Accessible Customer Service in Ontario and Manitoba


Many separate accessibility standards development processes exist in Canada. Ontario, Manitoba, and Nova Scotia all have laws that mandate creation of provincial accessibility standards. In addition, the Accessible Canada Act mandates accessibility standards that apply to organizations under federal jurisdiction. However, the government of Canada intends to coordinate federal and provincial accessibility laws. Moreover, the third review of the AODA recommends that the Ontario government should support this aim by aligning its accessibility law, the AODA, with the laws of other provinces and the country. If the governments work together to make these laws more similar, the AODA standards development process may change to align with laws in other places across the country. In this article, we will explore accessible customer service in Ontario and Manitoba.

Accessible Customer Service in Ontario and Manitoba

The customer service standards under the AODA and the accessible customer service standard under the Accessibility for Manitobans Act both require service providers to make their goods and services accessible for customers with disabilities. Moreover, both standards require many of the same processes and practices to ensure accessibility. For instance, both standards require service providers in the public and private sectors to:

Differences Between Standards

However, Ontario’s standard requires providers to notify customers about disruptions to any accessible service. In contrast, Manitoba’s standard only requires providers to notify customers about disruptions involving the built environment. In other words, customers in Manitoba may not find out about disruptions to services they need, such as:

Moreover, while both standards apply to providers that offer goods and services, Ontario’s standard also applies to providers that operate facilities.

On the other hand, Manitoba’s standard requires providers to comply with the rules in their customer service policies. In contrast, Ontario’s standard requires providers to create policies, but does not directly state that providers must perform the tasks their policies describe.

In addition, Manitoba’s standard also requires providers to ensure the accessibility of public events, such as:

  • Public meetings
  • Public hearings
  • Consultation processes that the law requires

Under the standard, providers planning or hosting these events must:

  • Hold them in physically accessible locations
  • Ensure that notice of the events appears in accessible formats
  • Meet people’s needs for physical and communication accessibility, upon request
  • Notify the public that people can request accessibility support

In contrast, Ontario’s standard does not designate additional accessibility guidelines for public events. However, a higher degree of accessibility for these events could benefit Ontarians, because these events may have a large impact on the lives of the people who attend.

The customer service standards of the AODA and the Accessibility for Manitobans Act may change over time to improve accessibility. To do so, the standards can exchange best practices, or learn them from standards that develop in other Canadian regions or jurisdictions.




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Improving AODA Compliance in Customer Service


Under the AODA, private or non-profit businesses with twenty to forty-nine (20-49) workers, or fifty (50) or more workers, must complete accessibility reports every three years. The next accessibility reports for private or non-profit businesses were due on December 31st, 2020. However, the Ontario government has extended this deadline. This extended deadline for accessibility reports for private or non-profit businesses is June 30th, 2021. Nonetheless, businesses should use this extra time to assess how compliant they are with AODA standards. Moreover, businesses should also improve their compliance by changing the services they offer so that their businesses are more accessible. In this article, we will outline ways to improve AODA compliance in customer service.

Improving AODA Compliance in Customer Service

Even if businesses are fully compliant with the customer service standards, they can still make changes to their policies and services to enhance accessibility. For instance, some services that businesses could offer include:

In addition, service providers can alert all customers about all accessible features and services they have. For example, businesses can inform customers about the availability and location of physical features, such as:

Likewise, businesses can also tell customers about other accessible services, such as:

Finally, businesses that do not yet offer these features and services can explain how they will meet customers’ needs in other ways, such as:

  • Meeting customers in accessible locations
  • Serving customers by phone or email
  • Alerting customers to information on inaccessible signage

When service providers make customers aware of the accessible services they have, they can start doing business with many more clients.

Enhanced Customer Service Training

Furthermore, businesses can also improve the quality of the customer service training their staff receive. Under the customer service standards, training can take many formats, from basic handouts to more in-depth instruction. When staff receive higher-quality training, they can learn:

High-quality training can also be geared specifically to a business’s services. For instance, restaurant staff could have training that helps them practice:

This practice will allow staff to gain experience serving customers with a variety of disabilities. As a result, businesses can confidently welcome and serve all their customers.




