and federal levels for greater consumer protection in the purchase and/or use of e-scooters. While staff are aware that e-scooters are being considered as an open-air transportation option, the absence of improved standards and available insurance for e-scooter riders, coupled with lack of enforcement resources, would risk the safety of riders and the public on the City’s streets and sidewalks, especially for people with disabilities.”

(Among the Staff Report’s recommendations)

“3. City Council requests that the Ontario Ministry of Transportation amend the Motor Vehicle Collision Report to add electric kick-scooters as a vehicle type and to treat e-scooters as a motor vehicle for reporting purposes….

  1. City Council requests that the Ontario Ministry of Transportation and the Ontario Ministry of the Attorney General establish set fines for violations of O. Reg. 389/19, Pilot Project – Electric Kick-Scooters, and communicate these set fines to Toronto Police Services through an All Chiefs Bulletin.

  1. City Council requests that the Ontario Ministry of Transportation strengthen its standards and specifications for e-scooters in O. Reg. 389/19, Pilot Project – Electric Kick-Scooters based on the latest best practice research.”

7. Substantial Effective Enforcement Would Be Needed But Has Not Been Planned For

The Staff Report repeatedly recognizes the importance of rule enforcement regarding the use of e-scooters. The AODA Alliance adds that it is deeply troubling that the City of Ottawa allocated no additional funds for enforcement during its current pilot with e-scooter and appears to have imposed no fine for law-breakers.

The Toronto Staff Report does not spell out how many enforcement officers would be needed to effectively enforce e-scooter rules if allowed in Toronto, or what this would cost the taxpayer to enforce (including court resources). As noted above, certain key standards are missing which would be important for effective enforcement. The Staff Report states:

“Solutions to enforcement and compliance are still in their infancy.”

“Other key issues raised in the consultations include lack of enforcement and adequate infrastructure; and questions about environmental sustainability, public space and the potential for clutter and safety hazards particularly for people with disabilities.”

“In general, jurisdictions do not have the capacity to enforce compliance. For example, Tel Aviv has a unit of 22 inspectors dedicated to enforcing that e-scooters do not ride on sidewalks. These inspectors are able to issue tickets for sidewalk violations, but only the police have the authority to issue tickets to riders not wearing helmets, as required by law. 21,000 tickets for sidewalk offenses were issued in 2019.”

8. Toronto Is Especially Ill-Suited For E-Scooters

The Staff Report’s contents give additional reasons why Toronto is in reality especially ill-suited for allowing e-scooters. The Staff Report states:

“In addition to the experiences in other jurisdictions, several risk factors are unique to the City of Toronto and play a role in informing the recommended approach to e-scooters:

Streetcar tracks: Toronto has an extensive track network (177 linear kilometres) which poses a hazard to e-scooter riders due to the vehicle’s small wheel diameter.

Winter and State-Of-Good-Repair: Toronto experiences freezing and thawing that impacts the state-of-good-repair for roads. A large portion of roads are 40 to 50 years old, with 43 percent of Major Roads and 24 percent of Local Roads in poor condition. Coupled with lack of standards for e-scooter wheels (e.g., traction, size), this makes this particular device more sensitive to uneven road surfaces.

High construction activity: In addition to the city’s various infrastructure projects, Toronto has been one of the fastest growing cities with about 120 development construction sites in 2019.

Narrow sidewalks and high pedestrian mode shares in the Downtown Core and City Centres: Most jurisdictions experienced illegal sidewalk riding by e-scooter users, with some business districts saying e-scooters deterred patrons from visiting their previously pedestrian-friendly main streets. This is especially challenging with physical distancing requirements and other COVID-19 recovery programs expanding the use of the City’s sidewalks and boulevards.”

9. Toronto Should At Least Defer Discussion of E-Scooters Until After the COVID-19 Pandemic Is Over

The Staff Report’s analysis supports the conclusion that any actual introduction of e-scooters in Toronto should not take place during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Staff Report states:

“Other cities have suspended e-scooter sharing services until after COVID-19 (e.g., Windsor approved a shared e-scooter pilot in April 2020, but has now deferred its pilot until after COVID-19). Prior to the pandemic, a number of jurisdictions (e.g., Boulder, Honolulu, and Houston) had refused to allow or banned the use of e-scooters due to public safety concerns. Key cities with similar population, urban form, and/or climate have not yet piloted e-scooters such as New York City (Manhattan/New York County ban), Philadelphia, and Sydney, Australia.”

