Changes to Saskatchewan wildlife regulations make it easier for hunters with mobility impairments


Changes are being made to wildlife regulations in Saskatchewan, giving better access to hunters dealing with mobility impairments using a motorized wheelchair, in an announcement made by the province Monday.

In 2020, Saskatchewan allowed the use of motorized mobility equipment for hunters with disabilities, but required a permit.

Read more:
‘Choked me up’: motorized wheelchair takes hunter into the wild for the first time

The province dropped the need for a permit on Monday.

“This new legislation provides greater access and less red tape for hunters with mobility impairments,” said Warren Kaeding, Saskatchewan’s environment minister.

“Hunters will be able to take advantage of new technologies in motorized mobility equipment, without the requirement of obtaining a permit to use the equipment.  This is a great example of how a policy can evolve to meet the needs of Saskatchewan residents.”

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Bobbie Cherepuschak tests out the snow blade attachment on his new motorized wheelchair.


Bobbie Cherepuschak tests out the snow blade attachment on his new motorized wheelchair.


Supplied

It’s something Bobby Cherepuschak, an avid hunter with a mobility impairment, said will have a positive impact on those dealing with similar issues.

“Now anybody with a disability that can’t walk long distances or can’t walk at all, can now hunt out of one of these all-terrain action track chairs,” said Cherepuschak.

“It’s going to be awesome, more people are going to get out and enjoy the outdoors.”

More changes to The Wildlife Regulations Amendment Act, 2021 include:

  • Prohibit the feeding of dangerous animals, to help alleviate increased concerns related to dangerous wildlife in the province.  This includes feeding wildlife on the side of the road.  This prohibition will not apply to the use of bait for hunting or trapping purposes, conducting agricultural activities or operating licensed landfills.
  • Authorize the use of a Hunting, Angling and Trapping Licence (HAL) identification number to identify hunting baits and stands on Crown lands, as an alternative to an individual’s full name and address.
  • Authorize the disposal of inedible or diseased wildlife specimens to simplify the removal of carcasses deemed unfit for human consumption, including specimens infected with chronic wasting disease (CWD).

Read more:
Lumsden man hopes rule changes can improve hunting accessibility in Saskatchewan

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Further information regarding The Wildlife Regulations Amendment Act, 2021 can found on Saskatchewan’s website.


Click to play video: '‘Choked me up’: motorized wheelchair takes hunter into bush for the first time'







‘Choked me up’: motorized wheelchair takes hunter into bush for the first time


‘Choked me up’: motorized wheelchair takes hunter into bush for the first time – Feb 14, 2021




© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.





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Toronto Restaurant Discriminated Against Woman Who Uses Mobility Aids, Tribunal Rules


By Paola Loriggio
The Canadian Press
Posted August 13, 2020

TORONTO – A Toronto restaurant discriminated against a woman who uses mobility devices and publicly humiliated her by refusing to let her use its bathroom four years ago, the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario has ruled.

In a decision issued this week, the tribunal says Haily ButlerHenderson “experienced adverse treatment” when she was repeatedly refused access to a downstairs washroom at the Pentagram Bar and Grill on Aug. 19, 2016.

The tribunal says a server also physically blocked ButlerHenderson’s path and loudly proclaimed to other patrons that the then23yearold was accepting the risk and liability associated with going down the stairs.

“Instead of asking the applicant if she needed any accommodation or assistance to use the facilities, the server made a spectacle of the applicant in front of its other patrons which was discriminatory,” adjudicator Romona Gananathan wrote.

“She was eventually allowed to use the facilities but only with conditions.”

The tribunal ordered Pentagram, which did not participate in the proceedings, to pay ButlerHenderson $10,000 in compensation for injury to dignity, feelings and selfrespect.

The restaurant’s current management and staff must also undergo training on their obligations under the Human Rights Code of Ontario, and post signs related to those responsibilities on the premises.

ButlerHenderson welcomed the ruling on social media, saying it “sets a huge precedent for disabled people in the future.”