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Assessing AODA Compliance in Customer Service


Under the AODA, private or non-profit businesses with twenty to forty-nine (20-49) workers, or fifty (50) or more workers, must complete accessibility reports every three years. The next accessibility reports for private or non-profit businesses were due on December 31st, 2020. However, the Ontario government has extended this deadline. This extended deadline for accessibility reports for private or non-profit businesses is June 30th, 2021. Nonetheless, businesses should use this extra time to assess how compliant they are with AODA standards. Moreover, businesses should also improve their compliance by changing the services they offer so that their businesses are more accessible. In this article, we will outline ways to assess AODA compliance in customer service.

Assessing AODA Compliance in Customer Service

Businesses that have twenty (20) or more workers and provide customer service need to comply with AODA customer service requirements, including:

In addition, businesses with fifty (50) or more workers need to:

  • Document their customer service policies
  • Have accessibility plans
  • Update policies and plans every five years
  • Keep records of workers’ AODA training

The extended deadline for AODA compliance reports gives staff of businesses more time to assess how well their companies are fulfilling all these requirements.

How to Assess AODA Customer Service Compliance

Companies can start to assess their AODA compliance by requesting anonymous feedback from customers who have needed accessible service. For instance, they can ask customers whether staff interacted with them courteously, in ways that:

  • Respected their dignity and independence
  • Integrated service for customers with and without disabilities, whenever possible
  • Offered equal opportunities to customers with and without disabilities
  • Took their accessibility needs into account

Companies could also ask whether staff:

  • Interacted comfortably and appropriately with their service animal or support person
  • Knew how to find and operate any assistive devices available at the premises
  • Publicized service disruptions and other communications in ways they could access, such as:
  • Responded well to any feedback they offered

If customers have the option to describe their positive or negative encounters with staff, these stories can help staff recognize what they should or should not do when providing accessible service. For example, a customer could describe an incident when staff spoke to their support person instead of directly to them. However, this customer could also explain how staff learned to speak directly to them, instead of about them. Alternatively, another customer could state that staff were not willing to allow their service animal on the premises, and so discriminated against them.

If much of the feedback is negative, it is likely that the business is not compliant with the AODA. As a result, the business will need to make changes, which could include:

  • Improving AODA customer service training
  • Updating policies, plans, or processes

Accessibility Consulting

In addition, businesses could enter short-term or on-going contracts to consult with people who have disabilities. Alternatively, companies could request the services of professional organizations that specialize in assessing accessibility. In either case, an accessibility assessor with lived experience of disability could:

  • Observe and give feedback on the quality of AODA training
  • Comment on the content and accessibility of documents, such as:
    • Customer service policies and plans
    • Feedback processes
    • Notifications of service disruptions

If any of these processes do not comply with AODA requirements, consultants could offer suggestions or assistance. Moreover, consultants could also help companies find resources to support them in strengthening their policies and services.




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AODA Customer Service Training After the COVID-19 Pandemic


As the COVID-19 pandemic progresses, we cheer ourselves by thinking of future socializing in-person. We also think about returning to work or activities we love. These hopes help us through the challenges of physical distancing. Moreover, these challenges show us that we can be more flexible or more creative than we thought we could. For instance, retail stores and other organizations have adapted to physical distancing requirements during the pandemic. Many of these adaptations are also practices that make customer service more accessible for customers with disabilities. In the post-COVID-19 future, more people may recognize the value of adapting service to meet customers’ diverse needs. For example, more service providers may offer high-quality AODA customer service training after the COVID-19 pandemic.

AODA Customer Service Training After the COVID-19 Pandemic

As service providers encourage customers to stay home and contact them remotely, they are changing their ways of doing business. For instance, providers may be:

  • Expanding their businesses online
  • Posting more online flyers or advertisements
  • Communicating more often by phone or email

In addition, service providers are offering more options for:

  • Delivery
  • Pick-up
  • Events or interactions through video-conferencing

In short, service providers have quickly begun to learn and practice new ways of serving and communicating with customers. Moreover, the leaders or supervisors of these organizations have trained their staff to follow new procedures, such as:

  • Requiring customers to maintain physical distancing
  • Supporting customers as they operate technology, such as websites or self-check-outs

In the same way, service providers can adapt just as proactively to provide their staff with high-quality training on best practices for serving customers with disabilities.