“While staff have considered a potential e-scooter pilot on ActiveTO major road closures, it would pose risks to vulnerable road users and leave the City open to considerable liability and risk due to lack of resources for oversight, education and enforcement at this time. A key purpose of ActiveTO is to provide a mixed use space for physical activity for people of all ages for walking, jogging and human-powered cycling. Piloting a new vehicle type that is throttle-powered and can potentially exceed speeds of 24km/hr poses risks to vulnerable road users in such conditions. It could also lead to confusion about which infrastructure or facilities under ActiveTO are permissible, and this would pose public safety risks that the City does not have resources to manage at this time.”

“If Council were to permit e-scooters to be operated on City streets – without the commensurate resources to provide oversight, education, outreach and enforcement, there would be considerable risks to public safety for e-scooter riders and other vulnerable road users; additional burden on hospitals and paramedics; impacts on accessibility, community nuisance and complaints; impacts on current initiatives to enhance the public realm for COVID-19 recovery efforts, such as CurbTO and CaféTO; and liability and costs to the City. For the reasons above, staff recommend that personal use of e-scooters not be considered until 2021.”

10. E-Scooters Not Shown to Significantly Reduce Road Traffic or Pollution

The corporate lobbyists for e-scooter rental companies claim that if e-scooters are allowed, this will reduce road traffic. The Staff Report shows that e-scooters do not bring the major benefits that the corporate lobbyists claim. The Staff Report states:

“While some mode shift from driving to using an e-scooter has occurred in other cities, the majority of e-scooter trips would have been by walking or public transit (around 60% for Calgary and Portland; and 86% in Greater Paris). For example, 55 per cent would have walked instead of using an e-scooter (Calgary). From a Paris area survey, 44 per cent would have walked, 30 percent would have used public transit, and 12 per cent would have used a bicycle/shared bike; while this study noted that e-scooters had no impact on car equipment reduction, an extrapolation would assume that 14 per cent would have used a car/ride hail/taxi, which still represents a minor shift away from motorized vehicular use.”

“Transportation accounts for about 38% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Toronto (2017). E-scooters are promoted as a near-zero local GHG transportation option as the electricity grid in Ontario is very low-carbon. A 2019 study based on life-cycle analysis suggests that average greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per e-scooter mile travelled were half the amount associated with a car, but 20 times than that of a personal bicycle. Suggesting that reliance on e-scooters alone to shift people out of cars and to reduce GHGs and environmental impacts may not be entirely effective. Environmental impacts of e-scooters include disused e-scooters arising from the device’s short lifespan, toxic materials from battery waste, and emissions from the manufacturing, shipping, and maintenance of sharing fleets. In May 2020, Jump reportedly scrapped thousands (possibly 20,000) still functional e-bikes, and in June 2020, an estimated 8,000 to 10,000 Circ e-scooters were scrapped in the Middle East.”

The main reason for allowing e-scooters (beyond the profits of e-scooter rental companies) would be that they are fun to ride. The AODA Alliance proposes that this is hardly a reason to incur the dangers to safety, to accessibility for people with disabilities and the greater financial burdens on the taxpayer. The Staff Report states:

“The key appeal and popularity of e-scooters is that they are fun and convenient, particularly to people under the age of 35. They are often used for recreation and touring, but can also be used as a method of commuting or for taking short utilitarian trips. They reduce effort and sweat from exertion compared to human-powered kick-scooters and bicycles. They also enable people to go farther distances than on foot. A large part of the convenience is that there is no need to search for parking as there is with a car; adding to that e-scooters are easy to access, if folded and carried with the user, or if available through a dockless sharing system where the devices are widely available on the street.”

