BourneFlosman: Carleton University Isn’t Living Up to Its Accessibility Pledge


How is it, in 2021, that ableism is still a systemic issue at a Canadian institution of higher learning?

Author of the article:Ben BourneFlosman
Publishing date:Sep 17, 2021

Carleton University student Ben BourneFlosman has been unable to attend his first year of university in person because of limits on the institution’s support for disabled students on campus.

It was April of 2019 when I first got a glimpse inside Carleton University: my father’s alma mater, and a place well-known for its disability support programs. I have Spinal Muscular Atrophy, which is a neuromuscular disease that causes me to use a wheelchair due to its negative effects on my nerves and muscles.

Back in 2019, I was told that I would be able to access personal support worker assistance provided by the University 24/7 as a student. I require support like this for assistance with essential personal care. Needless to say, I was sold.

However, this year, on May 10, after accepting my offer for a BA Honours in political science, I received an email from the Attendant Services Program (Carleton’s support program that provides PSWs for its students) stating that “in consultation with Ottawa Public Health, the university has decided to delay the resumption of the Attendant Services Program” until the potential restart of the program in January 2022.

This program provides a service I cannot live without. Following my appeals, the university confirmed a few weeks ago that I cannot live on campus because of the “unique needs of the (Attendant Services Program), the current pandemic, and public health and safety requirements.”

Carleton is still providing me with an academic education, albeit online. Unfortunately, the university experience is composed of more than just class. It is extremely disheartening to watch as my able-bodied peers enter campus and embark on a part of life that is defined by independence, belonging to a community, and autonomy. It is this broader learning of life that I do not have access to.

Carleton’s own website repeats its mandate (echoing similar post-secondary policies) that “all members of the Carleton community” must be fully vaccinated by Oct. 15. As well, the university opened its indoor gyms and athletic facilities in July.

There is a disconnect that Carleton University will permit indoor gatherings and access to the residences for its able-bodied students while denying the same access to students with disabilities who require care by medical professionals that are affiliated with the university (and subject to its vaccination requirements). How does this situation reflect the university’s commitment to “being the most accessible campus in Canada” (as stated on its website)?

How is it, in 2021, that ableism is still a systemic issue at a Canadian university? Carleton University’s own Human Rights Policies and Procedures states “Carleton University is committed to providing access to the educational experience and accommodation to the point of undue hardship in order to promote academic accessibility for individuals with identified and duly assessed disabilities.” My question for “Canada’s most accessible campus” is simple: At what point does treating students with disabilities with the same dignity as those who are able-bodied go beyond being an undue hardship for this university?

Instead of indicating a probable start date in January, Carleton should be looking to hire employees as soon as possible for its Attendant Services Program. Giving all students an opportunity to be involved in campus life must be Carleton’s top priority, to fulfil the “university’s obligation ” to accommodate students with disabilities.”

After a year of isolation, we have all had time to reflect on how we can improve. Carleton’s opportunity to do better is still within reach.

Ben BourneFlosman is a 17-year-old Carleton University student with big dreams of success and happiness. Contact him at: [email protected]

Original at https://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/bourneflosman-carleton-university-isnt-living-up-to-its-accessibility-pledge




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Ford Government Belatedly Extended to September 13, 2021 the Deadline for Sending Feedback on Recommendations to Remove Disability Barriers from Ontario’s Health Care System


Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update

United for a Barrier-Free Society for All People with Disabilities

Web: www.aodaalliance.org

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @aodaalliance

Facebook: www.facebook.com/aodaalliance/

Ford Government Belatedly Extended to September 13, 2021 the Deadline for Sending Feedback on Recommendations to Remove Disability Barriers from Ontario’s Health Care System

August 18, 2021

        SUMMARY

1. Summary of All Deadlines for Sending Feedback to the Ford Government on What is Needed in New Education and Health Care Accessibility Standards

Last week, after the Ford Government’s deadline had already expired for submitting feedback on the barriers that people with disabilities face in the health care system, the Government extended that deadline. The Government never told us about that extension. After we heard a rumour about it, we asked the Government if there was an extension. The Government then put us on a list of people being notified about this extension. We do not know who else has been alerted to it.