Current Requirements for AODA Customer Service Training

Under the Customer Service Standards of the AODA, service providers must teach workers and volunteers how to provide goods and services to customers with disabilities. Training must cover the following topics:

Moreover, providers may train workers using various formats, including:

  • Interactive workshops
  • Classroom settings
  • Online courses
  • handouts

The variety of training options allows providers to create their own training that relates AODA principles to the day-to-day activities in their organizations. For instance, restaurants may receive training on communicating that may include reading menus aloud or taking orders in writing.

However, this variety may create differences in the quality of the training workers receive. For instance, the different possible formats lend themselves to different levels of knowledge. A worker who attends a classroom session on accessibility will talk about course content with other trainees. This worker will likely gain much more understanding than a worker who is given a handout and does not look at it again. Moreover, there is no test requirement or other way of evaluating that a trainee has fully understood what accessibility means in their sector.

Improving Training Quality

Since customers with disabilities are increasing, AODA customer service training must meet these customers’ needs. In the past, service providers may have offered lower-quality training for many reasons, such as:

  • Lack of time
  • Lack of experience with people who have disabilities

However, providers have now succeeded in making the time to train their staff on new COVID-19 protocols. Moreover, leaders and supervisors have overcome their own lack of experience with these new protocols in order to train workers. These leaders and supervisors have researched or consulted experts to develop solutions to the problems the pandemic has posed for their businesses. Therefore, leaders and supervisors can continue to use these strategies in order to offer high-quality AODA customer service training after the COVID-19 pandemic.




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Customer Service After the COVID-19 Pandemic


As the COVID-19 pandemic progresses, we cheer ourselves by thinking of future socializing in-person. We also think about returning to work or activities we love. These hopes help us through the challenges of physical distancing. Moreover, these challenges show us that we can be more flexible or more creative than we thought we could. For instance, retail stores and other organizations have adapted to physical distancing requirements during the pandemic. Many of these adaptations are also practices that make customer service more accessible for customers with disabilities. In the post-COVID-19 future, more people may recognize the value of adapting service to meet customers’ diverse needs. Consequently, more service providers may offer accessible customer service after the COVID-19 pandemic.

Customer Service After the COVID-19 Pandemic

As businesses and other organizations encourage customers to contact them remotely, they are developing new service policies. For instance, some businesses are expanding their presence online. Moreover, they are also offering more options for delivery. For instance, businesses may reduce or waive delivery charges. In addition, they may outline new rules for contactless delivery. Likewise, they may develop ways to remotely provide services they once offered in person. For instance, they may encourage customers to contact them by phone, by email, or through their websites.

Similarly, businesses may create policies about where customers can pick up their purchases while remaining physically distant. Finally, they may make changes to their hours of operation. For example, they may designate certain hours only for seniors and people with disabilities.

Some of these strategies will continue to be useful after the COVID-19 pandemic. For example, flexible options for remote service or delivery will allow companies to do more business with people in distant locations. Likewise, these options make it possible for companies to serve people with disabilities even if their physical premises are not accessible.

Furthermore, businesses that have adapted rapidly to physical distancing may make other changes to improve their service. For example, businesses and other organizations could:

These and other changes make service accessible to more customers. When businesses and other organizations make these changes, they make their services more welcoming to customers of all abilities.




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Creating a More Robust Customer Service Standards in Healthcare


Currently, the AODA does not have a healthcare standard. A committee is making recommendations about what a healthcare standard should include. In the meantime, however, there are still AODA requirements for healthcare providers to follow. The Customer Service Standards have regulations that apply to healthcare providers. When providers follow these requirements, they make healthcare services more accessible to patients, workers, and visitors with disabilities. Customer service standards in healthcare apply to service in:

  • Doctors’ offices
  • Hospitals
  • Walk-in clinics
  • Wellness centres
  • Pharmacies
  • Labs
  • Health Regulating Colleges

Current Customer Service Standards in Healthcare

Under the Customer Service Standards, healthcare providers need to make their goods, services, and facilities accessible to people with disabilities. For instance, providers must:

Stronger Customer Service Standards in Healthcare are Needed

The Customer Service Standards mandate many important requirements for healthcare providers and other organizations to become accessible. However, there are no guidelines advising organizations on how to implement these requirements. For instance, the mandate about training lists the topics that the training needs to address. However, the mandate does not state how providers can educate themselves on these topics to train their employees. In addition, providers can choose types of training that offer different levels of information, such as classroom sessions or handouts. On one hand, this lack of direction can be helpful. For instance, organizations developing their own policies and training can tailor them specifically to their clientele and services. On the other hand, the lack of guidance is harmful when providers have no experience with accessibility.