11. Steps that Must Be Taken If the City of Toronto Nevertheless Allows E-Scooters Despite Their Dangers

If e-scooters are to be allowed, over the many objections and despite all the evidence showing their dangers and lack of proven benefits, these requirements should be mandatory:

  1. a) Riding an e-scooter on any sidewalk should be strictly prohibited with a very substantial law enforcement presence and with very steep penalties, including a lifetime ban on using e-scooters. A mere fine is insufficient for such dangerous conduct.
  1. b) The rental of e-scooters should be prohibited with steep penalties for renting an e-scooter.
  1. c) There should be a strict ban on leaving an e-scooter in a public sidewalk or like public location, except in a municipally-approved rack that is located far out of the path of pedestrian travel. If an e-scooter is left on a sidewalk or other public place that is not such a rack, it should be subject to immediate confiscation and forfeiture, as well as a strict penalty.
  1. d) If e-scooter rentals are allowed, e-scooter rental companies should be liable for loss or injuries caused by any renter of the company’s e-scooter, with no waiver of this liability being permitted.
  1. e) There should be a ban on parking an e-scooter within 250 meters of a public establishment serving alcohol.
  1. f) If e-scooters are permitted, they should be required to make an ongoing clearly audible beeping sound when powered on, to warn others of their approach.
  1. g) The speed limit for e-scooters should be set much lower than 24 KPH, such as 15 KPH.
  1. h) An e-scooter driver should be required to successfully complete training on its safe operation and on the rules of the road, and to get a license. This should not be simply done through a smartphone, where a person can simply click that they read the training materials, even if they did not.
  1. i) Each e-scooter should be required to have a vehicle license whose number is visibly displayed.
  1. j) An e-scooter’s owner and driver should be required to carry sufficient liability insurance for injuries or damages that the e-scooter causes to others.
  1. k) E-scooter drivers of any age should be required to wear a helmet, and not just those under 18.
  1. l) A very small number of e-scooters should be permitted in any pilot, such as 250.
  1. m) If e-scooter rentals are to be permitted, a rider must be required to register their own name for each ride, and not merely rely on an app which could be signed up under a friend’s name. It should be made easy to identify a rented e-scooter–rider. The identity of the renter should be mandatorily disclosed on request to any person alleging that they were injured by the e-scooter.
  1. n) If e-scooter rentals are to be allowed via a “BikeShare” regime, the law should require that the e-scooter parking stations be located in a place that cannot block accessibility for people with disabilities. (Note: the draft bylaw included in the Staff Report imposes no such requirement)
  1. o) If the City is to take any further steps, it should convene an actual (not virtual) town hall meeting on e-scooters once the COVID-19 pandemic has subsided, to bring together both people with disabilities and the e-scooter rental companies for a joint public meeting to discuss all issues, at which the City’s leadership should be present.

Appendix – January 22, 2020 Open Letter from Major Disability Organizations

Open Letter

January 22, 2020

To: Hon. Premier Doug Ford

Via Email: [email protected] [email protected]

Room 281, Legislative Building

Queen’s Park

Toronto, Ontario

M7A 1A1

And to: All Members of the Ontario Legislature

And to: The Mayors and Councils of All Municipalities in Ontario

Copy to: The Hon. Raymond Cho, Minister for Accessibility and Seniors

Via email: [email protected]

College Park 5th Floor

777 Bay St

Toronto, ON M7A 1S5

And copied to:

The Hon. Caroline Mulroney, Minister of Transportation

Via email: [email protected]

5th Floor

777 Bay St.

Toronto, ON M7A 1Z8

I. Introduction

The undersigned community organizations and groups ask the Ontario Government and Ontario municipalities to take the actions listed below to protect the public, and especially Ontarians with disabilities, from the danger to public safety and the accessibility of their communities that is created by the Ontario Government’s new regulation on electric scooters (e-scooters). This regulation lets municipalities choose to permit people to use e-scooters in public.

On November 27, 2019, the Ontario Government announced a new regulation. It lets Ontario municipalities allow the use of e-scooters for a pilot of up to five years. An e-scooter is a motor vehicle that a person rides standing up. It can be very quickly throttled up to fast speeds of at least 24 KPH. It is silent even when ridden at fast speeds.

This Ontario regulation lets e-scooters be ridden on roads as well as sidewalks. It does not require a rider to have a driver’s license, or to have training in the e-scooter’s safe use or in the rules of the road. It does not require the e-scooter’s driver or owner to have insurance.

The e-scooter model does not have to be certified as safe by the Canada Safety Association or other recognized certifying body. The e-scooter need not have a vehicle license, or display a license number, that could help identify the vehicle in the case of an injury.