You may understandably be very confused about when you can give the Ford Government this feedback, as well as your input on two other proposals that are out for public feedback, under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act. We here try to clarify things for you.

The bottom line is this: The Ford Government now has the initial reports of three different AODA Standards Development Committees publicly posted for your feedback and input. The Government has now extended two of the three deadlines it earlier announced for giving your feedback.

The AODA Alliance is taking part in all three consultations. We urge you to do so as well. We have submitted our detailed August 3, 2021 brief to the Health Care Standards Development Committee on its initial report. Please email that Committee to endorse the AODA Alliance brief. We know that the March of dimes of Canada and the Ontario Autism Coalition have already done so. Send them your endorsement of our brief by writing [email protected]

The deadlines for sending the Government your feedback are now as follows:

  1. You have up to September 13, 2021 to give feedback on the initial report of the Health Care Standards Development Committee. It recommends what should be included in the promised Health Care Accessibility Standard to tear down the disability barriers facing people with disabilities in Ontario’s health care system.
  1. You have up to September 29, 2021 to give the Government feedback on the initial report of the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee. It recommends what should be included in the Education Accessibility Standard to tear down the disability barriers impeding students with disabilities in Ontario’s colleges and universities.
  1. You have up to September 30, 2021 to give feedback on the initial report of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee. It recommends what should be included in the promised Education Accessibility Standard to tear down the disability barriers facing students with disabilities in Ontario’s education system.

Where do you send your feedback? Here are the email addresses to use:

 2. What Comes Next

What happens after all this feedback is gathered? After these feedback periods expire, three Government-appointed Standards Development Committees are to go back to work. They are supposed to review all the public feedback they received, and make any changes to their recommendations to the Government. They then submit their finalized report to the Ford Government on what they think the Government should include in the AODA accessibility standard on which they are working.

Section 10(2) of the AODA requires the Government to publicly post each final report from a Standards Development Committee upon receiving it. After the Government receives a Standards Development Committees final report, it can enact the accessibility standard that the Committee recommended as is, or with any changes it wishes. The Government can also do nothing at all.

At the very lethargic and sluggish rate that the Ford Government has been acting on implementing the AODA, it is extremely unlikely that it will enact a Health Care Accessibility Standard or Education Accessibility Standard before next June’s provincial election. It has enacted no accessibility standards and made no revisions to any accessibility standards since it took office over three years ago.

Making this worse, the Ford Government has not made any changes to strengthen the 2011 Transportation Accessibility Standard, even though the Government received a final report from the Transportation Accessibility Standard in the spring of 2018. It has not made any revisions to strengthen the Employment Accessibility Standard, even though it received the final report of the Employment Standards Development Committee over two years ago. It has not enacted any revisions to strengthen the Information and Communication Accessibility Standard, even though it received the Information and Communication Standards Development Committees final report almost one and a half years ago.

The AODA Alliance campaigned for over half a decade to get the Ontario Government to agree to develop and enact accessibility standards under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act in health care and education. The door is open for your input. These opportunities don’t often come along.

In next June’s provincial election, we plan to ask the major parties to commit to action to make Ontario’s education system and health care system fully accessible to people with disabilities. The current public consultations can help with that effort.

 3. Helpful Resources

a) On Disability Barriers in the K-12 Ontario School system

  1. The entire 185-page K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial report and initial recommendations on what the promised Education Accessibility Standard should include to make education in Ontario schools barrier-free for all students with disabilities.
  1. The AODA Alliance’s 55-page condensed and annotated version of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial report and recommendations.
  1. The AODA Alliance’s 15-page summary of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial report and recommendations.
  1. The AODA Alliance‘s action kit on how to give public feedback on the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial report and recommendations.
  1. A captioned video by AODA Alliance Chair David Lepofsky explaining what is in the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial report.
  1. A captioned video of tips for parents of students with disabilities on how to advocate at school for their child’s needs.
  1. For general background, the AODA Alliance website Education page.