Her lawyer, Lorin MacDonald, said the ruling will “serve restaurateurs to take notice.”

“While it was distressing to have the restaurant owners completely ignore the human rights application and to wait so long for validation of the discrimination, the decision is important for two reasons: it is now a matter of public record, and it initiated and continues a worldwide discussion around the broader issue of access to public restrooms,” MacDonald said in a statement.

In her complaint, ButlerHenderson, who has spina bifida and uses forearm crutches as a mobility aid, said the incident took place as she was waiting for friends at a nearby coffee shop.

Lineups for the washroom there were too long so she went down the block to Pentagram and asked for permission to use the facilities, she said.

ButlerHenderson said the server specifically cited her use of crutches as a reason to deny her access to the washroom, stressing the restaurant would be held liable if she were to fall.

At one point, she said, the server physically barred her from going down the stairs. Eventually, staff relented and allowed her to use the washroom, but ButlerHenderson said the incident was humiliating and infringed on a basic human right.

The human rights complaint argues people with disabilities have the right to assume a certain amount of risk for themselves.

ButlerHenderson said it was not the server’s place to assess her ability to navigate the stairwell on the basis that she has a disability and relies on a mobility aid.

Original at https://globalnews.ca/news/7272464/torontorestaurantdiscriminatedwomanmobilityaidstribunal/




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Toronto restaurant discriminated against woman who uses mobility aids, tribunal rules – Toronto


TORONTO — A Toronto restaurant discriminated against a woman who uses mobility devices and “publicly humiliated” her by refusing to let her use its bathroom four years ago, the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario has ruled.

In a decision issued this week, the tribunal says Haily Butler-Henderson “experienced adverse treatment” when she was repeatedly refused access to a downstairs washroom at the Pentagram Bar and Grill on Aug. 19, 2016.

The tribunal says a server also physically blocked Butler-Henderson’s path and loudly proclaimed to other patrons that the then-23-year-old was accepting the risk and liability associated with going down the stairs.

Read more:
Toronto woman launches human rights complaint over washroom access issue

“Instead of asking the applicant if she needed any accommodation or assistance to use the facilities, the server made a spectacle of the applicant in front of its other patrons which was discriminatory,” adjudicator Romona Gananathan wrote.

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“She was eventually allowed to use the facilities but only with conditions.”

The tribunal ordered Pentagram, which did not participate in the proceedings, to pay Butler-Henderson $10,000 in compensation for injury to dignity, feelings and self-respect.

The restaurant’s current management and staff must also undergo training on their obligations under the Human Rights Code of Ontario, and post signs related to those responsibilities on the premises.

Butler-Henderson welcomed the ruling on social media, saying it “sets a huge precedent for disabled people in the future.”

Her lawyer, Lorin MacDonald, said the ruling will “serve restaurateurs to take notice.”

“While it was distressing to have the restaurant owners completely ignore the human rights application and to wait so long for validation of the discrimination, the decision is important for two reasons: it is now a matter of public record, and it initiated and continues a worldwide discussion around the broader issue of access to public restrooms,” MacDonald said in a statement.

Read more:
As economy recovers, some Toronto restaurants to end tipping

In her complaint, Butler-Henderson, who has spina bifida and uses forearm crutches as a mobility aid, said the incident took place as she was waiting for friends at a nearby coffee shop.

Story continues below advertisement

Lineups for the washroom there were too long so she went down the block to Pentagram and asked for permission to use the facilities, she said.

Butler-Henderson said the server specifically cited her use of crutches as a reason to deny her access to the washroom, stressing the restaurant would be held liable if she were to fall.

At one point, she said, the server physically barred her from going down the stairs. Eventually, staff relented and allowed her to use the washroom, but Butler-Henderson said the incident was humiliating and infringed on a basic human right.

The human rights complaint argues people with disabilities have the right to assume a certain amount of risk for themselves.

Butler-Henderson said it was not the server’s place to assess her ability to navigate the stairwell on the basis that she has a disability and relies on a mobility aid.




