The Accessible Canada Act Comes into Force Today – Download and Read the Legislation in English or French – AODA Alliance


Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update

United for a Barrier-Free Society for All People with Disabilities

www.aodaalliance.org [email protected] Twitter: @aodaalliance

The Accessible Canada Act Comes into Force Today – Download and Read the Legislation in English or French

July 11, 2019

          SUMMARY

Today, the Federal Government proclaimed the Accessible Canada Act in force. It was recently passed by the House of Commons and Senate and was given Royal Assent. The law comes into force when the Federal Cabinet so orders. In a news release earlier today, set out below, the Cabinet proclaimed it in force.

The Federal Government’s news release makes commitments on what this law will do. we will be vigilant to hold the Federal Government to any and all of its commitments. For example, in its news release, the Federal Government promises:

“With this legislation in place, millions of Canadians with disabilities can rely on the Government of Canada to remove the barriers that hinder their full participation in society.”

Would you like to read the Accessible Canada Act in its final form? At last, we just recently received from Parliament electronic copies of the finalized wording of the law in English and French. You can get these in MS Word or pdf format by visiting https://www.aodaalliance.org/canada/download-the-final-text-of-the-accessible-canada-act-as-passed-by-canadas-parliament-previously-called-bill-c-81-in-english-or-french-and-in-an-accessible-ms-word-or-a-pdf-format/

We also invite you to read the AODA Alliance ‘s 7 preliminary reflections we recently made about the final enactment of the Accessible Canada Act.

Since it is now a law, we no longer call it Bill C-81. A bill is a proposed law, that has not yet become a law.

Watch for future AODA Alliance Updates where we will map out our next steps in our campaign to ensure that this new legislation is effectively implemented.

          MORE DETAILS

Text of the Federal Government’s July 11, 2019 News Release

Originally posted at https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/news/2019/07/canadas-first-federal-accessibility-legislation-comes-into-force.html

Employment and Social Development Canada

Canada’s first federal accessibility legislation comes into force

News release

July 11, 2019             Gatineau, Quebec              Employment and Social Development Canada

Accessibility in Canada is about creating communities, workplaces and services that enable everyone to participate fully in society without barriers. The Government of Canada believes that all Canadians deserve the same opportunities and chances at success and is pleased to announce the coming into force of the Accessible Canada Act. Reaching this milestone demonstrates the Government’s commitment to implement this transformational legislation in a timely manner, creating more opportunities for persons with disabilities and ensuring greater access for all Canadians.

The coming into force of the Accessible Canada Act establishes a framework to create a barrier-free Canada through the proactive identification, removal and prevention of accessibility barriers. It will also ensure that persons with disabilities are no longer required to fight barriers to accessibility on an individual basis. With this legislation in place, millions of Canadians with disabilities can rely on the Government of Canada to remove the barriers that hinder their full participation in society.

The Accessible Canada Act applies to the federally regulated private sector, which includes the banking, transportation and telecommunications sectors, as well as the Government of Canada, Crown corporations and Parliament. Under the Act, these organizations will be required to develop and publish accessibility plans that describe how they will identify, remove and prevent barriers to accessibility. They will also be required to establish a mechanism for receiving and addressing feedback on accessibility from anyone who interacts with their organization. Finally, they will have to develop regular progress reports on the implementation of their plan and addressing any feedback they receive.

The Accessible Canada Act also establishes new structures and positions, including:

  • the Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization (CASDO), led by a board of directors comprised of a majority of persons with disabilities that will develop accessibility standards in collaboration with the disability community and industry;
  • a Chief Accessibility Officer, who will advise the Minister of Accessibility and monitor systemic and emerging accessibility issues; and
  • an Accessibility Commissioner, who will spearhead compliance and enforcement activities under the legislation.

The next phase of implementation will include the development of standards and regulations that will provide clear guidance on accessibility requirements.

The new legislation is built on a whole-of-government approach to accessibility. Existing regulators and complaints bodies—such as the Canadian Transportation Agency, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, the Canadian Human Rights Commission and the Federal Public Sector Labour Relations and Employment Board—are required to collaborate to put in place a mechanism for the efficient and expeditious referral of accessibility-related complaints and to foster complementary accessibility policies and practices.

The coming into force of the Accessible Canada Act also legislates National AccessAbility Week as beginning each year on the last Sunday in May, with the objective of promoting accessibility and celebrating the contributions of persons with disabilities across the country.