b) On Disability Barriers in Ontario Colleges and Universities

  1. The initial report of the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee is available at https://www.aodaalliance.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/PSE-SDC-Initial-Recommendations-Report_June-25-2021.docx
  1. The draft framework for the Post-Secondary Education Accessibility Standard that the AODA Alliance sent to the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee in March, 2020.
  1. You can learn more about our years of advocacy to make all parts of Ontario’s education system accessible for students with disabilities by visiting the AODA Alliance website’s education page.

c) On Disability Barriers in Ontario’s Health Care System

  1. The initial report of the Health Care Standards Development Committee is available at https://www.aodaalliance.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/Health-Care-SDC-Initial-Report-As-Submitted.doc
  1. The AODA Alliance’s August 3, 2021 brief to the Health Care Standards Development Committee giving feedback on its initial report is available at https://www.aodaalliance.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/August-3-2021-finalized-AODA-Alliance-Brief-to-Health-Care-Standards-Development-Committee.docx
  1. The AODA Alliance’s February 25, 2020 Framework that it submitted to the Health Care Standards Development Committee on what the promised Health Care Accessibility Standard should include.
  1. A comprehensive captioned video by AODA Alliance Chair David Lepofsky on the barriers facing people with disabilities in the health care system.
  1. A detailed captioned video by AODA Alliance Chair David Lepofsky on the dangers of disability discrimination in Ontario’s controversial critical care triage protocol during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  1. Background on the AODA Alliance’s campaign for barrier-free health care services for people with disabilities is available on the AODA Alliance website’s health care page.

 4. The Ford Government’s Confused and Confusing Handling of the current Public Consultations on AODA Accessibility Standards

So far, the Ford Government has shown poor leadership in how it has handled the current public consultations. For example:

  • It withheld publicly posting these three initial reports for a long time, even though the AODA s. 10(1) requires the Government to post each upon receiving the report. It delayed publicly posting the health Care Standards Development Committee initial report for over 5 months after receiving it. It delayed publicly posting the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee’s initial report for 3.5 months after receiving it. It delayed publicly posting the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial report for 2.5 months after receiving it. In the case of the Health Care Standards Development Committee, that Committee voted to approve its initial report back in September 2020, almost a full year ago.
  • The Government’s delay in publicly posting the Health Care Standards Development Committee’s typifies how this governmental lethargy hurts people with disabilities. That initial report includes recommendations for action needed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. For example, it raises concerns about the Government’s critical care triage protocol that endangers some patients with disabilities in Ontario hospitals. The Government kept that report secret from the public over critical months when the danger to people with disabilities was especially high. During that same time, the Minister of Health refused to answer any of the AODA Alliance’s detailed letters raising serious human rights concerns about the Government’s critical care triage protocol and plans.
  • The Government did not announce the extension of the original August 11, 2021 deadline for submitting public feedback on the ‘Health Care Standards Development Committees initial report until August 13, 2021, after that feedback period had already expired. Organizations like the AODA Alliance therefore unnecessarily were forced to rush in the midst of the summer vacation period to submit their feedback before the August 11, 2021 period.
  • Rather than properly informing the entire public, the Ford Government appears to have only let some people know about the extension of the deadline for feedback on the Health Care Standards Development Committees initial report. As noted above, when we heard a rumour about this late last week, we wrote the Government to ask about it. It was only after that that the Government sent out an email to us announcing its extension.
  • The Government initially scheduled the public feedback period on the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee’s initial report to end on September 2, 2021, before the school year begins. This created hardships for giving feedback in connection with the school system. The Government only belatedly agreed to lengthen that feedback period.

 5. Will the Ford Government’s Delays on Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Ever End?

For over three years, we have pressed the Ford Government to develop a detailed plan on accessibility, to lay out how it will get Ontario to the AODA’s mandatory goal of becoming accessible to people with disabilities by 2025. It has never done so.

On January 31, 2019, the Government received the blistering final report of the David Onley Independent Review of the AODA’s implementation. Minister for Accessibility Raymond Cho publicly said on April 10, 2019, that David Onley did a “marvelous job.”