The Ontario Government said that this pilot is to study use of e-scooters. However, the regulation has not required a municipality that permits e-scooters to study their impact, or to report any study to the public. There has been no showing why five years is needed.

II. E-Scooters Endanger Public Safety, Especially for People with Disabilities

Unlicensed, untrained, uninsured people racing on silent e-scooters in public places, including sidewalks, endanger the public, and especially people with disabilities. Ontarians with disabilities and others will be exposed to the danger of serious personal injuries or worse. Pedestrians cannot hear silent e-scooters racing towards them. This is especially dangerous for people who are blind or have low vision or balance issues, or whose disability makes them slower to move out of the way.

In jurisdictions where they are allowed, e-scooters present these dangers. Ontario does not need a pilot to prove this. In an August 30, 2019 CityTV report, the Ontario Government stated that it had compromised between protecting public safety on the one hand, and advancing business opportunities and consumer choice on the other, when it first designed its proposal for a five-year e-scooter pilot.

III. E-Scooters Will Create New Accessibility Barriers for People with Disabilities

The new Ontario e-scooter regulation will also lead to the creation of serious new accessibility barriers against accessibility for Ontarians with disabilities. In jurisdictions where e-scooters are allowed, e-scooters are frequently left lying in public, strewed around sidewalks and other public places.

Leaving e-scooters on sidewalks is central to the plans of at least some businesses who want to rent e-scooters in Ontario, according to a September 10, 2019 Toronto Star article. The companies that rent e-scooters to the public provide a mobile app. Using that app, anyone can pick up an e-scooter, rent it, ride it to their destination, and then leave it in a random place on the sidewalk or other public place for another person to later pick it up and rent it.

For people who are blind, deafblind or have low vision, e-scooters can be a serious and unexpected tripping hazard. There is no way to plan a walking route to avoid them. They should not have to face the new prospect of e-scooters potentially lying in their path at any time.

Leaving e-scooters randomly on sidewalks also creates a serious, unpredictable new accessibility barrier for people using a wheelchair, walker or other mobility device. An e-scooter can block them from continuing along an otherwise-accessible sidewalk. People with disabilities using a mobility device may not be able to go up on the grass or down onto the road, to get around an e-scooter blocking the sidewalk. Sidewalks or other public spaces should not be made available to private e-scooter rental companies as free publicly-funded parking spaces.

Under the Charter of Rights, the Ontario Human Rights Code and the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, the Ontario Government and municipalities are required to prevent the creation of new accessibility barriers against Ontarians with disabilities. As the 2019 final report of the most recent Independent Review of the AODA’s implementation, by former Lieutenant Governor David Onley revealed, Ontario is behind schedule for becoming accessible by 2025. The Onley report found that Ontario remains a province full of “soul-crushing barriers”. The introduction of e-scooters will create new barriers and make this worse.

IV. Measures In Place Don’t Effectively Remove These Serious Dangers to Public Safety and Disability Accessibility

The Ontario Government’s November 27, 2019 announcement of its new e-scooter regulation did not refer to any disability concerns. The Government announced some restrictions on use of e-scooters. However, those measures do not effectively address the serious concerns raised here.

The Government lists some optional recommended “best practices” for municipalities. Those don’t remove the dangers to public safety or accessibility for people with disabilities. In any event, no municipality is required to implement them.

The regulation permits the use of e-scooters on sidewalks if a municipality wishes. It has restrictions on the speed for riding an e-scooter on sidewalks, and on the rider leaving an e-scooter on the ground, blocking pedestrian travel. However, these are extremely difficult, if not impossible, to enforce. Municipalities don’t have enforcement officers on every sidewalk to catch offenders. When a pedestrian, including a person with a disability, is blocked by an e-scooter abandoned on the sidewalk, there is no way to identify the rider who left it there. A pedestrian who is the victim of a hit and run, will find it extremely difficult if not impossible to identify who hit them. E-scooter rental companies are not made responsible for their e-scooters endangering public safety or accessibility.

E-scooters will increase costs for the taxpayer, including hospital and ambulance costs and law enforcement costs. The Ontario Government has not announced any new funding for municipalities for these costs.

The new Ontario regulation leaves it to each municipality to decide whether to allow e-scooters, and if so, on what terms. This requires Ontarians with disabilities to advocate to hundreds of municipalities, one at a time, to protect their safety and accessibility in public places. Ontarians with disabilities don’t have the resources and capacity for this.