Quotes

“Today marks a major milestone in the history of disability rights. I am so proud that the Accessible Canada Act has now come into force and is a reality. This important achievement would not have been possible without the dedication and engagement of the disability community and I thank them for their hard work. With this legislation now in place, we can begin a journey that will lead us to a society that treats all people with the dignity they deserve. Now more than ever, we can say: Nothing without us!”

– The Honourable Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Public Services and Procurement and Accessibility

Quick facts

  • Approximately one in five Canadians, or about 6.2 million people aged 15 and over, report having a disability that limits them in their daily activities.
  • The Accessible Canada Act was developed following the most inclusive and accessible consultations with the disability community in our country’s history. More than 6,000 Canadians and 100 accessibility organizations shared their views and ideas about an accessible Canada.

Contacts

For media enquiries, please contact:

Marielle Hossack

Press Secretary

Office of the Honourable Carla Qualtrough

819-956-3239

[email protected]

Media Relations Office

Employment and Social Development Canada

819-994-5559

[email protected]



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The Accessible Canada Act Comes into Force Today


Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update United for a Barrier-Free Society for All People with Disabilities http://www.aodaalliance.org [email protected] Twitter: @aodaalliance

July 11, 2019

SUMMARY

Today, the Federal Government proclaimed the Accessible Canada Act in force. It was recently passed by the House of Commons and Senate and was given Royal Assent. The law comes into force when the Federal Cabinet so orders. In a news release earlier today, set out below, the Cabinet proclaimed it in force.

The Federal Government’s news release makes commitments on what this law will do. we will be vigilant to hold the Federal Government to any and all of its commitments. For example, in its news release, the Federal Government promises:

“With this legislation in place, millions of Canadians with disabilities can rely on the Government of Canada to remove the barriers that hinder their full participation in society.”

Would you like to read the Accessible Canada Act in its final form? At last, we just recently received from Parliament electronic copies of the finalized wording of the law in English and French. You can get these in MS Word or pdf format by visiting https://www.aodaalliance.org/canada/download-the-final-text-of-the-accessible-canada-act-as-passed-by-canadas-parliament-previously-called-bill-c-81-in-english-or-french-and-in-an-accessible-ms-word-or-a-pdf-format/

We also invite you to read the AODA Alliance ‘s 7 preliminary reflections we recently made about the final enactment of the Accessible Canada Act.

Since it is now a law, we no longer call it Bill C-81. A bill is a proposed law, that has not yet become a law.

Watch for future AODA Alliance Updates where we will map out our next steps in our campaign to ensure that this new legislation is effectively implemented.

MORE DETAILS

Text of the Federal Government’s July 11, 2019 News Release

Originally posted at https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/news/2019/07/canadas-first-federal-accessibility-legislation-comes-into-force.html

Employment and Social Development Canada

Canadas first federal accessibility legislation comes into force

News release
July 11, 2019 Gatineau, Quebec Employment and Social Development Canada

Accessibility in Canada is about creating communities, workplaces and services that enable everyone to participate fully in society without barriers. The Government of Canada believes that all Canadians deserve the same opportunities and chances at success and is pleased to announce the coming into force of the Accessible Canada Act. Reaching this milestone demonstrates the Governments commitment to implement this transformational legislation in a timely manner, creating more opportunities for persons with disabilities and ensuring greater access for all Canadians.

The coming into force of the Accessible Canada Act establishes a framework to create a barrier-free Canada through the proactive identification, removal and prevention of accessibility barriers. It will also ensure that persons with disabilities are no longer required to fight barriers to accessibility on an individual basis. With this legislation in place, millions of Canadians with disabilities can rely on the Government of Canada to remove the barriers that hinder their full participation in society.

The Accessible Canada Act applies to the federally regulated private sector, which includes the banking, transportation and telecommunications sectors, as well as the Government of Canada, Crown corporations and Parliament. Under the Act, these organizations will be required to develop and publish accessibility plans that describe how they will identify, remove and prevent barriers to accessibility. They will also be required to establish a mechanism for receiving and addressing feedback on accessibility from anyone who interacts with their organization. Finally, they will have to develop regular progress reports on the implementation of their plan and addressing any feedback they receive.