Accessibility Training

Providers uncomfortable working with patients who have disabilities may not know how to train themselves or their employees. They may easily create brief policies and training modules that do not cover everything they should. When healthcare workers receive little accessibility training, they may think that a patient’s health problem is due to their disability when the two concerns are not connected. For example, a patient who uses a wheelchair may come to the emergency room. Staff with little accessibility training may spend time trying to learn about the patient’s disability instead of diagnosing their health concern.

Moreover, a healthcare worker may not know how to accommodate treatment to a patient’s disability. For instance, a patient with an intellectual disability may have multiple treatment options with different instructions and side effects. Staff might think it best to choose one treatment instead of taking the time to communicate all options in an accessible way.

Thorough accessibility training for all healthcare workers would ensure that all Ontarians have quality care. A healthcare standard should ensure that all Ontarians have equal access to medical practitioners who respect and understand their needs. Therefore, the new healthcare standard should include specific recommendations about what training and policies should include. However, all customer service organizations should show equal respect and understanding for customers with disabilities. Revised Customer Service Standards in healthcare could also benefit from more guidance within the training mandate.



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Accessible Customer Service for Theatres


Under the Customer Service Standards of the AODA, service providers must make their goods, services, and facilities accessible to customers with disabilities. This article will outline accessible customer service for performance venues, such as movie and live theatres. Accessible theatres allow viewers of all abilities to enjoy performances of all kinds together.

Accessible Theatres

Theatres that are accessible show they’re welcome for patrons using assistive devices when they have accessible structural features. Theatres should also have accessible seating at multiple levels. An “accessible seat” can mean different things to different people. For instance, it can mean a seat:

  • Someone can reach without climbing stairs
  • Near the front so that someone can see or hear clearly
  • On one side of the theatre for someone with sight in one eye or hearing in one ear

Training Staff

Theatres must ensure that their staff are trained to interact with patrons who have disabilities. Staff should understand how to communicate with patrons, both in person and remotely. Additionally, staff should know where all the accessible features of their buildings are, including seats offering different kinds of accessibility. Similarly, staff should know about any accessibility equipment or services their locations have. Staff need to be aware of where physical items are stored and if there are any guidelines patrons should follow to borrow them, such as where to return them. Staff who are aware of their locations’ accessibility features can answer patrons’ requests promptly and knowledgeably.

Likewise, staff should know whether services are available for certain events. For instance, staff should be able to tell patrons whether certain movies or performances are captioned or described. In addition, staff of chain theatres or multi-theatre organizations should know if other locations have the features a patron needs, in case the patron would prefer to travel to a location they could use more independently. However, a performance may sometimes be showing only at a location lacking the features a patron needs. In this case, staff should be prepared to find ways to make the patron’s experience as accessible as possible. For instance, if a performance does not have captioning, the theatre could waive the fee for the patron’s companion, who can act as their support person and interpret at the performance.

Tickets and Other Purchases

Moreover, accessible theatres should allow patrons to purchase tickets in multiple ways, such as:

  • By phone or teletypewriter (TTY)
  • In person
  • Online

If a patron finds one way of buying tickets inaccessible, they should be able to buy in another way. In addition, staff should be available to assist patrons purchasing from popcorn concessions or gift-shops.

Advertising

Patrons with disabilities, as well as their loved ones, will want to watch performances together. Therefore, accessible theatres should make the public aware of all the accessibility features and services they offer. For instance, venues can make patrons aware:

  • On signs
  • In person
  • Through their websites
  • Remotely, through messages on their automated phone-answering systems

Moreover, venues’ websites can explain how to access features, equipment, or services. For example:

  • Which performances have captioning or description
  • Where accessible parking, entrances, and washrooms are
  • Which seats are wheelchair accessible
  • Whether patrons need to book accessible seats or parking in advance, and how to do so
  • Whether theatres waive or reduce prices of support persons’ tickets

Contact Information

Finally, accessible theatres should provide multiple contact methods for patrons to get in touch with them, including:

  • Phone and teletypewriter (TTY) numbers
  • Email addresses
  • Accessible websites, including performance listings, ticket purchase, and contact forms

Accessible theatres can come in different forms. Our next articles will outline different accessibility features for movie and live theatres.