The Onley report found that Ontario is full of “soul-crushing” barriers impeding people with disabilities. It concluded that progress on accessibility has taken place at a “glacial pace.” It determined that that the goal of accessibility by 2025 is nowhere in sight, and that specific new Government actions, spelled out in the report, are needed.

In the 931 days since receiving the Onley Report, the Ford Government has not made public a comprehensive plan to implement that report’s findings and recommendations. The Government has staged some media events with the Accessibility Minister to make announcements, but little if anything new was ever announced.

        MORE DETAILS

August 13, 2021 Broadcast Email from the Accessibility Directorate of Ontario

Dear all,

We are pleased to share that the public feedback period for the Health Care SDC Initial Recommendations has been extended for an additional month, to September 13, 2021. The additional time is intended to recognize that organizations across the health sector and the disability community may require more time to review and respond given the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

As a reminder, the Initial Recommendations Report of the Health Care Standards Development Committee is available online here for public comment:

https://www.ontario.ca/page/consultation-initial-recommendations-development-health-care-accessibility-standards

 

As these recommendations may impact you or your community, we would encourage you to participate in this process. We would also encourage you to share this information broadly with your networks.

A survey has been developed to seek public feedback and is linked from the consultation page together with the report itself.

Written submissions can also be sent by email to [email protected]. Members of the public or interested organizations can also reach out to the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Division by email at [email protected] for any questions.

All feedback received will be considered by the Committee before finalizing their recommendations to the Minister. Identifying information will remain confidential as per the Government of Ontario’s Privacy Policy, and all survey responses will remain anonymous.

Sincerely,

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Division

Ministry for Seniors and Accessibility



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CBC Reports on Troubling Disability Barrier at Canada’s Wonderland – and – Ford Government Extends Deadline to September 30, 2021 to Send in Public Feedback on Disability Barriers in Ontario’s School system


Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update

United for a Barrier-Free Society for All People with Disabilities

Web: www.aodaalliance.org

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @aodaalliance

Facebook: www.facebook.com/aodaalliance/

CBC Reports on Troubling Disability Barrier at Canada’s Wonderland – and – Ford Government Extends Deadline to September 30, 2021 to Send in Public Feedback on Disability Barriers in Ontario’s School system

August 6, 2021

SUMMARY

1. More Proof that the Ontario Government’s Implementation and Enforcement of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act is Ineffectual

The AODA was passed in 2005 so that disability barriers in Ontario would be removed and prevented, without people with disabilities having to battle those barriers one at a time. Here is another inexcusable illustration of how still we must continue to battle those barriers, one at a time, even more than 16 years after the AODA was enacted.

CBC Radio Toronto reported yesterday on a recent incident where Canada’s Wonderland, a well-established amusement park north of Toronto, refused to allow a person with a disability to go on any rides whatsoever. We set out below the online report on CBC’s website. If Ontario had a strong, effective Customer Service Accessibility Standard under the AODA, and if the Ford Government enforced it effectively, such incidents would not continue to occur.

Even 918 days after the Ford Government received a strong call to beef up the AODA’s implementation and enforcement by the Independent Review Report prepared by former Lieutenant Governor David Onley, The Government still has no comprehensive plan to ensure that Ontario becomes accessible to people with disabilities by 2025, under 3.5 years from now.

2. The Ford Government Has Extended to September 30, 2021 the Deadline for Submitting Public Feedback on the Initial Report of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee

The Ford Government has given you more time to send in your feedback on the disability barriers that impede students with disabilities in Ontario schools. You now have up to September 30, rather than September 2, 2021, to send in your feedback.

This is a once-in-a-generation opportunity. We encourage one and all to let that Standards Development Committee know what you think.

The Government’s original September 2, 2021 deadline was exceedingly unrealistic, since schools are closed for the summer. However, the Government earlier unfairly delayed the entire feedback process, because it withheld the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee’s initial report for 2.5 months before publicly posting it. We are eager for all Standards Development Committees to have their final reports submitted to the Government by the end of this year, if possible, and to have them made public upon the Government receiving them, not months later.