© 2020 The Canadian Press





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Mobility Awareness Month


This month is Mobility Awareness Month!

Mobility Awareness Month takes place across Canada in May every year. The month raises awareness about how people with physical disabilities can move freely and enjoy active lifestyles. In addition, the public can learn more about how people can use assistive devices and other equipment to be actively involved in their communities.

Mobility Awareness Month

Mobility Awareness Month is a chance for the public to learn how people use assistive devices to travel:

On outings with family or friends, such as to:

To sports they participate in, such as:

Assistive devices help people move freely and contribute actively to their communities.

Wheelchairs

A wheelchair is one of the most well-known symbols of accessibility worldwide. Some people use manual wheelchairs which they wheel with their arms. Other people steer power wheelchairs that have batteries and motors. In addition to the wheelchairs people use every day, there are also wheelchairs for specific activities, such as:

Sports, including:

Moreover, wheelchairs come in a variety of colours and styles. Some wheelchairs fold up while others do not. Furthermore, some people may use a wheelchair all the time. Others may sometimes use other mobility devices or walk short distances without devices. People may also transfer from their wheelchairs to other seats.

Walkers

Other people use walkers for stability. Some people use smaller walkers that they push in front of them. In contrast, others use larger ones which they stand in and pull behind them.

Support Canes

Other people may use canes for support and balance. Some people use one cane if one side of their body is stronger than the other. They hold the cane on the stronger side and move it when they take a step with their other foot. For instance, someone with a stronger left side holds their cane in their left hand. As they step with their right foot, they move their cane forward, then step with their left foot. Other people use two canes by holding one in each hand.

Support canes come in a variety of colours and styles. Some canes fold up while others do not. Moreover, support canes are short and often curved. Some canes have one tip that touches the ground, while others can have three or four tips.

White Canes

Many blind and visually impaired people use white canes to travel. People do not use their canes at home or in other familiar environments because they know exactly where everything is. However, when they travel outside their homes, people will almost always use their canes. Someone walking with a white cane moves it from side to side in front of them. The feel and sound of the cane on the ground or floor gives them information about what is ahead, including:

  • Steps or curbs
  • Obstacles, such as furniture
  • The texture of the ground (pavement, grass, snow, puddles, etc.) or floor (tile, carpet, etc.)

Canes are white so that they are visible to other travellers. Some canes fold up while others do not. Moreover, they are long and straight, rather than curved. This difference makes it easy to tell whether someone is using a cane for support or for mobility. In other words, someone using a mobility cane can usually balance easily. Likewise, someone using a support cane usually has average vision.

Meeting People who use Wheelchairs

Many people do not have friends, family members, or colleagues who use assistive devices. As a result, they may feel uncomfortable approaching someone using one, or wonder how to do so. Mobility Awareness Month is a chance for people to overcome this discomfort.

When meeting someone using an assistive device:

Speak directly to the person using the device, instead of asking other people questions about them.

When talking to someone in a wheelchair for more than a few minutes, ask the person whether or not to sit down to be at eye level.

An assistive device is part of its owner’s personal space. Therefore, only touch someone’s device when that person has given permission.

Similarly, if someone gives permission to move their canes or crutches, keep them within the person’s reach.

Use language or figures of speech related to walking or seeing, such as “step this way or “see you later”.

However, do not use phrases like “wheelchair-bound” or “confined to a wheelchair”. These phrases suggest that people are “trapped” in their wheelchairs. On the contrary, instead of imprisoning people, wheelchairs and other assistive devices free people to live full lives.

Happy Mobility Awareness Month to all our readers!




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Accommodating Workers with Physical or Mobility Disabilities


Under the employment standard of the AODA, employers must accommodate workers who have physical or mobility disabilities. Employers and coworkers can easily learn how to make the workplace accessible for workers with physical or mobility disabilities, such as spinal cord injuries, amputations, and muscular or neurological conditions that affect mobility.

Workers will be able to explain what their individual needs are and which accommodations, if any, they require.