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Providing Accessible Customer Service in Person


Under the Customer Service Standards of the AODA, service providers must make their goods, services, and facilities accessible to customers with disabilities. Many of these guidelines focus on accessible customer service in person. For instance, providers must:

  • Train staff to interact with customers who have disabilities
  • Welcome customers with:
  • Provide accessible information
  • Notify the public about service disruptions
  • Address accessibility feedback

Providing Accessible Customer Service in Person

Communication

Staff providing accessible customer service in person should be comfortable communicating with customers in a variety of ways. Providers can serve customers in American Sign Language (ASL) if they hire some staff who sign. Customers may also communicate by:

  • Writing
  • Speaking
  • Speechreading
  • Using communication devices
  • Using and understanding plain language, rather than figures of speech
  • Understanding descriptions, with directions like “left” and “right”, rather than gestures or phrases like “over there”

Moreover, staff should also:

  • Speak clearly, at a natural pace and volume
  • Give customers time to express themselves instead of trying to finish sentences for them

If a staff member has not understood what a customer has said, they should state what they think the customer has said and ask if they have understood correctly. If a customer has not understood what a staff member has said, the staff member should try to rephrase instead of repeating exactly what they said before.

Structural Features and Equipment

Staff offering accessible customer service in person should be aware of any accessible structural features their locations have. Staff need to know where these features of their buildings are so that they can direct customers to them. Similarly, staff should know about any accessibility equipment or services their locations have. Additionally, staff need to be aware of where physical items are stored and if there are any guidelines customers should follow to borrow them, such as where to return them. Likewise, staff should know whether services are available on certain days or times, or whether a customer can arrange service at a convenient time. Staff who are aware of their locations’ accessibility features can answer customers’ requests promptly and knowledgeably.

Furthermore, when locations do not have the features or equipment that a customer needs, staff should find other ways to make their premises accessible. For instance, a theatre may provide captioning or ASL interpretation but only at certain performances. If a customer cannot attend a play at a pre-scheduled captioned or ASL showing, the theatre could waive the fee for the customer’s companion, who can act as their support person and interpret at the event. In another example, a store may have large-print signs but not Braille ones indicating where washrooms are. If a customer does not read print, staff could guide them to the washroom or provide a detailed description of exactly where it is.

In addition, staff of chain organizations should know if other locations have the features a customer needs, in case the customer would prefer to travel to a location they could use more independently. However, the customer may want or need to receive service at the less accessible location, so staff should be prepared to find ways to meet the customer’s needs.

Accessible Payment Options

Moreover, staff providing accessible customer service in person should know whether credit and debit machines are accessible. If machines have buttons, staff may need to explain which buttons are which. If machines are touch-screen based and have no speech output, some customers will need to pay in a different way, such as by cash or cheque.

Advertising Accessible Services

Finally, staff should tell all customers what their accessible services are. Customers may not be aware that a provider has accessible elements until a staff member points them out. If staff tell every customer about accessible service at their location, they create a more inclusive service model. They ensure that every customer with a disability has the information they need, not just every customer with a visible disability. Moreover, staff will provide valuable information to non-disabled customers, who may recommend organizations providing accessible customer service in person to friends or family members with disabilities.



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Accessible Information in Customer Service


Under the Customer Service Standards of the AODA, providers must make documentation about their accessibility available to customers with disabilities upon request. This part of the Standards applies to all public sector organizations, and private sector organizations with twenty or more workers. These service providers must offer accessible information in customer service.

Accessible Information in Customer Service

Service providers need to create written versions of their customer service policies. They must outline their procedures on how they will:

Customers may sometimes request a copy of any of these documents in an accessible format.

For example, some accessible formats that customers may request are:

  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Online on an accessible website

Likewise, customers may need communication supports. For instance, they may request:

  • Reading aloud
  • Plain language

While some customers may request a certain format or support, others may list a few formats or supports they can use so that the provider can choose one. Providers must consult with the customer to find out what format(s) or support(s) will work best for them. Then, the provider must produce the document in that format or with that support. If a provider cannot produce the document themselves, they must arrange for another provider to create it for them. Providers must make documentation available in a timely manner, and for no higher cost than they would charge a non-disabled customer for the document in its original format.