We especially call on each school board’s Special Education Advisory Committee to take this extended opportunity to have their say by sending their feedback to The Government, and by urging their school board to now start implementing the recommendations that the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee prepared.

The AODA Alliance website has helpful resources to make it easier to give your feedback:

  1. A 50 minute captioned video that explains what the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial report recommends.
  1. The entire 185-page K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial report and initial recommendations on what the promised Education Accessibility Standard should include to make education in Ontario schools barrier-free for all students with disabilities.
  1. The AODA Alliance’s 55-page condensed and annotated version of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial report and recommendations.
  1. The AODA Alliance’s 15-page summary of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial report and recommendations.
  1. The AODA Alliance‘s action kit on how to give public feedback on the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial report and recommendations.
  1. A captioned video of tips for parents of students with disabilities on how to advocate at school for their child’s needs.
  1. For general background, the AODA Alliance website Education page.

^MORE DETAILS

CBC News Online August 5, 2021

Originally posted at https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/paraplegic-man-denied-access-to-rides-1.6129624

Man with disability feels ‘belittled’ after Canada’s Wonderland denies him access to all its rides |

By Jessica Cheung, CBC News

Ahmad El Nasser was looking forward to a visit to Canada’s Wonderland with his niece, but when they got there, he found out he wouldn’t be able to go on any of the rides due to his disability.

“When I was denied access. I kind of felt belittled. I felt a little bit humiliated,” El Nasser, who is paralyzed from the waist down due to a spinal cord injury, told CBC News.

“Being able to ride on these rides is not the big deal; the big deal is seeing my niece upset.”

When El Nasser arrived at the park on July 19 he was given a “boarding pass,” which allows guests with mobility restrictions or cognitive impairment to get on attractions at specified times via the alternate access entrance without having to be in lineups.

Then, El Nasser said he was asked a series of questions, such as “Can you transfer?” That means moving from a wheelchair to other locations — something he is able to do.

Ahmad El Nasser is paralyzed from the waist down after a motorcycle accident 10 years ago. He uses a wheelchair but says he is still very active and outgoing.

“I have full, complete upper body control … I can transfer. I can get on beds. I can get in my car. I can get in rides, no problem,” he said.

“I answered all of them as best I could.”

But the rider access form El Nasser received said he would not be allowed to go on any rides in the park and when he asked why, staff said it was due to manufacturers’ liability.

“I couldn’t even get on little kiddy rides,” he said.

“So it pretty much had nothing to do with my physical capabilities, whether I can transfer, whether I can do this or that. It was, ‘Hey, we don’t want to get sued, so you can’t go on.’”

In a statement, Canada’s Wonderland said it is committed to giving all guests with disabilities the same opportunity to enjoy and benefit from their services and attractions in a similar way as other guests.

“The ride admission policy at Canada’s Wonderland is developed in consultation with industry experts and based on the safety recommendations of the ride manufacturers,” the amusement park’s management said in a statement.

“The safety of our guests and associates is our first priority and we reserve the right to make the final decision regarding the eligibility of a rider to endure the dynamics of a ride without risk of injury to themselves or other riders.”

The company said it is equally committed to providing accommodations to people with disabilities.

El Nasser, whose injury is the result of a motorcycle accident about a decade ago, was refunded the money for his park pass. He said the experience felt discriminatory.

“Nobody really took the time on their end to understand each [of our] individual needs … I felt it was easier for them to just put us all in one bag and say, ‘This is the no section.’”

Laverne Jacobs, a faculty of law professor at the University of Windsor, said when El Nasser paid his admission fee for the park, he entered into a contract that gives him the right to be accommodated to the point of undue hardship under Ontario’s Accessibility Standards for Customer Service.

“What that means is that the park not only should be asking questions about what he can do, but should be trying to use that information in order to accommodate him to make sure that they can help to support and enable him to participate in the activities,” Jacobs said.

Jacobs says safety is a factor in this incident but believes the park created a blanket exclusion to “contract out their obligation to accommodate people with disabilities.”