The Accessible Canada Act also establishes new structures and positions, including:

the Canadian Accessibility Standards Development Organization (CASDO), led by a board of directors comprised of a majority of persons with disabilities that will develop accessibility standards in collaboration with the disability community and industry;
a Chief Accessibility Officer, who will advise the Minister of Accessibility and monitor systemic and emerging accessibility issues; and
an Accessibility Commissioner, who will spearhead compliance and enforcement activities under the legislation.

The next phase of implementation will include the development of standards and regulations that will provide clear guidance on accessibility requirements.

The new legislation is built on a whole-of-government approach to accessibility. Existing regulators and complaints bodiessuch as the Canadian Transportation Agency, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, the Canadian Human Rights Commission and the Federal Public Sector Labour Relations and Employment Boardare required to collaborate to put in place a mechanism for the efficient and expeditious referral of accessibility-related complaints and to foster complementary accessibility policies and practices.

The coming into force of the Accessible Canada Act also legislates National AccessAbility Week as beginning each year on the last Sunday in May, with the objective of promoting accessibility and celebrating the contributions of persons with disabilities across the country.

Quotes

Today marks a major milestone in the history of disability rights. I am so proud that the Accessible Canada Act has now come into force and is a reality. This important achievement would not have been possible without the dedication and engagement of the disability community and I thank them for their hard work. With this legislation now in place, we can begin a journey that will lead us to a society that treats all people with the dignity they deserve. Now more than ever, we can say: Nothing without us!
The Honourable Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Public Services and Procurement and Accessibility

Quick facts

Approximately one in five Canadians, or about 6.2 million people aged 15 and over, report having a disability that limits them in their daily activities.

The Accessible Canada Act was developed following the most inclusive and accessible consultations with the disability community in our countrys history. More than 6,000 Canadians and 100 accessibility organizations shared their views and ideas about an accessible Canada.

Contacts

For media enquiries, please contact:
Marielle Hossack
Press Secretary
Office of the Honourable Carla Qualtrough
819-956-3239
[email protected]

Media Relations Office
Employment and Social Development Canada
819-994-5559
[email protected]



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Download the final text of the Accessible Canada Act, as passed by Canada’s Parliament, previously called Bill C-81, in English or French, and in an accessible MS Word or a pdf format



Click here to download the English version of the Accessible Canada Act in MS Word format. Click here to down load the English version of the Accessible Canada Act in pdf format. Click here to download the French version of the Accessible Canada Act in an accessible MS Word format. Click here to download the … Continue reading Download the final text of the Accessible Canada Act, as passed by Canada’s Parliament, previously called Bill C-81, in English or French, and in an accessible MS Word or a pdf format



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New Look for 100+ Year Old Library in North End Comes with Accessible Features


The newly renovated St. John’s Library opened on Friday, with upgrades that include an accessible entrance and a literacy playground. CTV News Winnipeg
Published Friday, July 5, 2019

A library in Winnipeg’s North End reopened Friday following two years of upgrades that helped to enhance the building’s accessibility.

The St. John’s Library, which originally opened on June 2, 1915, now has an accessible entrance and washroom, as well as a lift.

“Congratulations to St. John’s Library on your re-opening; I am delighted to know that Government of Canada programs like the Enabling Accessibility Fund have helped you showcase your commitment to removing barriers to accessibility and inclusion for all Canadians who find joy, wonder and excitement in reading and lifelong learning,” said Canadian Minister of Public Services and Procurement and Accessibility Carla Qualtrough in a news release.

St. John’s Library Renovation
As part of the renovations, the St. John’s Library now has a 943 square foot addition with a reading area.

The $2.8-million renovation also went to a redesign of the main floor and lower level, a 24-hour book return, two tutorial rooms, two program rooms, renovated washrooms, as well as a 943 square foot addition with a reading area.

The St. John’s Library is a designated heritage building, so the original features were maintained and refurbished during the renovations, which also included new shelving, furniture, and a family literacy playground.

“It’s always exciting to see the results of renovations and we’re thrilled to see the upgraded St. John’s Library reopening to the benefit of this community,” said Mayor Brian Bowman.

The funds for the renovation came from all three levels of government and public support.

Original at https://winnipeg.ctvnews.ca/new-look-for-100-year-old-library-in-north-end-comes-with-accessible-features-1.4495522



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Accessible Service in Sports Venues


Under the Customer Service Standards of the AODA, service providers must make their goods, services, and facilities accessible to customers with disabilities. Our last article outlined accessible information in sports venues, such as arenas and stadiums. In this article, we cover best practices for accessible service in sports venues. In particular, we look at how staff can find ways to make their premises welcoming to fans who need accessible features that a venue does not have yet.