Accessible Information Online

Service providers must also work on making any information on their websites accessible. The Information and Communications Standards of the AODA mandate that all Ontario public sector organizations, and all private sector organizations with fifty or more workers, must make their websites accessible by 2021. Organizations with twenty to forty-nine workers may also choose to champion web accessibility. To do so, organizations must comply with Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0, Level AA. This international standard gives web developers guidelines on how to make their webpages accessible to computer users with disabilities.

Other Types of Accessible Information

In addition to accessible documentation and websites, providers must make many other kinds of information available to customers with disabilities. The Information and Communications Standards mandate that providers must offer any information they produce in accessible formats or with communication supports upon request. For instance, types of information that customers might request are:

  • Lectures or presentations
  • Movies or other videos at theatres or screenings
  • Surveys
  • Pamphlets advertising sales or services
  • Bills and receipts
  • Restaurant menus
  • Event programs
  • Bank statements
  • Educational or library materials

Some accessible formats and communication supports that customers may request, in addition to the ones listed above, are:

  • Sign language interpretation
  • Captioning
  • Descriptive video
  • Contact by email instead of by phone

Accessible information in customer service enables all customers to know the same things about what providers offer. Accessibility also ensures that all customers can do business or take part in leisure activities in their communities.

 



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Computer Accessibility in Customer Service


The Customer Service Standards of the AODA gives service providers guidelines on making their goods, services, and facilities accessible to customers with disabilities. Some of these services will involve computer accessibility. For instance, service providers need to make their websites accessible. They can do so by ensuring that their webpages are compatible with the hardware and software people use on their personal devices, such as computers or phones. In addition, some organizations, such as libraries, schools, restaurants, or retailers, may have computers or tablets with accessible hardware or software on-site for patrons to use. In this article, we describe some ways that customers with disabilities use technology.

Computer Accessibility 

Hardware

Accessible hardware devices connect to computers or phones and allow people to input and receive information in different ways. People may use different kinds of keyboards, such as one-handed or large-key keyboards. Key guards are frames that fit over a keyboard with a hole for each key. This set-up ensures that users type only one key at a time. The following allows users to type in comfortable positions or change positions when they need to:

  • Ergonomic keyboards
  • Wrist supports
  • Adjustable keyboard trays
  • Other positioning devices 

Some people use different kinds of pointing devices, instead of traditional mice. Trackballs are larger than traditional mice, and people can operate them with their thumbs, palms, or feet as well as their fingers. Other alternative mice include touch pads or screens, light pens, joysticks, head pointers, or mouth sticks. Some people may also use these devices, or eye-tracking systems, as alternatives for keyboards as well as mice. In contrast, other people may use certain keys on their keyboards to perform tasks usually completed by clicking a mouse.

Large monitors allow people who read large print to access more information at a time. In contrast, Braille displays present the screen’s contents in Braille. People may also print in Braille using Braille embossers.

Accessible Software

Accessible software programs also affect how people can input and receive information. On-screen keyboards allow users to type by selecting letters, numbers, or symbols with their pointing devices. Speech recognition software allows users to control the computer or phone with their voices. Predictive software helps users input words by displaying word options they can choose from after they have typed the first few letters.

People may use screen magnification software to enlarge information on their screens, or use screen reader software that reads information aloud.

These types of software are often available through various programs. Many programs are built for different types of computers, such as Windows or Mac. Some programs are built into operating systems or browsers, while others are third-party software that users purchase from companies specializing in accessible hardware and software. Programs sometimes offer different levels of accessibility. For instance, some programs that read aloud read more information than others. Therefore, different people will find certain programs more valuable or necessary than others, depending on what their needs are.

When individuals or organizations want to invest in accessible computer equipment, they should consult people with disabilities. They will be able to advise them about what devices or programs they might find most useful. Moreover, organizations should also consult some venders, who can tell them about other devices and programs that their clientele has not had the chance to work with before but might find useful. Funding may be available to help organizations offset the cost of some equipment.

Training Staff

Finally, organizations must ensure that their staff have training on how to use accessible computers and the hardware and software that goes along with it. Staff may need to troubleshoot if hardware or software malfunction. Moreover, if people are using a device or program for the first time, staff may need to help them learn the basics.

Computer accessibility gives everyone an equal chance to take part in a world that is becoming more and more digital.



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