“It seems that [the park] wanted to enter into a contract that says we don’t want to take on any risk of an accident whatsoever … the very problematic piece of this, though, is that in order to avoid all risk, they’ve essentially categorically excluded individuals with particular disabilities.”

David Lepofsky, the chair of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance, says service providers like Canada’s Wonderland have a duty to accommodate customers with disabilities.

“If the individual can make an informed decision for themselves that they want to assume that risk, then it’s not for Canada’s Wonderland to unilaterally make that decision for them,” he said.

Canada’s Wonderland does have a guest assistance guide, but Lepofsky says individuals with disabilities need to be dealt with case-by-case.

“Canada’s Wonderland has a duty to investigate solutions,” he said.

“Including investigating it with the individual and find out if other amusement parks have allowed something similar before they could just slam the door on this individual.”

A petition launched by El Nasser’s sister is calling for an end to the exclusion of paraplegics and quadriplegics from rides at the park. It has since garnered hundreds of signatures. El Nasser said he hopes shedding light on this will spark some action.

“What I would like to see changed is for people with disabilities to have that confidence to know that [the park is] doing more and they’re treating us with respect individually, that they want to let us ride.”



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Send Your Feedback on the Initial Report/Recommendations by the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee on What Must Be Done to Make Ontario Colleges and Universities Accessible for Students with Disabilities


Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update

United for a Barrier-Free Society for All People with Disabilities

Web: www.aodaalliance.org

Email: [email protected]

Twitter: @aodaalliance

Facebook: www.facebook.com/aodaalliance/

Send Your Feedback on the Initial Report/Recommendations by the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee on What Must Be Done to Make Ontario Colleges and Universities Accessible for Students with Disabilities

June 30, 2021

SUMMARY

There are now three different public consultations going on at the same time on the content of new accessibility standards to be enacted under the AODA. The first, ending on August 11, 2021, concerns the disability barriers facing patients with disabilities in Ontario hospitals. The second, ending on September 2, 2021, concerns the barriers impeding students with disabilities in Ontario schools between Kindergarten and Grade 12. The third, which ends on September 29, 2021, and which we are focusing on in this Update, concerns the barriers impeding students with disabilities in Ontario colleges and universities.

The AODA Alliance will be taking part in all three consultations. We urge you to do so as well. We will say more over the next weeks about each of them.

The AODA Alliance campaigned for over half a decade to get the Ontario Government to agree to develop and enact accessibility standards under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act in each of these three areas. The door is now wide open for your input. These opportunities don’t often come along. We will make public tools available to make it easier for you to have your say. The Ontario Government has not enacted a new accessibility standard under the AODA in fully nine years.

            MORE DETAILS

1. Send Us Your Feedback on the Initial Report and Recommendations of the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee

What needs to be done to tear down the many barriers that impede students with disabilities in college and university programs? The Ontario Government has promised to develop a Post-Secondary Education Accessibility Standard to address these barriers under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act.

Since 2018, the Government-appointed Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee has been coming up with recommendations for the Ontario Government on what should be included in the promised Post-Secondary Education Accessibility Standard. On March 12, 2021, it submitted its initial or draft report and recommendations to the Ontario Government.

Three and a half months later, on June 25, 2021, the Ford Government made that initial report public. The public can send feedback on it. Feedback is invited until September 29, 2021. You can send your input to the Government by writing [email protected]

That feedback will be shared with the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee. That Committee will then finalize its recommendations and submit them to the Government.

You can download the initial report and recommendations of the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee by visiting https://www.aodaalliance.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/PSE-SDC-Initial-Recommendations-Report_June-25-2021.docx

You can download the initial recommendations on student transitions, prepared jointly by the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee and the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee, by visiting https://www.aodaalliance.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/MSAA-NP-K-12-SDC-Sub-Committee-Transition-Report-FINAL-EN.docx

You can download the Ford Government’s survey form for giving the Government feedback in this area by visiting the Government’s website, or by visiting https://www.aodaalliance.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Postsecondary_Education_Standards_Initial_Recommendations_Survey-June-25-2021.docx

The AODA Alliance will be making submissions on this initial report and its initial recommendations. We also welcome your feedback as we prepare our brief to the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee. Write us at [email protected]

Don’t confuse the Post-Secondary Education Accessibility Standard that we are discussing here with the promised new accessibility standard to address barriers facing students with disabilities in schools between Kindergarten and Grade 12. That would be addressed in the promised K-12 Education Accessibility Standard.