Accessible Service in Sports Venues

Service Animals, Support Persons,  and Assistive Devices

Accessible sports venues must welcome all guests who enter with assistive devices, support persons, or service animals. Service animals are legally permitted in all areas open to the public, including areas where fans buy or consume food. Venues should work with fans who have service animals to book seats with room for the animals. Similarly, if arenas or stadiums choose to waive or reduce fees for support-person tickets, they should advertise this pricing.

Training Staff

Venues must ensure that their staff are trained to interact with fans who have disabilities. Staff should understand how to communicate with fans, both in person and remotely. Additionally, staff should know where all the accessible features of their buildings or outdoor amenities are, including seats offering different kinds of accessibility. For instance, a fan with a visual impairment might want to book a front seat on the left side of the stadium. However, this fan may not be able to access the stadium’s online seating map. In this case, the fan may choose to book by phone so that a staff member can assist them.

Communication Support Awareness

Similarly, staff should know about any communication supports their locations offer. For example, staff should know whether certain games or concerts will be available with:

  • American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation
  • Closed or open captioning
  • Assistive listening devices
  • Live description

Moreover, staff should know which equipment is used for which service, where it is stored, and how to trouble-shoot when it malfunctions.

If venues cannot offer some or all of these services, staff can still offer fans an accessible experience. For instance, if a venue cannot offer live description for games, it can waive the ticket fee for companions of fans with visual disabilities. A companion can act as a support person and give a verbal play-by-play of the game.

Finally, accessible service in sports venues involves welcoming amateur and professional athletes with disabilities. Arenas and stadiums should seek out and host players and teams with disabilities. Our next set of articles will cover a few sports programs for athletes with disabilities. Programs range from recreational to competitive. Athletes with disabilities participate in summer and winter sports on the local, national, and international levels.



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Accessible Information in Sports Venues


Under the Customer Service Standards of the AODA, service providers must make their goods, services, and facilities accessible to customers with disabilities. Our last article outlined accessible features in sports venues, such as arenas and stadiums. This article will cover best practices for providing accessible information in sports venues.

Accessible Information in Sports Venues

Accessible Websites

Fans can use accessible computers or phones to read websites that follow Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0. More fans can find out about venues’ features, events, and services if venues post them on websites that are accessible. For instance, they should post:

  • What games or concerts they will be hosting
  • What accessible structural features they have, and where these features are located
  • Whether they offer any communication supports for games or concerts

Signage

Moreover, signage is also important. Whether signs are large ones outside the venue or small ones on seat numbers, they should:

  • Include detailed information for fans with hearing disabilities
  • Use clear language or pictures for fans with intellectual disabilities
  • Be at eye level for fans at wheelchair and standing heights
  • Have large print and good colour contrast for fans with visual impairments
  • Include Braille for fans who are blind

Communication Supports

Furthermore, sports venues can also offer communication supports to make games or concerts more accessible for fans with sensory disabilities. For instance, when hosting concerts, venues can offer:

  • American Sign Language (ASL) interpretation
  • closed or open captioning
  • Assistive listening devices

Alternatively, for sports events, venues can offer live description of what is happening on the field, court, or ice.

Moreover, venue websites should explain how to access communication supports. For example:

  • Which performances will be interpreted or captioned
  • Which games will be described
  • Whether fans can request additional interpretation, captioning, or description
  • Where to pick up and return assistive listening devices, closed-captioning mirrors, or description headsets

Accessible information in sports venues ensures that all guests have equal opportunities to access services. Our next article will discuss how sports venues can provide an accessible service experience.



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Ensuring Accessible Content for All Students


By Steven M. Baule
June 24th, 2019

There are four major areas educators can check to ensure digital materials include accessible content for all students

This summer, many faculty will work on developing or revising curricular content for their courses. One of the keys in developing new digital materials is verifying that those materials offer accessible content for all students.

Today, most learning management systems (LMS) and software programs offer some level of accessibility compliance checking. However, they are not always thorough or error-free.

For instance, some PowerPoint templates show less-than-ideal contrast between text and background colors. Many YouTube videos include closed captioning, but the automatic captioning often leaves something to be desired. Taking the time to review accessibility of materials makes sense to ensure all students can experience success instead of frustration.