Accommodating Workers with Physical or Mobility Disabilities

Assistive Devices and Service Animals

Some workers may use mobility devices to get to and around the workplace. For instance, these devices include:

  • Canes
  • Crutches
  • An orthotic brace
  • Prosthetic limbs
  • Scooters
  • Walkers
  • Manual or power wheelchairs

Some workers may always use assistive devices. Others may never use them, use them for part of the time, or use them for specific tasks, such as when they are fatigued or travelling long distances.

Workers may also have service animals, which help people perform tasks, such as regaining balance, retrieving dropped or out-of-reach items, or opening doors. Owners are trained to work with their animals, which learn how to behave in public places where non-service-animals are not allowed. Employers and coworkers should never touch an assistive device or service animal without its owner’s permission.

Invisible Physical Disabilities

Workers who do not use assistive devices or service animals may identify as having an invisible physical disability. They may have difficulty with tasks, such as standing, walking, balance, climbing stairs, or travelling long distances. Workers should choose whether or not to disclose their disabilities.  Furthermore, they should choose which colleagues, if any, they wish to disclose to.

General Communication Tips

Look at and speak to a worker with a physical disability directly instead of addressing a colleague or support person.

Employers or coworkers who think a worker might need help should ask instead of automatically assuming that the worker does. The worker will be best able to describe what kind of help is needed.

It is acceptable to use language or figures of speech relating to walking or grasping things or to offer to shake hands. If workers are uncomfortable with any of these behaviours, they will suggest alternatives.

Words and phrases like “immobile”, “wheelchair-bound”, or “confined to a wheelchair” are inappropriate since wheelchairs and other mobility devices promote users’ freedom of movement.

Employers or colleagues who are talking to a worker in a wheelchair for more than a few minutes should sit down to be at eye level.

When giving directions, think about routes without stairs, sharp curbs, or steep hills. Some workers may need more time to traverse longer distances, while others will find outdoor travel more difficult in rain and snow.

Travelling To and Around the Workplace

Some workers will drive, possibly using vehicles equipped with hand controls or left foot gas pedals, and will require accessible parking spaces. In contrast, others will arrive using public transit or a para-transit service. In addition, workers’ routes to, into, through and between work buildings, especially locations like washrooms, lunch rooms, or break rooms, must be accessible. Some workers will need level or ramped entrances or automatic doors. Others will require that their workstations be near these locations and any machines they use on a regular basis. Some workers may always use elevators or stair lifts to navigate between floors, while others may need rest breaks after climbing stairs or walking across a building. Hallways and open areas should be wide and obstacle-free.

Accessibility at Work Stations

Some workers may need their desks to be at a certain height. They may use height-adjustable tables or have desks raised on wooden blocks. They may also arrange files or supplies at heights they can reach. Some may avoid high or low drawers or shelves. Workers who use machines may need to operate them from a seated position, with hand controls rather than pedals, or by voice control. Some people may use a telephone with voice activation, large buttons, automatic dialing, a holder for the receiver, or a headset. To help with reading, some workers may use page turners or book holders.

There are many writing and typing devices to assist workers with physical or mobility disabilities. For instance, they may use:

  • Writing grip aids
  • A large-key keyboard
  • Keyguards
  • A one-handed keyboard
  • A touchpad or touchscreen with a stylus
  • An ergonomic keyboard or mouse
  • An adjustable keyboard tray
  • Wrist supports
  • A foot mouse
  • A trackball
  • A joystick
  • Speech recognition software
  • A head pointing system (a device that controls a computer through head or eye movement or facial muscles)
  • A mouthstick

Scheduling Work Hours

Workers may benefit from a variety of scheduling accommodations, such as:

  • A longer work day with lengthened or more frequent breaks
  • A compressed work week
  • Remote work, either permanently or for part of the time

Some workers may have attendants come in at times to assist with personal care needs.

Finally, employers who consider accommodating workers with physical or mobility disabilities will discover a multitude of job candidates eager to exercise their diverse talents for workplaces that make themselves accessible.

 



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