It would not be sufficient for e-scooter rental companies to launch a campaign to urge renters not to leave e-scooters on sidewalks, or for e-scooter rental companies to make it a condition on their mobile app that the user will not leave a rented e-scooter on a sidewalk. People routinely agree to mobile app conditions without reading them. This does not excuse e-scooter rental companies from e-scooters’ known dangers.

V. Actions We Ask the Ontario Government and Ontario Municipalities To Take

(i) Actions We Ask The Ontario Government To Take
  1. E-scooters should not be allowed in public places in Ontario. There should be no pilot project in Ontario because it would endanger public safety and disability accessibility. If the Ontario Government wants to study e-scooters, it should study their impact on public safety and disability accessibility in other jurisdictions that have allowed them.
  1. If, despite these concerns, the Ontario Government wants to hold a trial period with e-scooters, it should suspend its new Ontario e-scooters regulation until it has implemented measures to ensure that they do not endanger the public’s safety or accessibility for people with disabilities.
  1. If Ontario holds an e-scooter pilot, it should be for much less than five years, e.g. six months. The Ontario Government should retain a trusted independent organization with expertise in public safety and disability accessibility to study e-scooters’ impact. It should make public the study’s findings.
  1. If despite these dangers, Ontario allows the use of e-scooters in public in Ontario, the Ontario Government should first enact and effectively enforce the following strong province-wide mandatory legal requirements for their use. Ontarians with disabilities should not have to advocate to each of the hundreds of Ontario municipalities to set these requirements:
  1. a) Riding an e-scooter on any sidewalk should be strictly prohibited with strong penalties.
  1. b) The rental of e-scooters should be prohibited, because the rental business model is based on e-scooters being left strewn about in public places like sidewalks.
  1. c) There should be a strict ban on leaving an e-scooter in a public sidewalk or like public location, except in a municipally-approved rack that is located well out of the path of pedestrian travel. If an e-scooter is left on a sidewalk or other public place that is not such a rack, it should be subject to immediate confiscation and forfeiture, as well as a strict penalty.
  1. d) If e-scooter rentals are allowed, rental companies should be required to obtain a license. They should be liable for loss or injuries caused by any renter of the company’s e-scooter.
  1. e) There should be a ban on parking an e-scooter within 250 meters of a public establishment serving alcohol.
  1. f) If e-scooters are permitted, they should be required to make an ongoing clearly audible beeping sound when powered on, to warn others of their approach.
  1. g) The speed limit for e-scooters should be set much lower than 24 KPH, such as 15 KPH.
  1. h) An e-scooter driver should be required to successfully complete training on its safe operation and on the rules of the road, and to get a license.
  1. i) Each e-scooter should be required to have a vehicle license whose number is visibly displayed.
  1. j) An e-scooter’s owner and driver should be required to carry sufficient liability insurance for injuries or damages that the e-scooter causes to others.
  1. k) E-scooter drivers of any age should be required to wear a helmet, and not just those under 18.
  1. If the Ontario Government does not impose all the safety and accessibility requirements in Recommendation 4 above, then it should pass legislation that empowers each municipality to impose all the preceding requirements.
(ii) Actions We Ask Each Municipality in Ontario To Take
  1. To protect the safety of the public, including people with disabilities, and to avoid creating new barriers to accessibility impeding people with disabilities, no municipality should allow e-scooters in their community.
  1. If a municipality nevertheless decides to allow e-scooters, it should impose all the requirements in Recommendation 4 above. It should not allow e-scooters for more than six months as a pilot project, while undertaking the study on their impact on public safety and accessibility for people with disabilities.

In proposing these seven measures, we emphasize that nothing should be done to reduce or restrict the availability or use of powered mobility devices used by people with disabilities, which travel at much slower speeds and which are a vital form of accessibility technology.

Signed,

  1. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance
  2. March of Dimes of Canada
  3. Canadian National Institute for the Blind
  4. ARCH Disability Law Centre
  5. Spinal Cord Injury Ontario
  6. Ontario Autism Coalition
  7. Older Women’s Network
  8. Alliance for Equality of Blind Canadians
  9. Guide Dog Users of Canada
  10. Views for the Visually Impaired
  11. Citizens With Disabilities – Ontario



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