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 are a checklist of items to consider in developing accessible websites or other digital documents. The WCAG 2.0 guidelines were published in 2008, so they are well established. Unfortunately, they are not well implemented. WCAG 2.0 has three levels of compliance from least to most restrictive: Level A, Level AA, and Level AAA. Level AAA is considered to be difficult for some new technologies to embrace immediately, so Level AA is considered an acceptable standard for digital resources. W3C, which is the entity responsible for issuing the WCAG 2.0 guidelines, maintains a listing of compliance tools for evaluating websites. The list also includes tools to check the compliance against the federal Access Board’s Section 508 standards and those of several other nations. Google provides a web development tool called Lighthouse that offers performance and accessibility audits.

WebAIM did an analysis of the top 1 million websites earlier this year. They used WCAG 2.0 Level A/AAthe lower two levels of complianceand estimated that less than 1 percent or so of commonly accessed websites conform to WCAG 2.0 Level AA. They found on average 59.6 average accessibility errors per page. According to WebAIM, users with disabilities should expect to encounter an error on 1 of every 13 HTML elements with which they interact. A complete summary of the results is available at https://webaim.org/projects/million/#errors.

Four common barriers to accessible content for all students

The four most prevalent issues identified by WebAIM’s study were items lacking contrast, missing alternative text tags for images, empty or broken links, and missing form labels. Eighty-five percent of homepages have issues with presenting low contrast text. Nearly 68 percent of pages were missing alternative text for images. More than half of the websites included empty links or missing form labels.

Two great tools for checking the contrast ratio of text and its background are WebAIM’s Color Contrast Checker and Contrast-ratio.com. As a reminder, WCAG 2.0 Level AA asks for a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1 for regular text and 3:1 for large text. Level AAA asks for 7:1 of higher ratio for regular text and 4.5:1 for large text. Muzli has an excellent in-depth article on the science of color design. If you don’t want to stay with black text on a white background, stay with the tried and true color combinations used on informational road signs, white on blue and black on yellow. The reverse of those schemes are equally effective.

Ensuring the alt text tags are not missing is another important topic both for websites and documents included informational images. SEO Site Checkup has a simple Image Alt Test scanner for any URL. Screamingfrog has a good article on how identify those missing alt text tags. Adobe has excellent help resources to help users create and verify PDF accessibility. Microsoft Office provides similar help to create accessible MS Office documents.

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Most LMSs and other web tools include link verification tools to assist in ensuring there are no broken or empty links on a website. However, with the fluid nature of the web, links break constantly. Additionally, some links created by Java script are difficult for those with disabilities to access. Links to other formats, like pdfs and docx files should include those identifications within the link text, so users except that file type. WebAIM includes a detailed article on links and hypertext. As an example, CANVAS’s support for error checking is linked. Brightspace/D2L has a process for resolving broken links as well.

Ensuring form labels is not a consideration for most digital documents, but it is for web documents and some Adobe Acrobat documents as well. Google provides four ways to provide labels to every element in a web-based from. Adobe support for labeling forms is available as well.

Although there are other potential accessibility issues with websites and digital documents, addressing the four most common issues identified above will go a long way towards improving accessible content for all students.

Original at https://www.eschoolnews.com/2019/06/24/ensuring-accessible-content-for-all-students/?all



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Accessible Sports Venues


Under the Customer Service Standards of the AODA, service providers must make their goods, services, and facilities accessible to customers with disabilities. This article will outline features that accessible sports venues, such as arenas and stadiums, should have. Accessible sports venues allow fans of all abilities to enjoy different kinds of sports together.

Accessible Sports Venues

Venues show their welcome for fans using assistive devices when they have accessible structural features. For instance, some accessible structural features that venues might have are:

  • Accessible Parking
  • Ramped or level entrances
  • Automatic doors and wide doorways
  • Lifts or elevators whenever there are stairs
  • Accessible public washrooms
  • Accessible change rooms for athletes or performers
  • Wide aisles and paths of travel
  • Visual fire alarms
  • Line areas and service counters that accommodate fans using mobility devices

Other features can also help venues become more accessible. For instance, good lighting will help fans who are Deaf communicate visually. Lighting is also important for fans who are visually impaired. Moreover, additional seating may benefit some fans with invisible physical disabilities who cannot stand in long lines.