We will have more to say in the coming weeks about the initial report and recommendations by the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee. Stay tuned.

You can learn more about this topic by looking at the draft framework for the Post-Secondary Education Accessibility Standard that the AODA Alliance sent to the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee in March, 2020. You can learn more about our years of advocacy to make all parts of Ontario’s education system accessible for students with disabilities by visiting the AODA Alliance website’s education page.

2. The AODA Alliance’s Video Summarizing the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee’s Initial Reports and Recommendations is Now Captioned

The AODA Alliance’s new online video that summarizes the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee’s initial report and recommendations is now captioned. Please encourage educators and parents of students with disabilities to watch this video. It gives you all the information you need in order to take part in the current public consultation on the barriers that confront students with disabilities in K-12 education in Ontario schools.

If you know anyone that sits on a school board’s Special Education Advisory Committee or a municipality’s Accessibility Advisory Committee, urge them to watch this video. It is available to one and all at https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8

If you just want to watch part of that video, you can jump to any of the topics it covers, by using these links:

  1. Start of the video: https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8
  1. 2. What is the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act? What is an accessibility standard? (3:30 minutes) https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=210
  1. What is the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee? (4:45 minutes): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=285
  1. What is the current public consultation? (6:45 minutes): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=405
  1. What can an accessibility standard include? (7:35 minutes): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=455
  1. Why do we need an Education Accessibility Standard? (8:10 minutes): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=490
  1. How to have your say. Different ways you can give your feedback to the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee up to September 2, 2021 (11 minutes): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=660
  1. What did the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee recommend in its initial report? Review of the 20 major themes in the initial recommendations of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee (13:20 minutes): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=800
  1. Tips on what you can do right now to use the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee’s initial report, in order to press for action to help students with disabilities (43 minutes): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=2580
  1. Conclusion and further resources for more information and to help you give feedback (46:50): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=2810

3. The Ford Government’s Delay on Accessibility Drags on as the 2021 Summer Begins

For three years, we have been urging the Ford Government to develop a detailed plan on accessibility, to lay out how it will get Ontario to the AODA’s mandatory goal of becoming accessible to people with disabilities by 2025. It has never done so.

On January 31, 2019, the Government received the final report of the David Onley Independent Review of the AODA’s implementation and enforcement. Minister for Accessibility Raymond Cho publicly said on April 10, 2019, that David Onley did a “marvelous job.”

The Onley report found that Ontario is still full of “soul-crushing” barriers impeding people with disabilities. It concluded that progress on accessibility has taken place at a “glacial pace.” It determined that that the goal of accessibility by 2025 is nowhere in sight, and that specific new Government actions, spelled out in the report, are needed.

However, in the 881 days since receiving the Onley Report, the Ford Government has not made public a detailed and comprehensive plan to implement that report’s findings and recommendations. The Government has staged some media events with the Accessibility Minister to make announcements, but little if anything new was ever announced.



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Download in MS Word format the initial report/recommendations on transitions prepared by a joint subcommittee of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committeeand the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee



Download in MS Word format the initial report/recommendations on transitions prepared by a joint subcommittee of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committeeand the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee



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Download in MS Word format the Survey Questionnaire that the Ontario Government posted on June 25, 2021 regarding the initial report/recommendations of the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee



Download in MS Word format the survey questionnaire that the Ontario Government posted on June 25, 2021 regarding the initial report/recommendations of the Post-Secondary Education Standards Development Committee



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Check Out the New Video that Explains the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee’s 185-Page Initial Report and Gives Tips on How to Give Feedback


Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act Alliance Update

United for a Barrier-Free Society for All People with Disabilities

Web: www.aodaalliance.org Email: [email protected] Twitter: @aodaalliance Facebook: www.facebook.com/aodaalliance/

Check Out the New Video that Explains the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee’s 185-Page Initial Report and Gives Tips on How to Give Feedback

June 24, 2021

            SUMMARY

We today unveil another new video! This video gives you helpful information on how and why to give feedback on the disability barriers that face students with disabilities in Ontario schools. The Ontario Government is conducting a public consultation this summer, ending on September 2, 2021. It is gathering feedback from the public on the initial recommendations in this area that have been prepared by the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee and posted for public comment. This new video is available at https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8

This public consultation is the first time in a generation or longer that the Ontario Government has taken a good look at Ontario’s school system from the perspective of students with disabilities. The AODA Alliance wants to help you have your say. This video will be helpful for you if you are:

* a student with disabilities;

* a family member of students with disabilities;

* a teacher or other education staff;

* a school principal or vice principal, or school board administrator;

* a member of an Accessibility Advisory Committee or Special Education Advisory Committee;

* connected with a disability community organization;

* teaching in a Faculty of Education, or

* studying in a Faculty of Education or Early Childhood Education.

The video is recorded by AODA Alliance Chair David Lepofsky. He is also a Visiting Professor of Disability Rights and Legal Education at the Osgoode Hall Law School. He is a member of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee, and a member and past chair of the Special Education Advisory Committee of the Toronto District School Board.

We hope this video helps you decide whether to give feedback to the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee, and helps you think about what feedback to give. You could use all or part of it as part of a public forum to gather input for the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee. If you are part of a committee or group that is going to collectively give feedback, such as a Special Education Advisory Committee, your members might find it helpful to watch this video before going to a meeting to discuss the feedback that you wish to give to the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee.

This video is 49 minutes long. Some might only want to watch part of it. To help with this, we set out below links to each major heading or topic in the video. You can just jump right to the part that you find most helpful to you.

In the video, Lepofsky refers to various helpful resources for you to read, if you want more information. Below is a list of these resources, with links to them.

Please encourage others to watch this video. Publicize it on social media.

This video is now in the process of being captioned. This captioning (and not just Youtube’s automated captions) should be available in the next few days.

As this video makes clear, it was not produced by the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee.

Did you find this video helpful? Write us at [email protected]

            MORE DETAILS

1. How to Jump Directly to Each Topic in This New Video

  1. Start of the video: https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8
  1. 2. What is the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act? What is an accessibility standard? (3:30: minutes) https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=210
  1. What is the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee? (5 minutes): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=285
  1. What is the current public consultation? (6:50 minutes): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=405
  1. What can an accessibility standard include? (7:35 minutes): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=455
  1. Why do we need an Education Accessibility Standard? (8 minutes): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=490
  1. How to have your say. Different ways you can give your feedback to the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee up to September 2, 2021 (11 minutes): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=660
  1. What did the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee recommend in its initial report? Review of the 20 major themes in the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial recommendations (13:20 minutes): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=800
  1. Tips on what you can do right now to use the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee’s initial report, to get action to help students with disabilities (43 minutes): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=2580
  1. Conclusion and Further resources for more information and to help you give feedback (46:50): https://youtu.be/yjQgOjRTZJ8?t=2810

2. Key Background Resources

  1. The entire 185-page K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial report and initial recommendations on what the promised Education Accessibility Standard should include to make education in Ontario schools barrier-free for all students with disabilities.
  2. The AODA Alliance’s 55-page condensed and annotated version of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial report and recommendations.
  3. The AODA Alliance’s 15-page summary of the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial report and recommendations.
  4. The AODA Alliance‘s action kit on how to give public feedback on the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee initial report and recommendations.
  5. The June 16, 2021 AODA Alliance Update, setting out the K-12 Education Standards Development Committee‘s recommendations for designing a barrier-free school building.
  6. A captioned video of tips for parents of students with disabilities on how to advocate at school for their child’s needs.
  7. For general background, the AODA Alliance website Education page.



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