Tickets and Other Purchases

Moreover, accessible sports venues should allow fans to purchase tickets in multiple ways, such as:

  • By phone or teletypewriter (TTY)
  • In person
  • Online

If a fan finds one way of buying tickets inaccessible, they should be able to buy in another way. In addition, staff should be available to assist fans purchasing from concessions or gift-shops.

Accessible Seating

Venues should also have accessible seating at multiple levels. An “accessible seat” can mean different things to different people. For instance, it can mean a seat:

  • Someone can reach without climbing stairs
  • Near the front so that someone can see or hear clearly
  • On one side of the arena or stadium, for someone with sight in one eye or hearing in one ear

Advertising

Fans with disabilities, as well as their loved ones, will want to watch games together. Therefore, accessible arenas and stadiums should make the public aware of all the accessibility features and services they offer. For instance, venues can make fans aware:

  • On signs
  • In person
  • Through their websites
  • Remotely, through messages on their automated phone-answering systems

Moreover, websites can explain how to access features, equipment, or services. For example:

  • Where accessible parking, entrances, and washrooms are
  • Which seats are wheelchair accessible
  • Whether fans need to book accessible seats or parking in advance, and how to do so

Contact Information

In addition, accessible sports venues should provide multiple contact methods for fans to get in touch with them, including:

  • Phone and teletypewriter (TTY) numbers
  • Email addresses
  • Accessible websites, including performance listings, ticket purchase, and contact forms

Our next article will cover accessible information in sports venues.



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Providing Accessible Service in Amusement Parks


Under the Customer Service Standards of the AODA, service providers must make their goods, services, and facilities accessible to customers with disabilities. Our last article outlined accessible information in amusement parks. In this article, we cover best practices for accessible service in amusement parks. In particular, we look at how staff can find ways to make their premises welcoming to clients who need accessible features that an amusement park does not have yet.

Providing Accessible Service in Amusement Parks

Service Animals, Support Persons,  and Assistive Devices

Parks must welcome all guests who enter with assistive devices, support persons, or service animals. If parks choose to waive or reduce fees for support-person tickets, they should advertise this pricing. Service animals are legally permitted in all areas open to the public, including dining areas. Park staff and websites should alert guests to the locations of all nearby service animal relief areas.

Structural Features

If parks have any accessible structural features, staff should know what and where they are. For example, staff should know where guests can find accessible parking, entrances, and washrooms.

Staff Assistance

Furthermore, parks must train their staff to interact with guests who have disabilities. Training should show staff how to help guests access their services if their grounds or buildings lack the features those guests need. Staff should understand how to communicate with guests, both in person and remotely.

In addition, staff members should be available to greet guests and ask if they need any assistance. In this way, they can make guests aware that they are willing to provide services if their parks lack certain amenities. For instance, if guests cannot read signs, staff should be able to direct them to the areas or attractions they want to reach.

Similarly, staff should know which kinds of assistive devices guests can bring with them on rides. For example, staff should know whether a guest can ride with their own:

  • Wheelchair
  • Scooter
  • Walker
  • Crutches
  • Cane

If a guest cannot ride with their own device, staff should know whether a guest can:

  • Approach the ride with the device but ride without it
  • Transfer from large devices into on-site devices or ride seats

Staff should also return riders’ devices to them as soon as possible. For instance, riders who entered a ride using a device may need to have the device back in order to exit the ride. Some guests might bring a support person to help them perform any or all of these tasks. However, parks should not require that a guest has a support person with them.

Accessible Format Awareness

When parks offer accessible versions of hard-copy print, such as pamphlets, guides, maps, or other documents, staff need to be aware of:

  • What information is available in what format(s)
  • Where hard copies are kept 
  • Whether hard-copy Braille or large print versions can be created upon request
  • How clients can find web versions
  • Whether alternate-format versions are up-to-date

Staff should know the differences between a current printed version of a document and the version a guest can read. For example, staff can keep a printed list of the differences clipped to the Braille version of a document. They can then let the guest know what the differences are.

If a document is not available in any of the formats a guest can use, staff should read the document to the guest. If it is a form, staff should fill it in according to the guest’s directions.

Communication Support Awareness

Similarly, when parks provide communication supports for performances or other interactions, staff should know:

  • What supports are available for what kinds of interaction
  • Where on-site communication devices are stored, and best practices for serving guests using them
  • Whether plain-language versions of documents are available and how to access them
  • How to arrange Sign language interpretation
  • How far in advance arrangements should be made

Accessible service in amusement parks ensures that all guests can have fun with their families and friends.



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